Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:03 AM   #1
JasonRaff
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3
Concrete between the joists?

I am looking to re-tile a small bathroom floor (30 sq ft), house was built in 1920.

From the basement, I can see that the space between the joists has been enclosed using what looks like old floor boards. They then filled the joists with concrete, followed by metal lathe and what appears to be deck mud and then tile. Then there is a second layer of tile, added by the previous owners which looks like they did while heavily intoxicated.... its terrible.

Should I just rip all this out and put down a new subfloor?

Was this a common practice (to fill the joists with concrete)?

Thanks!

- Jason
JasonRaff is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:12 AM   #2
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 13,331
You are looking at a mudbed, a good way to set tile. If you can preserve it, you can tile over it. But, if it gets broken, you'll need to remove it. You could do another one. Note, a mudbed is much more forgiving than the joists with a subfloor. You would need a new subfloor and MIGHT need to reinforce the joists if you don't do another mudbed. It is easier to make a mudbed on top of a subfloor, but you'll end up with a thicker floor than the technique they used. Use the deflection calculator "deflecto" in the blue bar above.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:14 AM   #3
Rob Z
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Jason

That was a common method up through the early sixties. You'll likely find that the tops of your joists are hatcheted to a point, and that they have been butchered in places by the plumber from long ago.

You could demo the upper layer of mud and leave the stuff in between the joists, and then float a relatively thin bed on top of the stuff down in the joists. This might be a bit tricky, depending on what's there.

We usually demo all of it out and strengthen the joists as needed, then follow with plywood subfloor and a mudbed over paper and metal lath.

If you can get it flat enough by scabbing onto the existing joists, then plywood followed by cement board or a membrane such as Ditra or Noble TS would be a bit easier than a mudbed.
  Reply With Quote
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:17 AM   #4
Rob Z
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Jason

Before considering whether to tile over the existing, check to see if there are any cracks, particularly ones that correspond to the locations of the joists (most common over the hatcheted joists I mentioned above).
  Reply With Quote
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:29 AM   #5
JasonRaff
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3
Thanks for the quick replies (at 1am no less!).

I don't think there is any way to save the existing mud bed. I did some exploratory surgery earlier today, and there seem to be some cracks.

Whats the best way to remove it? Rotary hammer?
JasonRaff is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-04-2007, 12:59 AM   #6
P.Dieter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 81
Quote:
Whats the best way to remove it? Rotary hammer?

The love of my life




Burke Bar
__________________
Have fun
Paul


P.Dieter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-07-2007, 09:55 PM   #7
JasonRaff
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3
OK, i decided to rip off all the tile and see what was there.

The cracks I saw before were contained to the small area I started in (go figure) and they were just small surface cracks.

SO now I have a floor with just a few gouges (1/4in deep at most) from removing the old tile. Can I just fill them with thinset and set the tile? I am laying 12x12 marble, and plan to use Custom's "Marble and Granite" modified medium bed thinset.

Does this sound like a viable plan? Anything else I should consider?
JasonRaff is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:36 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC