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Old 06-05-2010, 01:11 PM   #1
jjc23
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Remove old thinset before tiling?

I've just removed the old tile in my bathroom. It was a mosaic tile that was on a paper backing. I'm left with a layer of thinset with the paper backing embedded into it (see pic). Do I need to remove this down to the concrete slab before I can lay new tiles? If I do, any suggestions on how to do this? If I don't, what surface preparation needs to be done before laying the new tiles? Thanks

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Old 06-05-2010, 01:48 PM   #2
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JJC,

Welcome.

Do you need to? No

Will life be easier if you do something? Yes. To get the best surface for tiling, I would use a cup grinder and take that all off. Its quick and easy if you have a 2 row diamond cup grinder laying around or can rent one. It will make lots of dust but will be over in a few minutes.

OR

You can use one of these and get a tremendous shoulder and arm workout.

OR

if height isn't an issue, you can float over it with some thinset, making it as flat as possible, after using the blue handles rubbing stone.
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Old 06-06-2010, 05:40 PM   #3
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Thanks for the advise. Don't think I'm up for the manual approach. Going to try the cup grinder. They don't have them at my local HD, so I've ordered one.
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Old 06-06-2010, 07:59 PM   #4
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Bathroom remodel - first time using KERDI

I've just gutted the bathroom in my basement and I'm preparing to use KERDI for the first time . I've purchased the Kerdi Shower Book and I'm putting my shopping list together.

The floor is concrete slab, in good condition and level. I plan on tiling the entire shower enclosure (floor, walls, ceiling) and bathroom floor with Quartzine. I'm considering putting in radiant floor heating.

In the shower enclosure I'll be using a Keridi Shower Kit, Ditra on the bathroom floor and Versabond. I'm going to use standard drywall rather than CBU.

Any words of wisdom for a Kerdi newbie?

If I go with a heating mat, is the recommend approach to use CBU around the floor edge / toilet /sink area where the mat doesn't go and them use SLC over the mat to create a level surface?
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Old 06-06-2010, 09:12 PM   #5
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JJC,
'
Welcome to the forum. If you can change your name to ...well, your name, so we know what to call you. Also let us know where you are located. Its handy for us to know what materials to recommend as not everything is available everywhere. And if there is about to be a loud explosion, we'll want to know which way to face away from.

From what you wrote I think you are headed in the right direction. Read, study, ask questions, and take pictures. Some closer some further away.Post before you do anything, We like looking over your shoulder and often can spot things in the background.

The biggest problem I seem to read about with kerdi is getting the thinset to the right consistency and avoiding tiger striping. A practice area will be a good idea. A helper is an even better idea.
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Old 06-13-2010, 08:05 PM   #6
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I tried the double-row diamond tip cup grinder this weekend and it removes the thinset like it's butter. Couple of challenges:
- It works so easily it's hard not to grind into the concrete slab
- The amount of dust is significant. I've sealed off the room with plastic sheeting and duct tape
- It's hard to see what I'm doing - the goggles get covered in dust and my glasses get steamed up!

..... but I'm making progress.
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Old 06-13-2010, 08:13 PM   #7
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Radiant floor heating

I want to install radiant floor heating over a concrete slab. Suntouch makes a kit that is just the right size for the area: http://www.warmyourfloor.com/product...-10-sq-ft.html

They recommend that you put an insulating layer over the concrete slab. Warm Your Floor recommends cork, anyone know if this works well and is necessary?http://www.warmyourfloor.com/product...-per-inch.html

Also, should I be sealing the concrete slab with a product like Damplock? I have no reason to believe there is a high moisture content in the concrete, but want to take the opportunity to do this while the slab is exposed if it's recommended.
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Old 06-13-2010, 08:53 PM   #8
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You poor thing .
Get your shop vac out and hold it next to the grinder .
You will pick up most of the dust before it hits the air .
You really don't have to work like you have been .

good luck

I bet it has looked like this in there
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:09 PM   #9
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Ohh My, that's why I am so against grinding stuff like that.
I would rather do an SLC and be done with it.
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:11 PM   #10
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If you use a shop vac to suck up the dust, take an extra extension cord, wrap it around the intake hose then plug the one free end into an electrical outlet or wrap it around the cord to the shop vac. Cement dust going through the vac tube will create a nice static charge. The extension cord trick will dissipate the static charge buildup by grounding out the shop vac hose
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:21 PM   #11
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Nothing wrong with a little static shock...lets you know your still alive
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:23 PM   #12
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To do grinding the right way ,go to a rental shop and get a 7" grinder with a dust shroud and a heavy duty vac . The pull on the vac is so strong you will have to lift hard to get the grinder off the floor . Your plastic you cover the walls with will be clean anuff to use on the next job . Some floors you are better off grinding the highs before you fill .
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Old 06-13-2010, 11:01 PM   #13
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Welcome, JJ.

I've combined your first three threads on this project here for continuity so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered. It looks a bit disjointed now because of your multiple threads, but it'll all sort itself out as you progress.

Please see post #5.

I think a little insulation over SOG for radiant heat is a good idea, but most heating system manufacturers seem to think it unnecessary. Cork would work some, but is really of little value. There are better choices, but, again, not sure they're worth the time and expense. Up to you.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 06-14-2010, 07:36 AM   #14
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Radiant heat mat - on-top or under Ditra

I have conflicting advise on if the radiant heat mat should be installed under or on-top of Ditra when used on a concrete slab. Schulter recommends under and SunTouch on-top. Any thoughts on the correct approach?

I'm using a tile reinforcing system made by Ditra. Do I install SunTouch mat under or over their product?
Their instructions indicate that heating elements are always installed under Ditra. However, when used on a concrete slab, heating elements should be installed over Ditra.
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Old 06-14-2010, 08:29 AM   #15
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Ditra always wants to be next to the tile, no matter what's going on underneath.

I disagree with CX on the value of cork under heat mats. 1/8" cork provides enough insulation that you will not see any increase in your electric bill from operating the heat. 1/4" cork reduces the heating load on the house heating system and may pay for itself in a number of years. However, I do agree that cork is not necessary for the electric heating mats adequately heat the floor. There is usually plenty of heat available to overcome the losses to the slab and earth.
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