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Old 01-06-2018, 02:31 PM   #16
wwhitney
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Shaving down the ends a 1/4" or an 1/8" to fit under the walls would be fine. Just do it as a gradual transition, not a notch.

However, in the joist bays with obstructions like that vent or the can lights, I don't think you'll actually be able to fit in a longer joist than the length of subfloor you have open. And there's no real need to get bearing at the ends of the sister, the existing joists should have adequate bearing. All you are trying to do is stiffen the joist.

If the joist bay is unobstructed, you probably could fit in a longer joist by putting it flat with one end raised, sliding the other end under the wall until the whole joist fits in the bay, sliding it back to center it, and then rolling it upright. But I don't think it is worth the effort.

Do go to a real lumber yard and get Select Struct 2x8s. If you want to economize, you could use 12 footers, then you don't have to cut them and have no waste.

Cheers, Wayne
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:33 AM   #17
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Ben, you aren't going to find joists that have an actual measurement of 7". I have some nominal KD 2X8's laying in my garage and their actual measurements are 1 1/2" X 7 1/8".

Having attempted doing so myself (but using 2X10's) I believe you will find it a challenge rolling 7" joists into place under the existing walls because they will measure more than 7" from one edge to the opposing edge. You'd have to bevel those edges. Or wail on them with a hammer, which will hurt the edge. BTDT.

Use "standard" and very straight 2X8's, or engineered lumber (which is delightfully straight) and rip them down to, say, 6 7/8". Hold them short of going under the existing walls - you really aren't gaining anything by having their ends on the load bearing walls. Having them a wee bit under sized of the existing 7" joists will allow a little wiggle room for adjustment. The 1/8" won't matter.
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Old 01-07-2018, 03:32 PM   #18
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Thanks guys,
I talked to a friend who used to do house framing and he said he'd heard of private lumber mills selling 7" lumber. But all the lumber mills I called treated me like I was insane. None of it is stamped but it's all incredibly straight grain and very few knots. Looks better grade than the select structural but I'm not an expert.

The plan was to do exactly what you were saying and slide one end under the wall flat and drop the other end in then hammer it upright with rounded corners. The vent is being removed and the can lights can all be dropped out of the ceiling below. But I needed 13ft and every yard I called only had 12 and 16 which was double the cost just to waste 3ft of it.

So I meticulously picked through the 12ft pile at the yard my framing friend recommended and found the 8 straightest pieces stamped with Select. A friend with a table saw helped me rip them to 6 7/8 but then we started drinking and nothing else got done yesterday. Today's task is to pull out plumbing and electrical and set them in without dropping them through the drywall.

I was going to use liquid nails adhesive and 3" screws. Any tips?
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Old 01-07-2018, 04:25 PM   #19
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Throw away the liquid nails and buy PL Premium.
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:24 PM   #20
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Thanks all,
I picked up some PL premium and got it done with 2.5" construction screws ever 8", staggered each set 1/2"

I did end up modifying my original layout to what's attached so I had 7 joists to sister. I put one end on the bearing wall below on the bathroom side and the other end is about 12" from the bearing.

I managed to pick all very straight lumber and crowned it all before ripping but had one piece with a little more crown and it's about 1/16th to 1/8th proud in the center of the span (despite my best efforts to stand on it while clamping).

What's the best way to level the crown? I don't think I'll have any continued use for a power planer but I could pick up a very cheap one and do that? I have a 4ft level and plan to check the rest after I finish scraping off the old adhesive.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:07 PM   #21
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Well, you could use a hand plane. Sounds like you don't have very much to remove, so it's wouldn't be too much work. A block plane is always a good thing to have around.

Cheers, Wayne
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:16 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Ben
2.5" construction screws every 8", staggered each set 1/2"
I'm not sure I understand your description, you should use two rows, one at the top and one at the bottom, each maybe 1.5" from the edge. Also, the 1" penetration into the main member of a 2.5" screw may not allow the screw to develop its full dowel bearing strength, the usual standard is a penetration of 10 diameters of the fasteners. I think a common spec is 10d common nails (3" x 0.148") at 12" o.c. in each row, top and bottom.

Of course, if the PL Premium creates a good enough bond, then the screws are really just to clamp the members together while the PL Premium cures. But glue is hard to calculate, so common practice is to use the nails as the calculable connection and use the glue for improved performance.

Cheers, Wayne
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:52 PM   #23
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Understood.

The pattern is 3 screws every 8 inches and every other set is offset 1/2" up/down

I did have C-clamps on tight when screwing them together but there are a few areas with less squeeze-out than other smaller projects I've done. It seemed like the PL Premium was a little less oozy than the liquid nails or started to set faster but that could just be me.

From what I read, the standard is usually 3 10d nails for a 2x8 at 16" spacing and I couldn't find anything very substantial on screw patterns other than some people prefer screws with glue for this.

It feels significantly stiffer now even before bracing or subfloor but it wasn't incredibly bouncy to begin with. I guess I could still add some 3" Timberlok screws every couple feet.
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Old 01-13-2018, 08:29 PM   #24
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I ended up buying a cheap power planer today and got the proud joist level and flush with the old one.

How level do the joists need to be? They all seem almost perfect along the length with a 4ft level but if I span 4 joists with it in some areas the straight edge will rock slightly on a higher joist. Maybe 1/16th. Is this close enough or should I spend a lot of time trying to plane them to be perfect?
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:16 AM   #25
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If you haven't done so already I'd plane or sand them down now Ben. But I'd really suggest a straight edge long enough to go across all of them at once.
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