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Unread 10-01-2020, 04:27 PM   #61
zinctoo
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Hey guys,

The window in this bathroom had 4x6" radius bullnose ceramic tile installed on the sill, which I busted out when I removed the surrounding drywall. It was attached to the concrete frame of the window with some kind of thick cement product.

I bought enough radius bullnose to replace this which matches the new color of the bathroom. I have some type M brick mortar left over from building the curb. Can I use this mortar as a setting bed for this tile in the window sill?

As always, thank you in advance!
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Unread 10-01-2020, 04:56 PM   #62
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I'd need to see the application to answer definitively, Skyler, but if it's a fat-mud application and not a bonding mortar application you're talking about, yes, the Type M would work. See again Post #31.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-01-2020, 05:04 PM   #63
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Here are some pictures of the sill and the new tile.
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Unread 10-01-2020, 07:07 PM   #64
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This is in your shower?
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Unread 10-01-2020, 09:30 PM   #65
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It's in the bathroom but not in the shower. It's about two feet away from the shower along the same wall.
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Unread 10-01-2020, 09:48 PM   #66
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OK, if it's in a dry area you can probably get by putting some fat-mud over some poly and lath there. That's not gonna appear in any standard, of course.

You're tiling the wall or you just making a tile stool there?
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Unread 10-01-2020, 10:15 PM   #67
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Not planning on tiling the wall, just paint. Tile stool? I'm not familiar with that, but I'm just planning on tiling the inside window sill. All the other windows in the house have tiled window sills and I'd like it to match.
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Unread 10-01-2020, 10:35 PM   #68
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What we see in your photo is the window sill, Skyler, the rough sill. What you'll be adding is the window stool.

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Unread 10-02-2020, 07:11 AM   #69
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Nice, that's great, thank you! I learn something every day
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Unread 10-23-2020, 01:01 PM   #70
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CX, boy time flies, but I'll have time to work on the window stool this weekend. I've got a follow up question about what you said about fat-mud over poly and lath.

Where would I put the poly? Does the poly go onto the sill, then lath over that, then fat mud and tile on top of that?
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Unread 10-24-2020, 07:17 AM   #71
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Yup, the poly is to prevent the framing from drawing the moisture out of the mud, and the lath adds strength to the mud. So, poly, lath, mud.
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Unread 10-26-2020, 08:28 AM   #72
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I've got a design question for anyone following along that has an opinion. When I built my shower curb (3 2x4"s, lath, plus fat mud) I built it about 5 1/2" wide at its widest. Unfortunately, the curb varies and its verticals are not perfectly plumb. When I built it, I troweled on the mud and attached a form, which was my mistake (the sides of the form were not plumb). I did not realize this until recently, after I'd tiled everything except the curb.

I had planned to install a piece of solid carrara marble to the top of the curb, and below it use our regular wall tile. You might already see my problem: cuts of marble for shower curbs are sold in standard 6" widths. The piece of marble that I purchased, which is 6" wide, is too narrow. The top of the tiles will stick out at least 1/4" when attached with thinset. This won't work: the tops of these tiles are unglazed, and even if they were glazed, it just looks bad, bad.

To allow for thinset (2 x 1/8"), tile (2 x 1/4"), and a little bit of overlap, I need 6 1/2" wide marble. Unfortunately, it seems that no one manufactures marble curb tops any wider than 6" -- no one that I've been able to find. My only option for solid marble seems to be to have something custom fabricated. The one shop local to me wants to sell me an entire slab from which they'd cut the curb top and this would run me well over $1,000. I asked about remnants but they either ignored the question or didn't have any (they're not very helpful).

Has anyone found themselves in this situation before? Does anyone know of any stone shops in the southeast that do custom marble fabrication, that readily have remnant pieces and that are willing to work with folks?

I think I have a few options for solving this:

1. Get someone to custom fabricate a 6 1/2" curb top for me.
2. Use carrara marble tile to either wrap the entire curb or just tile the top
3. Use wall tile to wrap the curb. Unfortunately this tile is "wavy" and I'm concerned about installing a shower door on it. Plus, it doesn't come in bullnose, so we'd need to use quarter-round to finish the edges (the same quarter-round that I'll be using to finish the outside edge of the shower walls). In general I'm concerned about its delicateness, since it's wall tile and not floor tile. Can it hold up to me occasionally stepping on it for the next 20 years?
4. Attach the wall tiles to the side of the curb with a heaping amount of thinset, to bring them out past the marble top's width, and finish off the top where the marble meets the tile with a piece of quarter-round. This would make the total width of the curb about 7".

I know I've thrown a lot of info out there, but I'm sort of spinning my wheels unable to make a decision so I'd appreciate any input that anyone might have. I've attached a photo which might help give context to these questions. Note that I have a piece of marble sitting on top of the curb, but this is the too-small piece, but this will hopefully give you an idea of what my original design was.

As always, thank you in advance.
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Unread 10-31-2020, 06:55 AM   #73
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Don't know if you've already sorted this, but if it were mine I would only consider having a piece custom made.

You're best bet for doing so would be to visit the shops. They ALL have remnants. You could expand your options by considering a material other than marble, perhaps in a contrasting color. If they don't have some thing in the 6'length you need you could consider using two 3' pieces with a grout joint in between. Not ideal, but not terrible either.
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Unread 10-31-2020, 08:08 AM   #74
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I’m having a countertop shop (a fairly high end one) cut my curb top. They had a large remnant area that I could walk through and choose from. Not sure if there was any marble there, but there was a ton of beautiful quartz and granite. Literally they had at least 3-4 hundred pieces, maybe more.

My quartz piece will be 57 inches long, 5 3/4 wide, 1 1/4 deep.

30 bucks.

No, I couldn’t believe it either. That’s just cut and me picking it up, it’s not installed, but I was expecting 1-2 hundred. True, it’s not marble, but there’s a lot of quartz out there that looks a lot like marble! Good luck!
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Unread 01-05-2021, 04:42 PM   #75
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After many months, I've finally finished this project! I wanted to thank everyone who helped me on this forum, especially CX! I thought I'd share some pics of the finished project and add some commentary.

The first pics are of the shower and the niche. The other pics are of the curb, and you can see some of the floor tile that I did as well.

I'm actually incredibly proud of how the curb turned out. As I wrote in my previous post, I built the curb too wide and the standard size marble that you can buy as a curb topper didn't fit. I talked to the only real stone shop in town about making a custom carrara curb and the price they quoted me was just crazy. To create one from a castoff they quoted me over $400. For better or worse, they did not have any marble that matched what I was looking for. The only alternative was to buy an entire slab which was well over $1,000. In both cases, the stone was 1 inch think or so (countertop thickness) which I thought would look inappropriate.

Ultimately, I decided to buy 18"x18" honed carrara marble tiles and cut them down into smaller tiles. I gave the edges of these custom tiles (along the top) 45º bevels and tiled the whole thing. The local stone shop and a separate local bath shop both gave me grief when I said that I was considering tiling the curb, but I think this came out looking really great! I think they must have just misunderstood what I had in mind.

I don't know if you can tell in the pics, but the caulk color is just a slightly different color than the grout. The silicone caulk I used is Mapei Mapesil T 100% silicone which is color matched to the Mapei "white" grout I used, but it came out looking just slightly more yellow. This entire shower was built using Mapei products, and I've really enjoyed working with them, but the slight color difference in the silicone caulk is my only complaint. Maybe this is unavoidable, just given the obvious differences between silicone and cement.

CX (or another moderator), can you change the subject of this thread to "Do it Yourself (if you must)" ? I have learned a heck of a lot during this project. I really wanted to have a sense of accomplishment from building this shower, and I do indeed have that feeling of accomplishment. I also wanted to save money. However, building a shower is a *ton* of work, much more than I realized going into this.

I'm really proud of how this turned out but if you're going to tackle it yourself, you really have to be prepared to put in the work to learn and to do. I did save a lot of money, but if you can afford to hire this out, and you don't have a burning desire to learn about tilesetting (and plumbing), you should really consider whether this is something you want to do yourself or not. Take the time that you'd spend reading the Michael Byrne book and asking questions on this forum, and try to find a good local title guy/gal instead :-p.

Anyway, thanks again to everyone who helped me! I really appreciate it. Maybe I'll be back here next year when it's time to redo my guest bathroom!
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