Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-17-2009, 06:49 AM   #1
Mattpetro
Tile and Stone contractor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 8
Copper Penny floor?

Hello everyone.
I recently joined the forum to seek any input on a new project I'm faced with. I'm a tile contractor/installer in N.J. with 13 yrs. experience with all types of materials, i.e. porcelain, natural stone, mosaic, etc.. I have a request from a customer to install a powder room floor (25 sq.ft.) consisting of copper pennies. Cement sub floor. We wish to use black grout and finish the surface with a polyurethane or lacquer to protect the floor and add a smooth, durable finish.
Has anyone out there ever had a similar project?
Should the pennies be set w/ epoxy mortar, or will the alkalinity from the portland eventually corrode the copper?
Poly or lacquer?

Any input from all you fine people would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your time!
Mattpetro is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 05-17-2009, 07:29 AM   #2
Splinter
Kitchen & Bath Remodeler Long Island
 
Splinter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 2,145
I cant comment on corrosion from portland, but use the polyurethane instead of lacquer... It's much more durable.
__________________
Alex
Splinter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 07:34 AM   #3
Shaughnn
Trowel Monkey
 
Shaughnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Kent, Washin'ton
Posts: 11,467
Hi Matt,
Epoxy will likely be the most reliable bond. Since pennies have different metal content from each minting it's probably a good call to avoid cement products entirely. No telling how those various alloys will react.
I don't think that any clear coat is going to give you an advantage though. Eventually, it will wear through and you'll have the problem of repairing it to restore an even finish. Better to let the pennies wear naturally.
So, heads up or tails up?
Shaughnn
Shaughnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 08:40 AM   #4
jgleason
Moderator - Theatre Guy (and computers)
 
jgleason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Weare, NH
Posts: 8,877
For the longest wear and the most natural aging of the copper, try to get pennies minted between 1962-1982. During this period pennies were comprised of 95% copper and 5% zinc. Since 1982 the composition has been 97.5% zinc with only 2.5% copper. Essentially, today's pennies are copper-coated zinc.
jgleason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 08:55 AM   #5
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,598
I'd think epoxy would be the way to go. I might would even rough up one side to help the bond, not sure if it's really necessary.

Post a pitcher when you get it done.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 09:05 AM   #6
Shaughnn
Trowel Monkey
 
Shaughnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Kent, Washin'ton
Posts: 11,467
They would absolutely have to be cleaned of body oils and other grime before installing. Probably a bath in a mild acid, but would require some experimentation.
Shaughnn
Shaughnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 03:25 PM   #7
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 13,010
The floor might be a candidate to a (thick) pour of clear plastic sort of like you sometimes see in a paperweight or tabletops. If it got scratched up, you could buff it down, back to a clear surface. It might end up being quite slippery, though, and especially in a commercial situation, I'd be leary. Might have the same problem with a urethane finish, depending on how thick it was applied.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 04:27 PM   #8
Old World Tile and Marble
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: albany new york
Posts: 1,341
look for a product called liquid glass ive poured it over bar tops can go thick and theirs limited airbubbles
__________________
jason
Old World Tile and Marble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 06:20 PM   #9
Mattpetro
Tile and Stone contractor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 8
Wow. Thanks so much for all your input so quickly! I'm going to do a couple of mock-ups with some different materials and post how the results came out.
Hopefully these trials will not only help me, but anyone faced with a similar situation in the future.

I may throw a nickel in there just to keep things interesting! I'll keep you all posted...

Matt
Mattpetro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 06:34 PM   #10
Trask
Oregon Tile Man
 
Trask's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Astoria Or.
Posts: 5,858
Touchstone T-2000 is what I would use to install it.. I bid one some time ago in "quarters"..It never came round But that's what we bid to use.
__________________
Trask Bergerson
Bergerson Tile and Stone
Astoria, Oregon

http://bergersontile.blogspot.com/
Trask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 10:24 PM   #11
Foochacho
Wood and Tile Contractor
 
Foochacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: IL
Posts: 393
I thought about doing this in my bathroom before. I decided not to because of the cost of the pourable epoxy and the amount of it I would need. My plan was to lay the pennies out thick so they were layered and then pour thick epoxy over it. I was going to frame the room out with 1" x 1" and caulk the bottom so the epoxy stayed in the frame. I would imagine that the boards would then need to be removed to allow for expansion. The only way I can think of to do that is by cutting with a toe kick saw. I was going to trim with base and shoe to cover the gap.

I decided not to do this because of cost (didn't know if it would work or not and didn't want to throw the money down the drain) and finished floor height. My bath floor was already higher than the other floor it met with adding another inch was out of the question.

I originally thought to do this with blue slate landscaping chips (Which are some really cool looking landscaping rocks). If I did that though my finished floor height would of been alot higher after layering the rocks. The rocks are chips so they are flat and not round but they are still 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick a piece.

I found pourable epoxy in five gallon buckets online somewhere. It was cheaper than buying the little bartop kits at the store. Might want to look online for some deals.

Keep us posted with pics. I might try this when I move. More willing to go crazy in a house I plan to stay in for more than a couple of years. Didn't want to spend to much money and time fixing up the one I am currently in.
__________________
Sean
Foochacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 10:28 PM   #12
Foochacho
Wood and Tile Contractor
 
Foochacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: IL
Posts: 393
If you decide not to layer it and lay it flat it would probally be easier to pre lay it in sheets on some mesh with epoxy.
__________________
Sean
Foochacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 11:09 PM   #13
silvercitytile
Registered User
 
silvercitytile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: silver city
Posts: 5,973
Send a message via MSN to silvercitytile
how many pennies in a square foot that would be a cool looking floor
__________________
jeff aka papi chulo. "I'll make you famous!"(William H. Bonney aka Billy The Kid)

Schluter Kerdi and Ditra installer in Southern New Mexico
Castillo Construction
silvercitytile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 11:36 PM   #14
ob1kanobee
Registered User
 
ob1kanobee's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Deland, FL.
Posts: 4,064
Is that kind of floor even legal? I thought you weren't supposed to destroy money like that LOL.
__________________
Ben

Rule number one in life: You go with what you got, imperfections and all.
ob1kanobee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2009, 11:43 PM   #15
The Kid
Registered User
 
The Kid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Snohomish, WA
Posts: 3,098
yep, weird, I always buy beer with my change.
__________________
Jeremy

Cascade Tileworks,llc
Licensed, Bonded & Insured
WA Lic# CASCATL894QA
The Kid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
penny round advice remodelingmom Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 01-21-2009 01:16 PM
Spectralock and penny mosaics HS345 Professionals' Hangout 7 08-22-2007 09:51 PM
anyone ever use a copper pan under a tiled shower floor? DRBEER Tile Forum/Advice Board 10 06-07-2006 10:05 PM
Copper slate floor advice justducky150 Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 03-28-2006 08:01 AM
Penny Tile mik Tile Forum/Advice Board 1 01-02-2006 02:44 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:32 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC