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Unread 07-14-2008, 09:23 PM   #16
russ fulks
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Wow!

So many awesome responses!

First let me say that I am indeed getting some more bids. I have 2 more companies coming out next week to take a look (1 a concrete company and another a landscape company). I've been having a hard time finding people that do this type of work in the yellow pages. My wife works from home so getting people out for an estimate is not a problem.

smschulz, I agree! No way I'm mixing this 1 bag at a time.

cx / hammy, so do you do a monolithic slab / footing and put the poly under it all?

scuttlebuttrp, we definitely do not have the room for a truck to backup on our side yard That would be much easier. Though I did do the calculation and using a Georgia Buggy would only take about 3 trips to get all the concrete transferred from front to back. Not tooooo bad.

jdjanka, that does sound like an incredible price! A little over $4/sq ft sounds like a heck of a deal. I figure it'll cost me somewhere between $5-700 to do it myself with the cost of concrete, form boards, rebar, and tool rental. If I could get someone in the $1k range I'd jump all over it.

Davy, I'd love to do stamped and stained concrete, but there's just not enough room on the existing patio to do it and I don't want to have mis-matched sections. Also, recovering the existing patio would certainly put me way overbudget.

Another comment / question. My existing patio was poured directly on the dirt in the back yard, no excavation was done. Then the sod was laid so I currently have a drop off from the existing patio to the grass as shown in the first pic. The second pic shows that there is not much patio under the existing grass. I don't anticipate needing to dig out much of the dirt and I'm wondering just how flat the pour area needs to be? Do I need to really work it or just get it close (assuming I do not use any crushed stone and do use a poly barrier).

Thanks again for all of the great info so far! I'm learning a lot as I go along Even if I do end up going with a contractor, I now have the knowledge that I need to evaluate the folks giving me estimates.

Russell

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Unread 07-15-2008, 05:56 AM   #17
Davestone
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You'll need to take the grass out,and any tree roots.The concrete under the grass may just be cement that ran under the forms.It helps to run string lines across where you're pouring, then measure down ever so often to keep a uniform 4",otherwise you may wind up using way more concrete or having a 2" pour that cracks up.
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Unread 07-15-2008, 11:27 AM   #18
kevinrmac
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As an alternative to a pumper, many rental place have "power buggys" for moving concrete. Basically really big motorize wheelbarrow with hydraulic dump. We used 2 these for my cousins 180sqft patio. His was poured with 16" footers with the anticipation of closing it in at some point in the future, so it was a bit more concrete than normal. you could probably do 1 buggy for a simple 4" pour. He hired a guy to do the finishing for him. Getting a nice smooth finish is the hardest part of the whole project. It's as much of an art as it is skill.

They go by several different names, but generally look like this.
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Unread 07-15-2008, 04:01 PM   #19
russ fulks
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kevinrmac,

I've seen the device you're referring to called a Georgia Buggy and I'll definitely be using 1 of them instead of a pumper. They rent for ~$100 a day and it would only take 4 trips for me to move all the concrete from the front to the back which is reasonable.

I am not toooooo concerned with getting a smooth finish as I am planning on doing a brush stroke finish so that it's anti-slip. Having said that, I can only imagine how hard it's going to be to get a good finish.

Russell

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Unread 07-15-2008, 04:49 PM   #20
Rd Tile
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Davy, install pavers, if you do it yourself, you can take your sweet time, will cost less than a stamped job and last a lifetime.
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Unread 07-15-2008, 07:41 PM   #21
matman
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Pavers are nice. A couple of years back I was working on this big house up on a hill. L shaped, so you drove right into what would be normally the front yard, with the front entrance ahead and the garages to the right. But this whole central area was a big circular design made of pavers. Really nice.

Are pavers an option Russell?
Looks nicer than concrete in my opinion.
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Unread 07-16-2008, 06:27 AM   #22
russ fulks
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I originally thought of pavers, but my concerns were 2-fold.

1) The primary reason for not using pavers is because I have an existing 25X15 patio that this will be adjoining and was concerned that it would look weird to have a section off to the side made up of pavers.

2) A less important reason not to go with pavers is because adding the new area is meant to give the kids more room to ride their small trikes etc. in the backyard. I know this is only going to last for a few years, but my thought was that pavers don't really work well because they are not a smooth surface. Good friends of ours have pavers in the back and their son can't ride his little ride-on toys because of the grooves between the stones.

I have another company coming out Tuesday to give me an estimate. We'll see how it goes.

Russell
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