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Unread 02-26-2008, 01:22 PM   #1
tsquare
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barrier free shower

hello all, i need some help. i have been approached by a client to remove his one piece acrylic shower and do a curbless tile shower in its place. the house has a slab on grade. i was planning on doing the following let me know what you think:
remove stall
cut existing slab with skil saw and diamond blade by running saw fence along plates on three walls and maybe 12" in front of where acrylic tub ended.
get concrete and some soil out of the way.
move shower drain to center.
pour new slab lower that (e) slab (not sure how much lower 1-1/2" perhaps and not sure if i need plastic under this new slab)
set drain
float mortar bed to drain
apply kerdi sheet material over mortar bed and drying area of bathroom.

essentially the above mentioned keeps me from having to float a mortarbed on the entire bathroom floor and then haveing to deal with elevation difference at bathroom door. how does this sound to you all?
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Unread 02-26-2008, 06:12 PM   #2
John Bridge
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Hi, Please give us a name. You sound like a pro, and I'll move us into the pro area.

I wouldn't cut into the slab. That more or less destroys the continuity of the whole deal.
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Unread 02-26-2008, 06:48 PM   #3
tsquare
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hello john, my name is carlos. i will update my profile. out of necessity i have become a jack of all trades and a master of none. thanks to peple like you that take the time and interest to entertain our questions, people like me can advance in our knowledge and craft.

by the way, it is an honor to get a response from you.... i am a big fan!
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Unread 02-26-2008, 06:57 PM   #4
johntrent
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John - can you explain the reasoning for not cutting into the slab a little further? Would you instead - run the floor at an incline from the entry door to the point of the curbless shower then break it to pitch into the shower? or do you have another trick you can share with us?
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Unread 02-26-2008, 07:23 PM   #5
tsquare
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i to am concerned with cutting the slab. i thought that if i did this i would have to provide some sort of shovel footing underneath the new slab i pour so as the provide some stability. second i am not sure if i have to provide plastic under the new slab to act as a vapor moisture barrier or will the kerdi sheet material placed onto of it all be enough to provide the vapor moisture barrier for the new tile installation.
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Unread 02-26-2008, 07:55 PM   #6
Bill Vincent
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This might add another dimension to the discussion:

http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=41677

We're talking about the possibility, being that the shower area would be so small, of turning the entire bathroom into a wet room, thereby still being able to keep it curbless.
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Unread 02-26-2008, 08:04 PM   #7
John Bridge
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Here's what I've come up with for handicappers. Something similar is possible with a glass enclosure. You do need to bust out around the drain area to get the Kerdi drain down just about to slab level. Bond the mortar, and the hump doesn't need to be any more than half to three-quarters of an inch. An inch with tile. http://www.johnbridge.com/accessible_showers.htm
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Unread 02-26-2008, 11:10 PM   #8
tsquare
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john, i took a look at the pics. the one with the hump is the one im most interested in for this application. under the hump scenario it appears that the bathroom floor remains at the same elevation (flat) the hump is what contains the water. what happens inside the shower area is the floor in that area flat also? what do you mean by bonding the mortar?
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Unread 02-27-2008, 07:02 AM   #9
John Bridge
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Hi Carlos,

The height of the hump is just a hair higher than the perimeter of the shower floor. The slope goes from there to the flange of the Kerdi drain. The drain is set at slab (finish floor) height. The bathroom floor outside the shower is untouched.

The smooth hump is for people with physical problems, and a shower curtain is usually used because it is the least restrictive method of keep the bulk of the water in the shower. It hangs on the shower side of the hump summit, so you need a little extra depth in the shower.

You could eliminate the hump (or half of it) and just have a step-up of an inch or less and then install a glass enclosure. Either way, everything is done on top of the slab except for the positioning of the drain, which as I said, has to be set so the flange is just about level with the slab.

You bond the deck mud to the slab with thin set. That's how you are able to screed it off so thin -- down to just about nothing at the drain.

Here's a shot of another one I've done.
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Unread 02-27-2008, 11:55 AM   #10
tsquare
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John, thanks so much for the pictures and advise. when installing the kerdi membrane to, as you say, "good ol sheetrock", do you use adhesive or thinset for this. and could you be specific about type, not necessarily brand, because i have been reading that type matters. Also, i dont think so but i better ask, do you tape the sheetrock joints prior to installing the kerdi membrane? thanks again.
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