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Unread 06-11-2007, 09:30 AM   #1
elsieCat
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Join Date: Apr 2004
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tips for working with Silestone Tile?

I am planning to make two bathroom counters with silestone tile and I would greatly appreciate any tips, caveats, advice, leads, whatever else anyone who has worked with it would be kind enough to share.

Vanessa has already shared some with me in PMs but I also thought it would be good to have an actual thread with silestone-tile-related information collected in one place for the benefit of anyone who comes later.

One question to start off with: the only installation instructions I have seen concern installation over concrete slab with thinset, as in flooring. I plan to put it over plywood and durock, with thinset. I will be ordering the 24x24 size so as to avoid any groutlines on the surface of the counters (there is no greater run than 12" on either side of either sink). I'll run some redguard over the durock and up the wall to waterproof the plane change.

My question: is it then possible to treat the pieces, e.g. the horizontal counter piece and the vertical front piece, in the same way slabs are treated and *epoxy* them together at the joint edges as I set the bottoms of the pieces into thinset? Silestone slabs are joined with a color-matched epoxy, like granite. I would love to be able to reduce a groutline there if possible to just an epoxy line--much thinner and just as strong, I would think, or Silestone would not use it to join slabs. I would still be using caulk at the plane changes to the wall. I can live with a groutline, but if using epoxy is possible, I would prefer it.

Thanks in advance for any sharing of lessons learned etc. regarding working with this material.
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Unread 06-11-2007, 07:01 PM   #2
Davestone
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That epoxy at the edge is to laminate two pieces together to hide the underside of the slab where it meets the countertop.You could do this,if you want to build up the edge to give it the appearance, but you'd need it to overhang the face pieces.If you're just epoxy in them for the strength sake, no need, unless you just like the look...by the way Granquartz<or Akemi has the epoxy, with a color set to mix any color you want.Treat silestone like granite, and you're fine,but be careful if you try to do any polishing or fancy edging, it won't turn out like natural stone.
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Unread 06-13-2007, 04:37 AM   #3
elsieCat
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Thanks, Dave! Yes, that's what I was planning on doing, overhanging the face pieces. I'll check Granquartz for the epoxy (and the other company too). I also found Integra adhesives, that are color matched to the particular silestone color...looks relatively user-friendly--do you have any experience with Integra?

And another question: you say that polishing isn't like polishing granite-but I've seen polished silestone edges--how do I do it? \(edit--I can't sleep so I might as well study) O.K., I've been reading some at a stone website about edge-polishing ES...but I would greatly appreciate if you would share what you do personally.

Thanks again.
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Last edited by elsieCat; 06-13-2007 at 05:58 AM.
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Unread 02-26-2008, 11:40 AM   #4
lkb619
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Polishing silestone edge

Does anyone have any expirience with polishing the edge of the silestone tile. As far as I can see, there isn't any matching bullnose for the edge of the backshlash, and I'm not sure how to make the tile edge itself look finished.

Any help would be appreciated!
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Unread 08-11-2009, 07:03 PM   #5
eagleheart
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profiling Silestone

Well I've been lurking and learning from the forum for months in order to prepare for our 24" Silestone kitchen countertop install. Hi all - this is my first post and I thank everyone for all the info you've shared. Hopefully I can return the favor some?
After 12 wks waiting for the tile it finally arrived from Spain and I promptly started to put a 1/4 round on a few tiles. So I can tell you what I've learned. Most importantly, what I've deduced! The epoxy burns if you don't polish at the right speed and water supply. Seems you can also overwork it and it will burn the epoxy. But it appears it can be done. What I've finished looks professional in my opinion.
I think I bit off a lot - having never worked with tile before and starting on engineered stone! But I'm taking with me experience from stained glass and polishing semi-conductor chips to get me through this one.
I've also rounded out some cuts to wrap tight around the glass stove top so to make it flush mount with the tile - using my diamond drum bit from stained glass. Next is to make the cuts and round out the corners to fit the Silgranite sink for flush mount.
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