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Old 11-10-2001, 09:50 PM   #1
JC
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anyone know?
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Old 11-11-2001, 07:17 AM   #2
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Talking Yankee

I don't know the origin of the word yankee, but I do know that they call a 16oz. claw hammer a yankee screw driver in England
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Old 11-11-2001, 09:48 AM   #3
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As you all know (or should know), New York was originally New Amsterdam. It is thought that the term Yankee might be an Anglo approximation of the Dutch name Janke, which is a diminutive of the name Jan (John).

Derek,

The yankee screwdriver is a good one. There is such a thing, though. It's made (or was made) by a company named Yankee. Push on it and it rotates the screw. There was also a Yankee drill.
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Old 11-11-2001, 10:35 AM   #4
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Yeah, I was gonna point that out myownself, Derek. Them are what John gets out when somebody axes him if he's got any cordless tools.

Used to be everybody had a Yankee screwdriver or two. Actually, I may still have one in a dusty corner of the shop somewhere. Never found them particularly useful, but perhaps that was an operator problem. sometimes I find that a slight adjustment to the nut that holds the handle makes some other tools more effective, too.

And everbody knows that Yankee just means a person who lives farther north than you. Like, RobZ thinks people who live in New Amsterdam is Yankees, but he ain't. But of course he really is. I think it originated when some north persons tried to move south but got yanked back up north by the geography police. Ergo: Yankee (as apposed to Yanker).

Hey, makes sense to me.
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Old 11-11-2001, 11:31 AM   #5
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Question

We call our northern people ... Eskimos. I'm not sure what they call us exactly ... do adjectives count?

I'm just curious though. I was going to make a remark in a previous post using the term "yankee" in fun of course, but decided against it because I wasn't sure if it would offend anyone. I always thought it to have its origin from the civil war era which means that to some of my American cousins ... might be unacceptable. Fill me in.
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Old 11-11-2001, 11:48 AM   #6
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Harry

This is one of those topics that defies real explanation. Suffice to say that Kelly is right...any one from farther north of you is a Yankee. On the other side, people up north think anyone farther south than about Pennsylvania is in the Deep South. Somewhere west of Minnesota, it seems that people aren't Yankees anymore. Someone from Wyoming is not a Yankee, even though their latitude would otherwise qualify.

My MIL, for example, grew up in Brooklyn, and lived in Northern Jersey for 40 years before moving to VA to be near her daughter and granddaughter. She is suffering here in the Deep South for many reasons, but included is the lack of good bagels and pizza. Complaints like this qualify her as a Yankee no matter where she is.

Certain areas of the Deep South don't qualify as such. Miami, for example, will never be a Southern city.

Clear as mud, right? Don't worry about calling anyone a yankee or a southerner, because the recipient will only be happy to hear you say it. Unless, of course, you call them the wrong thing.
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Old 11-11-2001, 11:49 AM   #7
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Harry,

If you really want to get in trouble around here....

use a word as an adjective that ain't got no business being used as an adjective. Then the Grammar Police bust in and your finished.

You can call people Yankees all day long, just don't mis-diagram your sentences in the process.
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Old 11-11-2001, 12:17 PM   #8
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Yeah, Harry, Bud's right about that one. Like if you should use "your" when you actually mean "you're", them policia gonna be at your door in a New York minute.

That's why I always use my goodest grammar and small words, which is easy to spell.

And ol' Z is right on the money about Yankees. Ain't no way you're ever gonna get it right, 'cause, hell, we don't even know qual es qual. Things got so convaluted during the Great War of Northern Agression in this country, won't nobody never get a clear picher, 'specially if he ain't "from around here".

Having been born in New York, raised in Pennsylvania, and lived longer here in Texas than anywhere else, I am, of course, called the correct term in the local vernacular - Gringo!

Start a thread on the origin of that term and you'll get about as far as we've gotten on Yankee.
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Old 11-11-2001, 12:40 PM   #9
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What's so complicated? You got your yankers, obviously you also got your yankees. However, I can't claim the etymological authorities are exactly lining up to embrace this notion.

The origins of "Yankee" have been fiercely debated throughout the history of the Republic, and to this day the Oxford English Dictionary says the source of the word is "unascertained." Perhaps the most widely accepted explanation was advanced by H.L. Mencken, the well-known newsman-scholar (and don't tell me that isn't an unusual combination), who argued that Yankee derives from the expression Jan Kaas, literally "John Cheese." This supposedly was a derogatory nickname bestowed on the Dutch by the Germans and the Flemish in the 1600s. (Wisconsin cheeseheads can undoubtedly relate.)

The English later applied the term to Dutch pirates, and later still Dutch settlers in New York applied it to English settlers in Connecticut, who were known for their piratical trading practices. During the French and Indian War the British general James Wolfe took to referring derisively to the native New Englanders in his army as Yankees, and the term was widely popularized during the Revolutionary War by the song "Yankee Doodle." By the war's end, of course, the colonists had perversely adopted the term as their own. Southerners used Yankee pejoratively to describe Northerners during the Civil War, but found themselves, along with all other Americans, called thus by the English during world wars I and II.

The alternative explanations--Mencken lists 16 of them--are that Yankee derives from various Indian languages, or from Scottish, Swedish, Persian, etc. James Fenimore Cooper claimed that Yankee resulted from a fractured attempt by the Indians to pronounce the word "English." But most others think Cooper was about as good an etymologist as he was a novelist.

And that's all I know about that subject.

hehehe



(Plagerized from the Internet 11-11-01)
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Old 11-11-2001, 05:54 PM   #10
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Harry,

The Brits, the Aussies, the Kiwis and God only knows who else calls everyone in this country "Yanks." Nobody takes offense. It's actually a term of endearment. It's about the same as my calling you a Canuck, for which I hope you don't take offense because I ain't gonna quit.

When I first settled in Texas nearly 20 years ago there was a particular bumper sticker that seemed to be immensely popular.

"Keep Texas Beautiful. Put a Yankee on a Bus."

People displayed that on the left rear bumper. On the right was "Shit Happens."
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Old 11-11-2001, 06:35 PM   #11
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Thanks for clearing that up ..... I think.
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Old 11-11-2001, 08:42 PM   #12
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When I first moved to Texas (1981) there were "born in the Texas dirt Texans" that were genuinly pissed because I was there. Not because of anything I had done or said but because I was friggin' yank.

It took some gettin' yoose to yall.
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Old 11-11-2001, 09:18 PM   #13
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Well I guess that answered that huh? Gotta luv forums.
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Old 11-11-2001, 09:28 PM   #14
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"YOU ASKED"!!!
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Old 11-11-2001, 09:56 PM   #15
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Talking

CX, originally from NY, where?

The term Yankee, if you want the facts, derives from the name of a Dentist, a Dr. Yanker, from Yonkers, NY who was hired by the Union Pacific RR to treat the Chinese laborers working on the railway. Given the primitive condition of dentistry at the time, the best he could do was extract the offending tooth. Unable to pronounce extract correctly, the Chinese soon began asking for a yankee, hence the term.
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