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Unread 11-04-2013, 01:25 PM   #1
Captain_Matt
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Matt and Crystal's Master Shower Thread

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen!

My wife and I are tackling a bathroom renovation thanks to the courage bestowed upon us by reading this site. We're taking out an existing bath/shower fiberglass combo and replacing it with a kerdi shower with two shower heads. The job is a permitted one, so all of this will be inspected. While we're competent DIY'ers this is our biggest project to date, so my apologies in advance if I mess up some terminology.

Our joist deflection passes muster with the Deflecto, and the entire bathroom has 3/4" T&G Plywood down and from what I can tell so far the floor is really flat. This is a second floor renovation with a finished living room and half bath directly beneath.

We went past the point of no return over the weekend and demo'd the bathroom (the reciprocating saw is the best $70 I ever spent with that regard). All in all, we were pleasantly surprised with few problems with the exception that the supply pipes can't be routed through the exiting wall because it sits directly on top of a joist and that every 2X4 that isn't facing a wall was just slapped up there.

Here's the bathroom so far:
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But, I've got questions for the next stage of moving the drain plumbing.

1.The existing tub had a 1.5" drain from a 2" to 1.5" reducer on a 45 degree fitting. I now understand from the all powerful google that I can't just remove the old 45. What are my options here to get pointed towards the center of the future shower? Do I have to remove the fitting and use couplings on all of the other connections? I don't have great clearance under there and it sits directly beneath the half bath where I'd rather not rip open the ceiling.

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2. The existing coupling is pretty close to a joist, I've read that I'm ok to drill through the joist as long as I'm not in the top 2" or bottom 2" of the joist. Since I can't have any 90 degrees in the waste pipe is it ok to drill that at an angle? If so, any advice on how to do so?

Thanks in advance for looking at this, we're incredibly thankful to have stumbled upon this site a few months ago.
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Unread 11-04-2013, 02:20 PM   #2
Carbidetooth
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1. Yes on removing the fitting and using couplers. Retrofits aren't always pretty, but you can get good and functional. You need to get 2" to shower drain.

2. Holesaw or and Self-feed bit...access may be a problem, and there's that duct, too. What about a line drain at end where tub drain was? Perfect candidate, but spendy.

I think you could angle supply lines up into that wall with pex, even with the joist. Pics would tell us more.
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Unread 11-04-2013, 04:28 PM   #3
Captain_Matt
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Thanks for the reply, much appreciated. That's what I figured on the fitting; although now I need to figure out the best way of cutting that thing out.

I'll take some closer pictures tonight on the supply lines. Are you allowed to cut notches on the bottom plates of the wall? There may be just enough room to shove some PEX or even the existing 1/2" copper lines in there before it hits the joist, thanks for the suggestion.

The only thing that concerns me about the linear drain is that since this is a tub replacement, the opening is 60". There would be 1.25" difference between the front and the back of the shower with a linear drain. Now, I'm not entirely sure that would even be noticeable over that span, but it's why the original plan was for a center drain. But, that was before we opened the floor and found the Easter Egg of the vent as well...
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Unread 11-04-2013, 05:51 PM   #4
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You can cut notches in plates, you'll wanna put nail plates over them. I think I'd bore 3/4 or 7/8" hole angled down into joist bay from stud bay, you might skim side of joist, but unless you're hacking off huge chunks, it shouldn't be a problem.

I wouldn't' be too concerned with the slope, it hides behind the curb and the grade isn't any different than center drain.
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Unread 01-13-2014, 01:21 PM   #5
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Well, this project is slowly rolling along!

As an update, Mrs. Crystal didn't want a linear drain at the front, so we opted to go through the joist bay and set the P-trap as close to centered as we could get it with the duct being in the way.

We decided to extend the existing wall out an additional 1.5" in order to accommodate the supply lines that can't run through the wall due to the joist placement.

I was surprised at how long it took to get all of the behind the walls stuff finished. We had to wind up sistering or adding to the existing studs in the wall and we had to route the supply lines for the handshower through the attic. I added insulation only on the cold side of that supply line and will have to use the fact that the line won't be under a sustained pressure that would allow for some ice expansion. (Other than the polar vortex it doesn't get below freezing too terribly often in TN) We also replaced the old valve and added a transfer valve, all with Moen. For someone who had never soldered before, the best advice I can give to fellow newbies is to use the Oatey No. 95 Tinning flux. I switched early on in the project from the non tinning stuff to that based upon forum advice and the two pinhole leaks I had to redo were on places that I wasn't using the tinning flux.

I added a recessed light tied into the existing vanity light/switch and put 1/2" Hardibacker up over all of the walls and ceiling. Working with that stuff sucked. While it wasn't a big deal to "score and snap" (or "score score score score score score score score and snap) pieces that had at least 12" or more to remove from the board, removing anything that was only a few inches was a real chore. I got best results by scoring it a gazillion times, flipping it over and then placing scraps of the hardi backer along the scoring line and hitting it up and down the fault line with a hammer. There was a lot of profanity involved though!

I put up the Kerdi this weekend and that all went up surprisingly easy relative to the construction phase. I did have a few feet of Kerdi-Band that did not wind up getting the minimum 2" overlap though, leading to a few questions regarding Kerdi-Fix:

1. It's my understanding that I can put Kerdi-Fix down the seam of the Kerdi-Band and that should create the waterproof seal as opposed to running another piece of Kerdi-Band along the seam. Is that correct?

2. What's the best way to use Kerdi-Fix? I was planning on putting some on a putty knife and running it down the seam. Is there a better way?

3. There's a little bit of the Kerdi-Band that has thinset covering the seam. It's not a significant buildup, but it does obscure the seam. Do I need to remove that thinset buildup before applying the Kerdi-Fix?

Thanks all again! It's exciting to finally be at this stage after a couple of months of toiling away!
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Unread 04-26-2014, 09:18 AM   #6
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So I'm working on tiling the shower floor and the tile the Mrs picked out is a sheet of 72 1/2"x2" porcelain tiles on a mesh.

Taking these tiles out of their packaging and they seem to have two layers of mesh on them. Name:  ImageUploadedByTapatalk1398525371.851606.jpg
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Do I need to take these off the double layer of mesh backing and lay them individually? This, again is going on a shower floor and I'm concerned that the backing will prevent proper coverage.

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!
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