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Old 08-13-2018, 08:24 PM   #61
iownme
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i have another idea.
say the gap is 1 3/8 wide and 3/8" deep
cut a piece of wood trim board to that dimension the length of the wall for each wall.
stick those into the gaps.
Next, cut same dimensions with same trim wood and stick that to the ceiling against the wall trim, then fill in the ceiling with the tile and paint the trim either white or a color to compliment the tile or the room
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Old 08-13-2018, 08:28 PM   #62
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You should be able to pop those tiles off and replace them, but the longer you wait the harder it will be.
Have you considered a crown molding of some sort?
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Old 08-13-2018, 10:52 PM   #63
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Changing shower design

I have been looking at pictures of showers with decorative borders. I think i will see if they can remove the top two rows of tiles they installed. Then i can put a 3 inch mosaic border about 18 inches down from the ceiling. then finish the tiles. It would still leave smaller pieces on the top row, but more like 3-4 inches instead of an inch. Certainly hadn’t planned on any kind of border, but it might solve the problem and be more pleasing to look at. Just want to be sure they can get those tiles off without damaging the cement board or leaving a big thin set mess. I would even settle for just one row coming off and having the border about 12 inches from the ceiling.

The only other option is leave tile as is, put the 3 inch border, then finish with the 4 inch tile pieces. Not crazy about it being that high up but may be the only choice if getting those tiles off is not an option.

Will see what they say in the morning.
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:24 AM   #64
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Rob, 3-4 inches is much better than 1 inch. They didn't mention this to you until the wall was up because they didn't know about it. Some simple measuring would have told them this long before they even had half the wall tiled. I like measuring before any tile goes up. I want to know what I'm going to have at the top and sides, at least approximately.

Installers tend to do the same type work regardless of where or who they are working for. Them knowing about your OCD won't change what their work will look like.
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Old 08-14-2018, 11:50 AM   #65
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Tile decision

No, they didn't mention to me till after entire back wall was tiled. I was out for a couple of hours and came back to the situation. People like you (and me) would have "dry fitted" or at least measured and figured it out before starting. But what's done is done.

Here is an interesting addendum. This 1968 shower was already re-modeled once in 2009 by different people (used drywall, hence the re-do now). Fortunately, I took pictures of the "before" prior to demo and looked at them this morning. Guess what? Similar small strip of tile is at the ceiling. So two different contractors/tile people ended up with the same issue. These will be smaller strips, especially on one wall, but short of tearing out a bunch of stuff and re-designing, it is our only option. Just did not want to do some kind of diagonal/pattern/border "fix" cause I think that would just draw attention up. So they are in there finishing the top row as I type.

With time, I think we won't even notice it. Or at least we won't care cause it will just be done!

So appreciative of all the dialogue with everyone as we have gone through this process. Such a stressful time. Oh, and so much money....
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Old 08-14-2018, 01:38 PM   #66
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Well, your OCD may not be that bad if you didn't remember that small cut at the top of your old shower . My shower is 23 years old and without going in there and looking, I can't tell you what size cut is at the ceiling. I bet it's bigger than 1 inch but I can't remember and I'm in there every day. So, you're probably right, once it's in, you'll be okay with it. I just know how some people are and they wouldn't be fine with it so planning ahead is a good thing.

Are you still using the plastic curb?
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Old 08-14-2018, 02:26 PM   #67
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Curb

They tore out all the damp, swollen wood from the old curb (which was flat BTW) and built a new one out of bricks with an inward slope. Got the permit, did the flood test, got the inspection--none of which was ever done with any prior contractors. They also used tar paper and wire mesh in pre-slope. The one they tore out had neither. All in all, they have done a pretty good job. Just not a lot of attention to little details.

We are still so mad that the people that did this in 2009 did such a poor job. As you well know, everything can look fine on the surface but be a disaster underneath. A shower ought to last more than 9 years! And to think this all started because I decided to re-caulk the bottom of the shower.
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Old 08-15-2018, 03:37 PM   #68
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Caulk advice

I posted this question in the cleaning and sealing category but thought it might be more appropriate here.

We are finally nearing the end of a very stressful shower remodel. They finished putting up the tiles today. Tomorrow is grout day. I just had a discussion with my contractor about caulk. We have Daltile Almond Tile, will be using Custom Building Products Bone grout. He wants to use the Custom Bone Caulk to match the grout color.

So a couple of questions:

1. I believe Custom caulk is a latex based siliconized caulk, not 100% silicone. Aren't you supposed to use 100% silicone in showers?

2. I have 4 tubes of Laticrete Latisil Sealant in Almond (purchased for a different project) and it is 100% silicone. It says Expires 12/2018, so I am assuming it is still good to use???

3. Will 4 tubes be enough to caulk a 4x5 shower?

4. Even though the almond caulk won't be a match to the bone grout, the grout lines are only 1/8 inch. I think it will be a close match to the tile itself. Should it look OK if the grout is bone and the caulk is almond??

5. We have had issues with these guys not really being "detail" oriented. So....do I trust that they can do a neat job with the silicone caulk??? I know it is tricky to get a nice smooth line, and if they are used to using siliconized latex caulk, I am scared they will make a mess of the silicone caulk. Is it reasonable to ask them how much experience they have with silicone and what "technique" they use??? All I need is to have to deal with removing a bad caulk job after spending all this money. It is such a PITA to remove.
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Old 08-15-2018, 04:58 PM   #69
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1. Thatís my preference

2. Should be, assuming itís been properly stored.

3. Should be

4. Thatís your call, based on your tolerance for shade difference

5. Iíd ask them what their method is. Youíre right - itís a PITA to clean up a messy silicone job or remove it and re-do. You want to do everything you can to ensure itís done right the first time.
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:28 PM   #70
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I normally have some Acetone handy when using silicone. You shouldn't have to hold their hand like you're doing.
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Old 08-15-2018, 08:12 PM   #71
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I have come to the conclusion that both of these guys are semi-retired and just do a job now and then. The guy that does most of the labor is in his mid-60s and just doesn't seem to care much anymore about details, so some of his work is a little sloppy. He clearly is not a tile specialist. And I freely admit I am super picky and notice every little thing. I learned a lot from previous re-models and reading forums like this so I catch things most people wouldn't. But the owner (who is here every day to supervise) has been very good about "fixing" issues as they come up. But you are right, I shouldn't have to be questioning them and telling them to fix some of the things I have found.
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:08 PM   #72
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I guess it's not always the case but I'm 61 and probably more picky now than I've ever been. I'm not in a big hurry to do anything and don't really care if I work today or not. But, if I do something, it'll be as good as I can get it. If his work is shoddy, it's probably been that way for a long time. Some guys just don't have an eye for detail.
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Old 08-16-2018, 09:58 PM   #73
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Caulk question

After much discussion, it was clear the people I hired did not want to use nor were they comfortable using 100% silicone so I gave in cause i just want to be done. They used Color Fast Tile and Grout Caulk which apparently is a siliconized acrylic. I believe it is made by Interceramic.

Has anyone used Color Fast caulk and have any opinion on its durability in a shower? Whatís the likely average life span? Is 5 years feasible or is it more like 6 months?

If I do decide to remove it and replace it myself with 100% silicone, either now or down the road, I have heard that both Laticrete Latisil and Colorsil are both good products. Anyone have a preference for either of those brands or have another brand they like?
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Old 08-16-2018, 11:13 PM   #74
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Latex or siliconized latex is mold food.

1- Remove it as fast as possible

2- Read the Silicone caulking tutorial some good lookin' fellow wrote.

3- Admire your work.
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Old 08-17-2018, 07:02 AM   #75
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I've used Latasil as well as many of the GE silicones from Lowe's. They'll all work. The Latasil is great as you can color-match it but it is expensive.
If you do apply silicone yourself, I'd use the type II (neutral cure, i.e. not based on acetic acid). It tends to be a bit easier to work with in my experience as it doesn't skim over so quickly.

I can't believe your builders aren't "comfortable" with silicone. Is this even an option? What you have now, is an inferior product that only exists because it's cheaper and people don't feel "comfortable" with silicone. It has no other advantages. How long will it last? I don't know. It isn't the proper product to begin with. It will shrink and crack always. I've used acrylic latex sealant before, but only in dry places where I sought to fill a small void, e.g. between a window and the sill/trim assembly.
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