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Unread 08-15-2009, 08:06 AM   #1
Renko
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Renko's Bathroom Remodel

Hi all. Been lurking for a while (a few years back and now again for a couple weeks). Great forum. I'm starting a bathroom remodel and have some questions. I figure I'll just keep all the questions in one thread on the remodel. My questions are...

1. How do you finish the joint between CBU and drywall? Do you just treat it as you would a CBU-CBU joint?

2. I have a situation where I cannot tile to the edge of the CBU and it will be difficult to put a thin piece of sheetrock where the tile ends. So, I plan to install hardibacker, over the whole area, but not tile to the edge. I know I can paint hardibacker, but how does it look? Will I be able to make it blend in with the sheetrock wall? I'll prime it, then texture it, then paint it. Sheetrock is peeled wallpaper at the moment, so it will undergo the same finishing process.

3. My subfloor is 3/4" OSB with 1/4" plywood glued on top (linoleum over that). I've peeled the linoleum because I didn't feel it was good enough in some areas to tile over. If I can scrape off the adhesive can I just put 1/4" hardibacker on top of the plywood? I can't remove the 1/4" plywood easily because it's glued to the OSB and peeled some OSB layers off with it when I tried to remove a small piece. Tile store guy said get rid of the OSB, but from reading this forum it seems ok to me and cutting out the OSB would leave me with unsupported sections (cantilevered over joists). Anything else I need to consider? Do I need moisture barrier? Tile guy says don't bother.

Thanks for your help. I know I'll have more questions, but this should help me get started.
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Unread 08-15-2009, 08:50 AM   #2
Brian in San Diego
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David,

Welcome to the John Bridge Forums! I'm happy to see you got your name in signature line and you are onboard with the "one project, one thread" policy.

1. I think that joint could be treated that way. I guess it would depend on where it is. If you are talking at the height of the shower arm for instance that's how I would treat it and then extend the tile over the joint so you only have drywall showing.

2. Painting hardiebacker might look lousy IMO. If I HAD to do it then I would skim it with drywall mud (in non-wet areas), sand it, prime it and paint it.

3. I'm very sorry to report the 1/4" has to come up. There is no place for 1/4" plywood in a tile installation. It just isn't structurally stable enough. Also you do want to find out if your joist structure will support a tile installation. If it's dimensional lumber then use the Deflecto tool in the dark blue toolbar above. If they are engineered trusses you may have to go back to the manufacturer to check with them. If it's impossible to get the 1/4" up we can guide you through replacing the OSB. If you do pull up chunks of the OSB there are patching materials that can be used to smooth t all out.

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Unread 08-15-2009, 09:29 AM   #3
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Thanks for the response Brian.

The seam is a vertical seam on each short side of the tub. I would have to leave the tile short in what I was planning. I may try to think how to put the seam where I want it (probably means adding another stud - not too big a deal).

Is there a way to find out my joist structure without removing the OSB? I'll try removing the 1/4", but the OSB will definitely need something to fill in the pulled out layers. Can you describe how the OSB could be removed and new floor placed in without worry about cantilevered sections? Can I just put in some 2x4's to support the new subfloor in those areas? I read another thread where the guy seemed to have the same issue (2" and 5" gaps near walls) and his fix seemed a bit complicated, or at least more than I want to get into.
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Unread 08-19-2009, 06:53 AM   #4
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This thread fell down the list quick - that'll teach me to post on Sat morning when everyone is probably working on their projects. One more question...

My tub lip on each of the short ends is about 1/4" from the wall studs. How do you accomodate this? I have to keep the CBU in line with the mating sheetrock, which prevents me from overlapping the lip. Should I just butt it up to the top of the lip and overhang the bottom row of tiles?
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Unread 08-22-2009, 07:11 AM   #5
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Unread 08-25-2009, 03:07 PM   #6
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Hi All,

Could really use some help on this - at least the last question (I'm think I'm ok with the questions in my original post. The situation is actually worse on one tub end. The stud where the sheetrock will meet CBU was shaved down by 1/4". On the other corner (tub end to back wall) the studs are normal and the CBU can fit over the tub lip. Looking at the leftover caulk on the tub what I guess the installer did was overlap the greenboard 1/2 - 2/3 of the length of the lip, then notch the greenboard so it rested on top of the lip the remainder of the way. This then would bend that 1/4" to the shaved down stud so it mates up flush with the sheetrock. That's all I can think of doing as well. Thoughts?

Another question I couldn't find through searching was what grout spacing is required on pencil rails? I think I'll leave space above and below, but do you butt them together lengthwise or is grout required here as well?
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Unread 01-30-2010, 01:54 PM   #7
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Shower valve plumbing

Hi all,

Hoping you can help. I'm renovating a bathroom and am currently installing a new shower valve. I have a question about the plumbing. I'd show a photo, but I'm home alone and can't find my wife's camera, so I'll describe as best I can.

What I have now is 1/2" hot and cold lines coming up from the floor that run into a 1/2" x 1/2" x 3/4" (maybe 1") tees. The 3/4" is on the run. The 1/2" on each branch runs to my shower valve. The 3/4" lines run up about 2' and are capped. What are these lines for? I'm assuming they act as some kind of buffer - maybe to help prevent water hammer. The reason I ask is with my new valve I need to relocate piping and if these pipes are unnecessary it would make my job much easier if I can just remove them. I'll try to post a photo later, but if anyone has some thoughts now, I'd love to hear them.

Thanks.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:23 PM   #8
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Sometimes extra pipe is run to cut down on the pipes knocking or "water hammer" like you said. without a picture though, i can't be too sure.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:25 PM   #9
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Yes you can remove them but they are a real nice touch and a sign of a job well done. You can shrink the size down to half inch, they can be elbowed off out of the way.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:27 PM   #10
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Ok, here's a photo...
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:31 PM   #11
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Thanks for the responses. I need to move the left pipe more to the left (towards the stud). I will try to keep them, but may downsize the left pipe.

I also need to move the new valve out towards the shower wall. Going to be a bit of a challenge, but I think I can manage. Off to Lowe's to get some parts.

Cheers,
David
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:41 PM   #12
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question is, Do you need water hammer/ arrestors for a shower valve, I've hear some say yes and many say no, any one have some input?
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:43 PM   #13
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Those look like water hammer arrestors, old style, a sort of shock absorber for the action of turning on the valve with the increase of water flow. Over time, they fill with water and their effect is negated. There are commercially available units, required by code at quick-acting valves like clothes washer, dishwasher, ice maker, etc... If the pipes are adequately supported and braced against movement, in your case not needed.

http://www.plumbingsupply.com/waterhammerarresters.html
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Unread 01-30-2010, 04:29 PM   #14
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I wondered how effective they'd be if they're just pipe that will eventually be water-filled. The arrestors have a piston to isolate the air from the water.

So, do I really need these or arrestors? The few photos I've seen of valve installs do not have them.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 04:41 PM   #15
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Do you have pipes rattling around in the area of the bathroom? Is the laundry room nearby? The kitchen? If yes, an arrestor may help. Some.

Better would be to secure the pipe against movement and install arrestors at the specific locations listed in my above post. Shower valves don't open or close fast enough to cause hammer with properly secured pipe. Note that arrestors are only helpful if installed very close to those specific valves that really need em. Use a commercially available unit(s) if you go this route. There are many different configurations for installing into existing plumbing.
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