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Unread 09-18-2005, 10:02 PM   #1
Chris McNeal
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grouting brick pavers

Hello to all,
I'll be setting some very pourous brick pavers this week and wonder whats the best method for grouting? These pavers are 1/2 inch thick and very irregular,pitted and pourous. I thought about a grout bag but the grout has to be so runny for that and I dont like to mix my grout that loose. Also are there any tips on how to set these irregular pavers for best visual results?? There curved and bowed and corners knocked off and etc........ just very irregular. Seems like it would be impossible to keep anything straight or square but I'd like to do as neat a job as possible.Any advise would be appreciated and also any tips for speed on this project would be nice. I'm sure it will be a slow go. Thanks Chris.
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Unread 09-18-2005, 11:42 PM   #2
Shaughnn
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Hello Chris,
Mini-brick, as you've described them, are normally set on building fascades so their imperfections aren't noticable. They are also generally grouted with either a mechanical pump (similar to a concrete pump) or by using a grout gun (like a caulking gun except with a removable metal cylinder which is filled with mixed and slaked grout. Both are tedious processes and for large jobs, my employers have normally farmed out that portion to grouting and tuck-pointing firms. For small projects using mini-brick you can use a grout bag after you've pre-soaked the wall to reduce the amount of moisture the mini-brick sucks out of your grout. Let the grout set up in the joint and then knock off the excess with the edge of your trowel. Clean up the joint with a wire brush; no water.
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Unread 09-19-2005, 06:03 AM   #3
Chris McNeal
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Exclamation

Thanks Shaughnn, These are actually floor pavers I think they are called Chicago tile. These are actual bricks sliced in 1/2 inch strips. I'm sure it will be tedious work, I've got about 1300 sf to set and grout. I dont really like the grout bag but that might be my best option.
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Unread 09-19-2005, 06:40 AM   #4
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Ahh, Thin Brick and Mini-Brick are deffinately different animals. From the warping and irregularity you described I thought this was verticle work. A groutbag is gonna be your best shot but you should use a rich mason's mortar, and not a tile grout. You can get colorant for the mortar at masonry supply shops though getting the ratio right for your use might take a batch or two.
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Unread 09-19-2005, 11:40 AM   #5
Chris McNeal
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Cool

Thanks Shaughnn,
could I also use mortar to set the pavers or do I need to use thinset? I was wondering about setting the pavers and grouting in one pass with the same mortar, is this an option ? Thanks , Chris
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Unread 09-19-2005, 06:13 PM   #6
Shaughnn
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Chris,
Yes, Thin-brick can be wet-set with mortar and I'd go so far as to recommend it. By going that route, you can use your setting mixes to experiement with your color ratio, if you are using color.
I used a grout bag on these in front of my house. Though they are full brick, and not thin-brick, the principle is the same.
Best of luck,
Shaughnn
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Unread 09-19-2005, 06:36 PM   #7
Rd Tile
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Is this inside or outside?

These are 1" brick pavers butted, over sand, over an old concrete walkway.
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Unread 09-19-2005, 08:48 PM   #8
Chris McNeal
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Hi Rd, These pavers will be inside. A foyer, kitchen,pantry,dining room and small hallway.
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Unread 09-20-2005, 06:29 PM   #9
Chris McNeal
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Hey Shaughnn, If your still following this thread could you explain to me what a rich masons mortar is? Are you referring to the way I mix the mortar, or a certain kind of mortar?
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Unread 09-20-2005, 06:33 PM   #10
Davestone
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I believe he means to add more masonery cement.or lime,to the sand to keep it from clogging the hole in the grout bag.He's probably rocking the new baby or sumthin.
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Unread 09-20-2005, 06:56 PM   #11
Chris McNeal
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Thanks dave, could I get some advise on what kind of ratio I need to use to mix the mortar. water:sand:cement; I've never used masons mortar. I'm accustomed to thinset mortar and regular ole tile grout. Thanks for the help. Chris
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Unread 09-20-2005, 07:42 PM   #12
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Hi Chris,
Sorry to have abandoned you, I'm been a Nyquil zombie all day. A richer mix will have just a touch more cement added to it, to make it creamier. To a 90 bag of Mason's mortar, I'd add about 2 Big Gulp cups of Portland cement and mix it all together dry before adding water. And add slightly more water to make it creamy without peaks as you mix it.
Best of luck, from beyond,
Shaughnn
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Unread 09-20-2005, 07:47 PM   #13
Chris McNeal
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Thanks shaughnn, does this mean that I dont need any sand? Sorry for the silly questions but when you dont know you dont know.

Chris
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Unread 09-21-2005, 05:56 AM   #14
Chris McNeal
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just bumping up!! I'm still wandering about the sand in the mortar? Do I need sand or just masons mortar and portland cement? Seems like a little sand would be in order here? Thanks chris
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Unread 09-21-2005, 06:04 AM   #15
Shaughnn
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Chris,
"Mason's mortar" is pre-mixed with sand and cement and lime, at the correct ratio for setting brick. You should see a ratio like "5:2:1", or something similar on the bag, but it will also say list the contents. "Mason's cement" is another term for Portland cement and that's a product that is pure cement and contains no sand or lime. Hope that helps clear things up for you?
Shaughnn
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