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Unread 11-23-2010, 07:37 AM   #1
scott-wisc
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Scott's Main Bathroom Remodel

I have a 30 year old Kohler tub with an opening of 52 3/4". Lowe's has Sterling frameless sliding glass door for around $380, but not for an opening that wide. They can order a Basco for $470. I like the price, but they don't have any diplays from that company. The website looks cool. Anyone have any experiance with Basco? Model: 3400 Classic Semi Frameless.
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Unread 11-23-2010, 09:34 PM   #2
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Hi Scott, I have put in a few Bascos, there are nice doors.
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Unread 12-14-2010, 10:11 AM   #3
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toilet rough in loc.

I am just beginning my bath remodel. In the original layout, the finished drywall was 3/4" from the tank lid. I am removing the drywall, putting up cbu and tiling the wall. I would like to bring the wall out a 1/2 to make up for out of sqaureness. What is the standard distance from the wall to the center of the rough-in? (I am getting a new toilet)
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Unread 12-14-2010, 10:26 AM   #4
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What toilet are you getting? Check the specs and they will give you a distance. Standard is 12" though lots of toilets will go to 10" as well.
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Unread 12-14-2010, 10:34 AM   #5
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Scott, it'll be helpful if you'll keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered. We can give it a more generic title any time you'd like.
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Unread 12-14-2010, 10:35 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott
I am removing the drywall, putting up cbu and tiling the wall.
Why not just tile over the drywall? Or if you are removing the drywall to get a more plumb surface why not install drywall shims and put drywall back up? The wall behind a toilet does not qualify as a "wet" location. Drywall is a whole lot easier to install and keep plumb IMO.

I tiled the wall behind my vanity (with travertine) on regular old drywall.
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Unread 12-14-2010, 10:37 AM   #7
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I started a new thread, Maybe cause I used the same attachment?
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Unread 12-14-2010, 11:04 AM   #8
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If you'd like I can change the title of the thread to something more apropos for the overall project.
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Unread 12-14-2010, 02:19 PM   #9
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Brian- I am moving some wiring and making the corner sqaure. That's why the drywall is coming down. Can I just replace the sheetrock? should it be taped? I am tiling floor to ceiling on the wall behind the toilet.

Another thing, the flange on the tub is a 1/2" from the studs. It was shimmed with asphalt shingle strips and rocked right up to the tub. Can I hang the new sheetrock to the edge of the flange and over lap the tile to avoid the wall curving out that last 16"?
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Unread 12-14-2010, 02:38 PM   #10
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Sheetrock is fine in the dry areas of your bathroom.

You can overlap the tile over the flange as you proposed, provided that at least 2/3s of the tile will be on sheetrock. Backbutter the tile, because the thinset won't stick well to the fiberglass. The excess will smoosh out, and that's fine. What stays behind will support the tile OK. The edge of the tile will be caulked, and that sticks well to both stone and fiberglass.

For squaring up the walls, nothing beats using sisters. This allows you to bring them out as much as you need, and to correct plumb issues, out-of planness, and what not.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 06:38 AM   #11
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I have all the drywall removed from the walls where there will be tile. Any reason why I could'nt use 5/16 cbu instead of replacing the 1/2" drywall?

By going this route, I would gain a little more clearance behind the toilet. It would also work better where the tile meets the tub, giving me a little more reveal of the tub, otherwise the tub and tile would be nearly flush.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 07:17 AM   #12
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Quote:
posted by Scott:
I have all the drywall removed from the walls where there will be tile. Any reason why I could'nt use 5/16 cbu instead of replacing the 1/2" drywall?
Don't you have any areas where the 5/16" cbu will have to mate up with 1/2" drywall? If so how would you make that transition?
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Unread 12-16-2010, 07:46 AM   #13
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Hey Bob, I'm not sure what you mean when you say sisters. What I'm picturing is a 2x4 attached to a stud to bring the wall out as opposed to using shims. In my case, the wall that needs to be squared is 5' long with a doorway on the side that would need to be brought out. That becomes a problem with the door jam. We are painting the doors and trim. So could I just ad an extention to the jam? Would this interfere with the hinges?

The reason this corner needs to be sqaure is to fit a granite counter top.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 07:52 AM   #14
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That depends Scott, which way does the door swing? Can you add that to you diagram?
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Unread 12-16-2010, 10:32 AM   #15
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I'm a bit confused, At one point we were talking about shimming/sistering the wall behind the toilet to deal with mismatched substrates, now it appears you are concerned with squaring the doorway wall to the toilet wall while at the same time setting the toilet wall further back to create a reveal where it meets the shower flange.

I'd think the reveal will add complications and might not really look like an aesthetically designed reveal but maybe more like a fix.

If you are trying to move the wall back because of a toilet setback, you can look at the specs, but most toilets have wiggle room on that I think a toto has over 3/4 inch meaning a 12" spec'd setback could be as little as 11 1/4. or you could find a 10" setback but they're usually more money.

Looking at your door pic adding a jamb extension will interfere with hinge swing. You could use a setback reveal as it appears the door only opens maybe 95 to 100 degrees. A standard setback of 1/4 inch would probably be more than sufficient.
Another option is simply a templated countertop done all the time to take into account your out of square issue. If you want to save money though using a standard top that's not an option obviously.

But, to me, the reason I was mentioning being confused and wanting to understand what you are trying to do is it would seem that we don't really understand the overall squareness of the room, the wall that is causing the real issue and what is really the best solution. What I mean is are you exacerbating the problem by moving the toilet wall in or out near the flange? Instead of squaring two walls to each other, what is actually square to the doorway wall and where would a wall squared to that actually end up relative to the shower flange? How are the opposing walls square to each other. Ideally your first steps in this process is to square the entire room as it originally should have been, rather than just squarring a corner without relevance to anything else. While it might not be feasible to get perfectly square given the existing placement of the shower, I'd at least want to be working in that direction rather than moving one wall an then squarring the next to that, kind of chasing my tail and it only get's worse somewhere.
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