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Unread 06-05-2010, 01:31 PM   #1
Gukki
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Ellie's hall bathroom

Hi All,

My question is not technically a tile question, but without an answer we will not ever get to tiling our hall bath. So here goes:
We are trying to remove a hideous pink/brown cast iron tub dating from the 60s. Before quartering the beast with diamond blade saws, we need to remove the drain. So at Lowe's we acquired a cast aluminum tub drain tool. We inserted it, and with the help of an ratchet wrench tried to turn it open. It wouldn't budge, we applied some more force, and voila, the darn cast aluminum tool broke. So what do we do now? Is there another tool we could use? How have all you DYI ers out there removed your tub drains?
Your help will be very much appreciated.
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Unread 06-05-2010, 01:38 PM   #2
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Ellie,

The best tool for removing a cast iron bath tub is one of these.
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Unread 06-05-2010, 01:41 PM   #3
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Also wear goggles. Start someplace weak on the tub like a skirt corner or the tub bottom if there is no cement bed underneath. Big flat areas break easier than curved surfaces. Smash it into sizes of pieces you can get in and out of your car at the recycle place. When you get down to a piece around the drain you can start to move it around to get to the coupling and remove that so the drain part that you see from the user side of the tub comes out with a short section of drain attached.
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Unread 06-05-2010, 01:52 PM   #4
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Paul,

Thanks for that quick reply.
But, aarghh, sheer force is just what we wanted to avoid. Is there not a risk with the use of sledge hammers of damaging the drainpipe below the tub?
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Unread 06-05-2010, 02:02 PM   #5
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I take it there is no access under the tub to the drain? We just hired a plumber to yank ours out. He used a sawzall to cut the drain/overflow piping. From there we were able to simply remove the tub as a unit.... YMMV
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Unread 06-05-2010, 02:11 PM   #6
Gukki
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You're right, there is no access.
But as Paul suggested, we will attack the weak apron edge first, and hammer and cut our way to that drain, once we can get to it from underneath, we might be able to cut it from underneath, or as Paul says, wriggle the thing free.
I'll let you know how it went. (Hopefully soon)
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Unread 06-05-2010, 02:29 PM   #7
Shawn Prentice
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I throw an old blanket (heavy duty, like a moving blanket. I've also used carpet scraps) over those before breaking them up...keeps the flying debris to a minimum.
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Unread 06-05-2010, 03:02 PM   #8
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Shawn, thanks for the advise, we'll definitely follow it
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Unread 06-05-2010, 05:05 PM   #9
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I have removed many cast iron tubs. Trust me this is the fastest easiest way to accomplish the task and to get it into manageable pieces. And its fun. Got an angry teenager around?

once you get the tub cracked, it breaks up quite easily.
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Unread 06-05-2010, 06:08 PM   #10
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To remove the drain when the wrench won't brake it loose ,Try a chisel and a hammer , cut a slot in the flange at a angle on the top inside edge with the flange then use the slot to hold the chisel and hammer the drain around in tell it comes loose .
To smash a tub cover windows,toilets and everything you want to save , Including your face ,arms ,hands and your ears . That ring can be very loud . Like Shawn said covering the tub can help from shards flying across the room or at you .
Good luck ,Have fun !
P.S. If you can get to the curb someone will pick it up for you . If it is still there the next day post it on craigslist list free at curb . I have never had one not just disappear yet .
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Unread 06-05-2010, 06:17 PM   #11
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It's out!

Thanks guys!
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Unread 10-11-2010, 04:25 PM   #12
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Hello everyone,

Summer was just too hot for us to work in this bathroom, open to the hot attic. But we're at it again, and have the following questions regarding the floor:
Turns out, the reason for the squeaking is that we have something of a floating floor. The subfloor is about 7/16" thick, followed evert 16" on center, by 1/2" battens (is that what these boards are called?) which are nailed down into the floor joists below. On top of that is another layer of 7/16" plywood topped by vinyl from the 60s. (picture 1)

We want to remove everything to the subfloor. To build up the floor, what thickness plywood is recommended? We will top the plywood with Durock followed by porcelain tile.

Also, (pictures 2+3) the hot and cold water supply pipes run underneath the future bathtub, which comes with adjustable legs. 2 of the legs will rest exactly over these pipes. We do not want to remove or reroute these pipes.

Is it enough to just screw down plywood on all sides of these pipes, thick enough to rise over the pipes? This would leave a bit of a gap the width of the copper pipe. Do you think that the 4" diameter legs will be able to span this gap and still hold the tub securely?. It's a 21" high, 32" wide, 60" long fiberglass/acrylic tub, that will hold 60 gallons, filled to the rim.

By the way, how do I rename this thread to "Ellie's hall bathroom"?

Thanks everyone
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Last edited by Gukki; 10-11-2010 at 04:45 PM.
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Unread 10-11-2010, 05:30 PM   #13
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I'm having trouble understanding how the floor(s) is constructed AND what the structure is like under there... Can you make a sketch or take photos showing a cross section of all the floors? and label all the parts/layers???

Without a doubt, 7/16 as a structural floor is not good for anything except taking out. Is this the only plywood layer in each floor? Adding another layer of ply on top is sometimes an option, but lets see how things are put together before we suggest going that route.

Also, what are size, spacing and maximum unsupported span of the joists? Need this info for each floor.

Are the joists bearing on foundation walls, beams, framed walls, etc...?
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Unread 10-11-2010, 06:49 PM   #14
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Thanks for your reply.

I'm sorry, I have not been very clear. So here, is a drawing of the situation.

The house was built in the 60s. It's a 2 story frame. Studs are 16" on center. All floor joists are 2x10" also 16" on center.

I hope the drawing helps.
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Last edited by Gukki; 10-11-2010 at 07:19 PM.
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Unread 10-11-2010, 11:28 PM   #15
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Great drawings!

So, you've got 2x10 joists, 16"OC, max span of 11'. Good for ceramic/porcelain.

I'd take all the stuff above those 2x10's out. All the ply, battens, tar paper, all of it. Then nail/screw & glue down new 3/4" subfloor. Use either tongue & groove plywood OR you'll need to add some 2x4 blocking between the 2x10's to support the plywood edges. Leave 1/4" gap around perimeter of the room or at intervening surfaces (pipes, cabinets, walls, etc...) and 1/8" gap between sheets. Nail every 6". Over that, you install the tile backer then tile.

I know you don't want to, but I'd re-route the plumbing so it's not directly under the weight of the tub. It's really not a big job, you don't need to move them far. I'd put them between the floor joists or in the stud walls. If you really don't want to re-route the pipes, then you'll need to build a proper raised floor. You can use 2x4's either flat or on edge every 16" (directly over the joists and 3/4 plywood). Over the 2x4's, you add another layer of 3/4 plywood, installed as above.
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