Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 01-18-2016, 10:19 PM   #1
Adamculp2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Central IL
Posts: 5
hydronic floor heat help

Need advice on hydronic floor heat. Doing a large two bathroom remodel and will be relocation the hot water heat into the floor. Existing subfloor to stay down and will not be removing the ceiling below. What are the best options to minimize floor assembly height? Would like to use schluter beckotec unless the is are better options with regards to floor hieght. And go. Thanks for the help.
__________________
Adam
Adamculp2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 01-18-2016, 10:40 PM   #2
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 14,484
Other methods that I'm aware of would require a thicker mudbed than Beckotec unless you wish to change to electric.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-26-2016, 05:14 PM   #3
Adamculp2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Central IL
Posts: 5
Hot water floor heat alternatives

Need advice on hydronic floor heat. Doing a large two bathroom remodel and will be relocation the hot water heat into the floor. Existing sub-floor to stay down and will not be removing the ceiling below. What are the best options to minimize floor assembly height? Would like to use schluter beckotec unless the is are better options with regards to floor height. And go. Thanks for the help.
____________
__________________
Adam
Adamculp2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-26-2016, 05:51 PM   #4
cx
Moderator emeritus
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 93,590
Welcome, Adam.

I've combined your new thread with your previous thread on the same project. Please keep all your project questions here.

I know of no way to install your hydronics on top of a wood framed floor with any less gain in height than using Bekotec.

You've evaluated your floor structure to see if you're qualified for a ceramic tile installation without any structural improvement?
__________________
CX

Y'ALL NEW VISITORS READ THIS HERE!
cx is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-27-2016, 06:12 AM   #5
tilemanct
Tile & Stone
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Northeast/Connecticut
Posts: 2,553
Make sure you talk with a heating pro. You cant take regular hot water baseboard and convert it to radiant in floor heat without manifolds, controls and zoning. The design temp of a hot water baseboard is way too high for radiant. Could be costly. Bekotec is 1 1/2" in thickness just for the panels.
It might be cheaper to do electric radiant in those areas.
__________________
Dave

CTEF Certified Installer
I lost my hero on 5-21-16 You will be missed. Semper Fi
tilemanct is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-27-2016, 09:56 PM   #6
PetrH
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chilliwack, B.C.
Posts: 1,405
I'd say your best bet is to rip out the subfloor and install pex runs in the joist spaces below. Plywood is cheap compared to all the other stuff. Normally that's stapled in from below, but I'm sure you can figure out a way that will not involve having a flooring screw go through the lines.
__________________
Petr
PetrH is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-28-2016, 12:07 AM   #7
T_Hulse
Tile Contractor
 
T_Hulse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 4,332
Hi Adam, with Bekotec, your minimum thickness with a 3/8" tile will be around 2 3/8" finished total.
Using TCNA method RH123, with self leveling underlayment, you can cut that down to about 1 11/16". (both methods would be above your highest point on the floor)
__________________
Tom Hulse
Visit my web site here
T_Hulse is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-01-2016, 07:28 PM   #8
Adamculp2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Central IL
Posts: 5
Thanks for all the help. I will look at the self leveling method and taking up the sub-floor. I am working with a heating contractor as well. This room will have a new zone installed from the manifold. There is no additional structural improvements need for the addition.
__________________
Adam
Adamculp2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gypcrete over hydronic heat JR Tile Forum/Advice Board 8 12-04-2010 08:14 AM
float over hydronic heat pooky Professionals' Hangout 7 03-27-2009 01:57 PM
Hydronic heat over basement slab InOver Tile Forum/Advice Board 5 05-22-2008 06:56 PM
does felt smell under hydronic radiant heat floor? jane voichick Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 08-07-2006 06:10 PM
hydronic heat John Farnan Tile Forum/Advice Board 2 11-01-2005 06:18 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:14 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC