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Unread 01-07-2003, 12:05 AM   #1
jeryto
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Question knocking out tile over mortar, tiling over laminate and other foolhardy things

I am exhausted and I have barely begun. This bathroom project started with replacing the wall board from an old leak. It then grew to removing the sea foam green tile which ran halfway up the wall. I started with a ball peen hammer only to discover my hands wouldn't hold out against the concrete. I then switched to a pneumatic chisel and have half of the tile down after two days. I am left with how to get the remaining concrete down without hurting myself.

Is there a faster way to do this and still do it on my own?

In addition, I want to tile over the formica around my sink. I do not have a saw and am hesitating with buying any more tools for not being able to justify it to my husband. He just shakes his head at me when I announce a new project. He will help me haul out the broken tile.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 06:23 AM   #2
tileguytodd
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If it makes you feel any better,i'm exhausted just thinking about tearing out a mudset wall
Do you absolutly have to tear this wall out?
The reason it is so difficult to remove,is because it is not meant to be removed. A mudset wall is a wonderful thing and should be kept intact if at all possible.It doesnt get any better than that.
If it gets dinged up removing the tile you can skim coat it with thinset.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 06:37 AM   #3
bbcamp
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You can tile over the formica, but we advise against it. If you have rolled edges (along the front and backsplash), it would be easier to start over with a fresh piece of exteriaor grade plywood (you would have to cut off the rolled edges and backsplash first). But if your laminate top is square edged, then apply a layer of 1/4" CBU everywhere you want tile. Bed the CBU in a layer of thinser, nail or screw the CBU every 4 to 6 inches, then tile on.


A saw is a basic remodeling tool. With the money you will save doing this yourself, you can buy one (or 2)!
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Unread 01-07-2003, 07:28 AM   #4
John Bridge
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Hi Jeanne, Welcome.

Hey listen, if you're gonna be a real bonafide weekend warrior, you're gonna hafta get some tools, girl! That's the whole idea. You take on the projects as an excuse to buy expensive tools.

I'm with Todd. If you can re-use the mortar, that's the way to go. If it must be removed, you need some heavy equipment. We use a 3 lb. maul quite a bit. The electric demo hammer will make it much easier.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 09:10 AM   #5
jeryto
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Wink

I'm slowly filling my tool chest. In fact, for my birthday this last year, I asked for a tool chest to hold all of these assorted toys.

I want to replace the mud wall with wallboard and then do venetian plaster over it.

I'm afraid you all are going to have to explain some things in further detail. For instance, what is CBU?

I have a squared off laminate so I think I'm okay there. I'm apparently not the first homeowner to attack this bathroom but they weren't foolhardy enough to try and remove the tile. In fact, they slipped the sink cabinet right up to the tile without bothering to remove it which leaves me with an half an inch gap between the laminate and the wall. Dare I ask whether I can slip the tile over it?

And what is thinser?
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Unread 01-07-2003, 10:00 AM   #6
Sonnie Layne
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Jeanne,

when I rip out mud walls, I use an electric demo hammer (you can rent them) with the chisel bit. I like to get the pieces out as large as possible and I've found it works much easier and faster if you get under the lath where it's nailed to the studs. Working down the studs (or upward at the top section), you can shear the lathing from the nails and you get large sections a lot faster and easier.

some of the other guys here like to remove the tile and leave the mud. I've found that depends on how well the tile was installed, I've just never had a lot of luck with it in a reasonable amount of time.

CBU, cementitious backer unit, it's what you use for the substrate to install tile on. Several brands. I think you'll find explanation of that in the Liberry (library) forum.

Thinset is the mortar you use to adhere the tile to the substrate. Check the Liberry for that as well.

I wouldn't tile over the laminate/formica countertop. I would recommend you remove the existing countertop, and rebuild with tile in mind. My opinion.

Good luck with your project, keep us posted.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 10:12 AM   #7
jeryto
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I have the chisel hammer which has helped. I still find, even with gloves, that my hands are being beat to death.

Thanks for the definitions.

If I attempt this tear out of the formica. . . how do I do it? Some of it appears to be loose from the board.

This wall is mounted on chicken wire and then attached to studs. The concrete appears to be about 1 1/2 thick. 1/2 inch where the tile attaches and an additional inch of concrete still left after I shear the tile off.

In my earlier attempts with the ball peen have knocked enough holes that there is not any turning back on removal.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 10:31 AM   #8
bbcamp
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Disconnect the sink plumbing (remember to shut off the water) and remove the sink mounting hardware. Remove the sink. Look under the vanity top (inside the cabinet) for any screws that look like they hold the top down and remove them. Starting at the front of the vanity, pull up. Your vanity top should come off of the cabinet. Use it as a pattern for a new plywood top, making any adjustments in the size or shape to make it fit better.


Do a site search for countertops. We have a lot of folks doing them. They're not hard to do. Of course, by the time you finish with the walls, you'll be an expert tile setter, and the countertop will be a piece of cake!
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Unread 01-07-2003, 10:38 AM   #9
jeryto
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Smile

Thanks, I'll keep you posted.
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Unread 01-07-2003, 07:26 PM   #10
John Bridge
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Chicken War

Did you hear her? Some old timey tile setter used chicken war. Where's Gobis?
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Unread 01-07-2003, 10:09 PM   #11
Sonnie Layne
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Ol' timey???

I've never heard of anyone younger than 80 using chiken war!!!

That ain't ol' timey, that's historic! She may need a historic preservation specialist!! ))
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Unread 01-08-2003, 09:48 AM   #12
jeryto
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Talking

My home was built in the 1920s which for Tulsa, is pretty old. This bathroom was an add-on to the original house. I confirmed that when I tore off the molded wallboard to reveal the brick from the original outside. As a matter of fact, they left the original eave jutting into the space about five inches and just enclosed it in a wooden box.
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Unread 01-08-2003, 10:40 AM   #13
Sonnie Layne
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now I'm wondering where the moisture came from...
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Unread 01-08-2003, 12:09 PM   #14
jeryto
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From the roof where it ties from the original part of the house to the add-on. Three roofers later (and one lawsuit) it no longer leaks. It was finally fixed after we changed the flat roof add-on to a pitched variety.
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Unread 01-08-2003, 01:39 PM   #15
Garrett
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Jeanne, sounds like you are discovering the joys and mysteries of Oklahoman construction!!

I've never tackled a mud wall but I keep a sledge hammer handy during any project. I call it the "massager." Cut about 10" or so off the handle so it's easier to swing in tight places.
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