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Unread 08-01-2020, 07:36 PM   #46
gcc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
Basically, yes. You'd probably want to use a long-sweep 90.

NOte, that on the trap itself, you can swing the trap through probably close to 270-degrees...IOW, it can partially fold back on itself, and still function fine. That should give you a bit more flexibility in getting it where you want.

You DO want to ensure that when you're done, the riser from the trap is as close to perfectly plumb as you can, as with the large diameter drain, any little error will tip it. Keep in mind that to get things exactly where you want, you CANNOT dry fit the pieces. YOu have to carefully measure, since the pipe will not bottom out in the tapered fittings until you use the cement which literally melts the plastic, so they can fit together tight. My experience with Kerdi drains is that they do not have the normal amount of taper, and you may be able to dry fit that on.

Thanks! Is it easier to attach the riser to the trap longer than it needs to be and then cut it down or attach the riser to the drain first and then attach that assembly to the trap? I’m sure either would work but I’m just wondering which way is easier / least likely to screw up

Also - I cringe asking this - don’t want to start any arguments but... lost a little sleep thinking about it. How common is it for those of you doing this a lot to use shark bites in a wall? Makes me a bit nervous but I’m hearing more and more that people are doing it. There is no access from the back of the wall, so that makes it even scarier. Is this something that shouldn’t be done? Is sweating a pex conversion fitting better and then running pex with crimp rings a safer option? It’s more expensive- as I’d have to buy the crimp tool to make just 4 connections, but...is it the better thing to do?


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Unread 08-01-2020, 10:29 PM   #47
jadnashua
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There's a lot of controversy over the use of SHarkbites. I've used them when it is easier, or let that actually be a LOT easier. I don't have an issue with soldering, and prefer it most of the time. But, Sharkbites are approved for hidden connections.

Note that the ID of pex and then throw in the fittings, and you're volume, and potentially pressure can be down over the use of copper. The ID of pex with a few fittings inserted is closer to 3/8" copper. Okay for a single shower head, but don't try it for more, IMHO.

Some shower valves have mounting screws or tabs, but some need you to anchor them via the pipe connections, and that doesn't work well with pex.

The other thing with pex and sharkbites, well, that's true with either compression or crimp connections, is that they can rotate, unlike a copper solder connection.

You don't want any stress on the connection when using a Sharkbite, so straight in, straight out and use clamps, if needed.
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Unread Yesterday, 05:41 AM   #48
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One important thing I read and it makes sense. When using sharkbites always use a real copper pipe cutter, and never use a hacksaw to cut the pipes. You want a clean round pipe when done. The hacksaw can flatten part of the curve of the pipe.
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Unread Yesterday, 08:33 AM   #49
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I’ve read they are approved - it just worries me because there are a lot of mixed opinions. I’d we fo that way I’ll make sure we follow installation procedures - including NOT sanding the pipe, which I know you need to do for solder but not for sharbite.

Just for my own knowledge - is a threaded connection better than a push on or compression connection? I assume solder is probably the least likely to form a leak, but what about threaded and compression fittings? Lots of options and I am not sure what is best. I could solder on threaded connection and then run the ready in cpvc, which I have much more experience with. Dunno - decisions!!

Also - the concrete grinder attachment for my angle grinder worked great, but I can’t get it off the angle grinder. The spanner wrench that came with the grinder reach the holes cause the wheel is too thick. I had the same problem getting the wheel on but somehow it managed to lock in. Is there a way to get the wheel off without using the little spanner wrench?

Thanks!


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Unread Yesterday, 09:05 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg
...is a threaded connection better than a push on or compression connection?
I would say yes.

Let me also say, though, that I just recently visited the only Shark Bite connection I have ever made to a copper pipe as a test in a customer's greenhouse where it is completely exposed and it doesn't really matter if it started to leak. Been in place maybe 5 years or more. I had to make a modification requiring soldering in a tee within about 8 inches of the Shark Bite. I moved the pipe in the fitting a good deal and was sure I would need to replace it. I didn't. It doesn't leak after being moved more than I think would be reasonable. I still would not use one in a hidden location, but I'm convinced they can work.

I can't recall the last time I used the "proper" spanner to remove or install an angle grinder wheel of any kind, Greg. Put on a heavy work glove, press the spindle lock and just turn the thing like a jar lid.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread Yesterday, 12:01 PM   #51
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I can't recall the last time I used the "proper" spanner to remove or install an angle grinder wheel of any kind, Greg. Put on a heavy work glove, press the spindle lock and just turn the thing like a jar lid.
Might have to hit the gym a few times first...

In genereal, if I solder a connection and it doesn't leak when the water comes back on, is it safe to say it is a good connection or do I have to watch it for a while to ensure that it really is a good connection, like I would feel I had to if it were a sharkbite.

Thanks!
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Unread Yesterday, 12:24 PM   #52
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If it doesn't leak when you turn the water back on it's probably good. If it still isn't leaking after you've admired your work for 10 minutes, it's probably better.
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Unread Yesterday, 05:09 PM   #53
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Lol!! I’ve only really worked with cpvc. I WANT to solder and have the torch, I’ve just never done it. So the debate in my head is ...Will my soldering be more reliable than a sharkbite? The other debate is - I don’t have any pex tools but pex would be a good way to run these line using 90 degree bends and lessening the number of connectors needed.

So my options are:

1. Use sharkbites with pex. It would be about $50 in fittings plus the pipe

2. Solder on pex sweat connectors to the supply lines and run pex the rest of the way using threaded or solder connections at the valve but have to buy a crimp tool and rings and fittings and pipe.

3. Solder on threaded connections to the copper and convert to cpvc and run those lines to the valve.

The reason I asked the question before was that I wanted to know IF I soldered and pressure tested and saw no leaks, could I be relatively sure it was a good connection. Keep in mind, the wall will be open for a little while once the system is pressurized. Just not sure...


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