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Unread 10-14-2020, 10:14 AM   #1
EDDY IN MONTREAL
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Adhesive used for laying down a Quartz sill plate

Hello everyone.

I bought a quartz counter and a shower sill plate from a Granite/Quartz store. The installer installed only the counter but not the sill plate. He said that it's your tiler that would install it. I explained to him that I am the installer. He said to use thinset. (not sure)!

My shower curb is wrapped in a Schulter Kerdi membrane. What type of adhesive would I use to lay down my quartz sill plate to the membrane? Can I just use a clear silicone caulking?

My shower sill plates are in an L shape using 2 pieces of quartz.
The quartz sill plates measure 74x5" and 32x5"

Many thanks again for the support that this forum brought to me over the years.

Sincerely
Eddy
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Unread 10-14-2020, 10:36 AM   #2
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Modified thinset. I'd sometimes rough up back, depending on my mood. Like tile, you want as close to 100% coverage as you can get without having it ooze into grout lines.

Just say no to silicone caulk...

And by the way, don't forget slope to drain, which makes for a compound miter at junction of perpendicular pieces.
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Unread 10-15-2020, 07:09 AM   #3
EDDY IN MONTREAL
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Hello everyone,

Thank you Peter for your answer.

On top of the Kerdi membrane, would I use modified or unmodified thinset to set my quartz sill plate in place?
Also the underside of the quarts is pretty smooth. When you say to ruff it up, what do you mean by that and what would you use do to it?
The quartz is 1 1/4" thick. What would be the suggested trowel size to use?

Why not a silicone or a similar adhesive product?

Thanks
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Unread 10-15-2020, 08:16 AM   #4
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Yes to modified thinset bonding curb topper to curb. Versabond probably being my most used.

I have a diamond disc for a 5" grinder that's like looks a miniature wet saw blade. I'll just skate it around on back a little, holding at slight angle, in a random pattern. This isn't precision work and just gives a little tooth for the mortar. If you spend more than a minute it's probably too much...really.

A 1/4"x1/4" trowel should work fine. I mask off tile edges because neatness counts and it saves me cleanup. In the photos I used tile spacers to make topper dead level and give me proper spacing off vertical tile. Figure this out before mortar. My curb top is sloped too.

FYI, your stone is 3 centimeters. Almost all stone and engineered stone are either 2cm or 3cm. It's just the standard of the industry.
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Unread 10-15-2020, 08:42 AM   #5
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Hi Peter,

Great info and beautiful pictures. Thanks for the advice. I will be installing it next week. I feel more confident now. The only thing I didn't calculate when I ordered the sill plate is an expansion joint up against the tiled wall. Is that important. I was planning on butting it up against the tile. I noticed in your pictures an expansion joint.

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Unread 10-15-2020, 08:49 AM   #6
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It's not really an expansion joint per se, but does allow for differential movement between dissimilar material and changes of plane. I treat it like any other change of plane and use 100% silicone caulk, color matched to grout.
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Last edited by Carbidetooth; 10-15-2020 at 09:17 AM.
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Unread 10-15-2020, 09:24 AM   #7
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I'd use white mortar for any natural stone. Gray can discolor it over time.

Also, while it's not necessary, you could cut a few grooves in the backside of that stone for the mortar to bite into. Just 1/16" or so would work. And make sure to flat-trowel the back of the stone before setting it in the troweled mortar.

I'll second the suggestion for sloping the threshold. I usually have it sloped at the initial stages of building, but if I need to adjust that either way, I do that with a little more/less mortar.

For what it's worth, the threshold is usually the very last piece I set, so I don't risk pushing it out of place after setting.
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Unread 10-15-2020, 09:28 AM   #8
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Kevin and Peter THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
Very much appreciated.

Sincerely
Eddy )
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Unread 12-13-2020, 12:16 PM   #9
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Hello everyone,

Had some family and work issues, so I still have not laid down my quartz sill plates around my shower. The glass shower panels will be sitting upon the quartz after installation.
I am now ready but still need some more advice. The quartz retailer told me to put some epoxy between the two joints butted up together. The set time is 5 minutes. Not much time for me to do all the leveling and installation since I am not a fast worker.
I found another product that has a set time of 60 minutes. It's called Liquid Nails Marble. It's good for marble, granite, and other solid surface materials.

What are your suggestions about joining butted ends together?

Thank you!
Sincerely,
Eddy
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Unread 12-13-2020, 12:58 PM   #10
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Hmmm, my first thought is that something gunned out of a tube is not gonna act the same as two part epoxy, although I've never used the liquid nails stuff you mention.

My second thought would be why glue them at all? Dry fit with desired gap at miter, set toppers, shim to where I want and walk away. I treat joint like a change of plane and later fill with color matched silicone. I may have grouted one or two, but never considered gluing them together.
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Unread 12-13-2020, 02:02 PM   #11
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For setting the pieces, I’d still use a modified mortar that doesn’t require air drying to cure. Versabond is fine.

Your quartz installer is used to installing countertops where all joints are easily visible. When they install epoxy in the joints like he mentioned, it is after the slabs are completely set. They leave their desired gap between the slabs and then mix up their color-matched epoxy and use a putty knife to force it into the joint (doesn’t necessarily go very deep into the 3cm gap). After it sets up firm (not hard), they carefully slice away the excess epoxy from the top with a razor blade in a shearing motion. Okay, you could do this if you like. You can buy Akemi knife-grade epoxy and colorants to do as they do.

Or you could simply use a color-matched silicone. If you do this, you don’t want an air gap in a joint that could collect water over time. So this joint needs to be filled. Rarely is filling such a deep gap with silicone recommended. But you’ll have a hard time filling a 3cm gap by forcing silicone from the top. So, if you do this method, I’d suggest caulking the bottom 1/2 of the joint after the first curb piece is set. Then set the second piece and squeeze the joint to its final width. After the quartz is set and the silicone in the bottom of the joint is hardened, I’d fill the top of the joint and allow the silicone to over-fill the joint. After that has cured, I’d use a fresh razor blade to shave away the excess silicone in a shearing motion for a clean, neat joint.

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Unread 12-14-2020, 11:19 AM   #12
EDDY IN MONTREAL
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Hi Tool Guy and Peter,

Thank you so much for your replies.

Unfortunately, I didn't allow for an expansion joint.
I think I am going just to use 100% clear silicone joining the two quartz pieces together and at the ends that meet up against the tiled wall.
Once the mortar has set, I think I should be good to go. Fingers crossed.
Gluing the joint just doesn't make any sense once I had read your reviews.
The jointed quartz pieces are at the back of the shower and most probably no water will ever hit there.
Here are 2 pictures of it dry fitted together. The plastic on the floor will be to catch any mortar that drops on it.

Sincerely
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Unread 12-14-2020, 12:33 PM   #13
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Eddy, it looks like you're committed to it at this point, but the pictured butt joint is not ideal as it dictates a level installation of topper to keep things in alignment.

In a perfect world, top of curb would b sloped to pan and every subsequent layer would be as well. At the very least you'd want the finished top, whether tile or cap, sloped to drain, which would require a miter at the corner. Technically a compound miter.

Flat curb top will collect water, and may even leak under door or fixed glazing. And by the way, you can cut the material on a wet saw if you have one, so clearance at wall and butt joint would not be out of reach.

At the very least, I'd say you wanna make sure your topper doesn't slope to outside of shower.
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Unread 12-14-2020, 05:14 PM   #14
EDDY IN MONTREAL
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Hi Peter,

You are absolutely right! I screwed up.
I can however slope the long piece slightly. On my iPhone bubble level, I can slope it inwards by 1.6. My problem then is the shorter piece would not align up flush on the two upperparts. There would be a slight lip at the joint. Barely noticeable once it's filled with caulking.
I do have a tile wet saw. Cutting a straight cut should be no problem.
Making a mitered corner is a problem since I would have to order another short piece of quartz and I am not sure they still have that color.
Is 1.6 bubble slope acceptable? Is it too much or too little.
Any ideas on what I can do?

Sincelery
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Unread 12-14-2020, 05:52 PM   #15
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Eddy, as with all horizontal surfaces in a wet area, your curb should slope a minimum of 1/4" per horizontal foot. More on a curb top is better.

'Fraid I've got no idea what 1.6 on your level might mean.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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