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Unread 03-01-2004, 11:46 PM   #1
jerdillo
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Saltillo Tile Restoration

Purchased home with Saltillo Tile throughout, we hate the way it looks, especially in the kitchen where grease stains are prevelant. I believe it will be too costly to remove tile, so I decided to live with it. How do I clean it and give it a nice shiny finish ? And is there a way to die this type of tile. HELP !!
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Unread 03-02-2004, 01:42 AM   #2
TRS Ry-Dog
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Jerdillo,

Satillo is generally restored by stripping and resealing. A friends company does this type of work and the amount of sealer they use on a single satillo floor amazes me, something like 8 coats with 3 different products, but the finished product is amazing and bulletproof. I don't know the names of the sealers they use off hand, but personally I wouldn't tackle this task, I like my lungs and gladly pay for someone else to breath in the stripper and sealant fumes.

And your right about removal, personally I love demoing out anything, as I get to breakout the big guns and make some noise.

Good luck,

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Unread 03-02-2004, 07:30 AM   #3
doitright
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Hi Jerdillo, Welcome

Moving your post to the Tile & Stone Cleaning/Restoration forum, where it can be best addressed.

If you're up to it, please share a 1st name, and what part of the country are you in?
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Unread 03-02-2004, 08:00 AM   #4
John Bridge
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Aquamix makes a suite of products that will re-do Saltillo. Finishing is not hard. The products are all water base. I think the stripping and clean-up should be done by a pro.

http://www.aquamix.com
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Unread 03-02-2004, 09:45 AM   #5
kemguru
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Hi Jerdillo

Yep, finishing is easy. Anyone with a fine push broom can do a fine job of it. Stripping is, well, lets just say much more in-depth.

I doubt you’re fortunate enough to know what kind of sealers were used, or if the tiles were of the kind that came pre-sealed from the factory.

If a standard finish was used, ammonia Might take it. Using a green pad, scrub a little area with a mixture of 1-part ammonia to 10-parts water. Let the ammonia/water solution dwell for 20 minutes, or so, before you start scrubbing. Dip the scrub pad into the clean solution, and then start scrubbing. Wet-vac the mess. Repeat, if needed. You’ll know when the seal is gone when the tile gets dark, quickly, when wet.

If this process works, but doesn’t quite get it, you can try TYW Heavy Duty Cleaner & Stripper. This is your last stop for water-based, user-friendly, heavy-duty products. The next step is a solvent-based stripper.

If a urethane was used, or the tiles came pre-sealed (same thing), a solvent-based stripper is in order. Specifically, Methylene Chloride. Sunnyside Glue & Adhesive Remover is about as good as it gets, as far as a DIY accessible product goes. You can usually find it at True Value Hardware.

Apply a thick coat to a small area (say 4 tiles, or so, until you get the hang of it)
Let dwell for at least 10 minutes, but no more than 20 minutes
Splash some water on it
Start scrubbing with a stiff nylon brush
Pull the mess to the side, out of your way
Splash some more water on it
Scrub with a green pad (I prefer 3M #86 or #96, because I’ve not had the green color bleed from these pads before…well not much at least…they’re the best)
Wet-vac
Let dry completely
Repeat (maybe…we’re looking for the tile to darken, immediately, when wet with water. If it doesn’t get dark right away, repeat the stripping process)

Once the seal is gone, you’ll Lacquer wash the floor. This will cleanup the residue left from the stripper and help further remove any stains. The stripper will, at best, remove the oil stains. Worst case, the stripper will lighten them a little. The Lacquer Thinner will help, more. Dip a green scrub pad into some Lacquer Thinner and start scrubbing. Open all windows and place fans so you get a strong, constant air flow. Turn off any pilot lights!!

You can concentrate on any remaining stains. More stripper, or you can poultice them. If they’re stubborn, or you are just sick and tired of it all, you can “oil” your floor. A 50/50 mix of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Spirits will darken the tile, blending in old oil stains. It creates a dark, rich look. If you go this route, come on back when the time comes, I’ll walk you through it.

The Aqua Mix Saltillo products are decent, but if you go through all this, I would like to see you use a system similar to what Ryan mentioned. Single component “seal and finish” products are not as good as a built-up system. Again, when the time comes, I’ll steer you right.
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Unread 03-03-2004, 05:41 PM   #6
KChurch1
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To deal with the grease stains, you might need to poultice... You can get a jar of Aqua Mix poultice powder at HD and mix it with some ammonia... enough to make a paste.. cover the stain with about a 1/4" of the paste and cover with plastic wrap, tape down the edges... leave it for 72 hours, uncover it... let it finish drying and then remove the poultice... if the stain is still there... repeat as needed....
Apply the poultice after you have cleaned and stripped the floor... the cleaning/stripping process may remove any stains you have without using the poultice
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Unread 02-17-2006, 11:18 AM   #7
michellecameron
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hi i need help finishing my saltillo floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by kemguru
Hi Jerdillo

Yep, finishing is easy. Anyone with a fine push broom can do a fine job of it. Stripping is, well, lets just say much more in-depth.

I doubt you’re fortunate enough to know what kind of sealers were used, or if the tiles were of the kind that came pre-sealed from the factory.

If a standard finish was used, ammonia Might take it. Using a green pad, scrub a little area with a mixture of 1-part ammonia to 10-parts water. Let the ammonia/water solution dwell for 20 minutes, or so, before you start scrubbing. Dip the scrub pad into the clean solution, and then start scrubbing. Wet-vac the mess. Repeat, if needed. You’ll know when the seal is gone when the tile gets dark, quickly, when wet.

If this process works, but doesn’t quite get it, you can try TYW Heavy Duty Cleaner & Stripper. This is your last stop for water-based, user-friendly, heavy-duty products. The next step is a solvent-based stripper.

If a urethane was used, or the tiles came pre-sealed (same thing), a solvent-based stripper is in order. Specifically, Methylene Chloride. Sunnyside Glue & Adhesive Remover is about as good as it gets, as far as a DIY accessible product goes. You can usually find it at True Value Hardware.

Apply a thick coat to a small area (say 4 tiles, or so, until you get the hang of it)
Let dwell for at least 10 minutes, but no more than 20 minutes
Splash some water on it
Start scrubbing with a stiff nylon brush
Pull the mess to the side, out of your way
Splash some more water on it
Scrub with a green pad (I prefer 3M #86 or #96, because I’ve not had the green color bleed from these pads before…well not much at least…they’re the best)
Wet-vac
Let dry completely
Repeat (maybe…we’re looking for the tile to darken, immediately, when wet with water. If it doesn’t get dark right away, repeat the stripping process)

Once the seal is gone, you’ll Lacquer wash the floor. This will cleanup the residue left from the stripper and help further remove any stains. The stripper will, at best, remove the oil stains. Worst case, the stripper will lighten them a little. The Lacquer Thinner will help, more. Dip a green scrub pad into some Lacquer Thinner and start scrubbing. Open all windows and place fans so you get a strong, constant air flow. Turn off any pilot lights!!

You can concentrate on any remaining stains. More stripper, or you can poultice them. If they’re stubborn, or you are just sick and tired of it all, you can “oil” your floor. A 50/50 mix of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Spirits will darken the tile, blending in old oil stains. It creates a dark, rich look. If you go this route, come on back when the time comes, I’ll walk you through it.

The Aqua Mix Saltillo products are decent, but if you go through all this, I would like to see you use a system similar to what Ryan mentioned. Single component “seal and finish” products are not as good as a built-up system. Again, when the time comes, I’ll steer you right.
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Unread 02-17-2006, 02:24 PM   #8
teeitup
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Michelle:
You can call me at 949 8585211 and I will be happy to give you some advice. We have specialized in sealing Mexican Pavers for 25 years. You may be able to gain some insight by going to my website: http://www.tilesealing.com

Mike
Seal Systems
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Unread 02-18-2006, 01:47 PM   #9
JDA10
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Is there an easy way to tell if your floor is sealed with a polyurethane or water based sealer?

Marty
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Unread 02-18-2006, 11:37 PM   #10
JDA10
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OK, I bought a $2 bottle of ammonia, diluted to 10-1 and spread on one tile. I guess that is the easy way to figure out what you have. It pretty much didn't do anything. On to the glue remover.

Marty
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Unread 02-19-2006, 10:40 AM   #11
doitright
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Hi Marty

Did the ammonia dull the surface at all? Did you abrade the surface at all with the scotch brite pad? Did you allow the ammonia/water solution to dwell on the surface?

You want to use the chemical stripper as a last resort.
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Unread 02-19-2006, 02:03 PM   #12
JDA10
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The surface is already pretty beaten up. It's an outdoor job and they haven't been stripped or sealed in a long time. I just tried again with a stronger concentration and it really didn't do anything at all. I made sure to try to scratch the surface some with the green pad and also let it sit for 15-20 minutes re-applying part way through (it was evaporating). It didn't even change the color at all. The stripper that I bought was JASCO professional Grade Sealer and adhesive Remover. It claims to be harmless to wood concrete metal grout ceramic tile and glass. Is this what I need to use since the ammonia didn't work. I couldn't find the sunnyside glue and adhesive remover, so I bought what seemed like the closest substitute.

Marty
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Unread 02-19-2006, 02:16 PM   #13
doitright
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Hi Marty

Didn't know it was a exterior installation. More than likely a solvent based coating was used. The Jasco should work. Just make sure it contains methylene chloride.
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Unread 02-19-2006, 02:35 PM   #14
JDA10
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Yep, first ingredient, Do you know how much of this stuff it takes? It costs 25 bucks a gallon. Is there something else cheaper that will work just as well?
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Unread 02-19-2006, 02:43 PM   #15
doitright
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Hi Marty

No, that's some good product. I normally use Prosoco's Fast Acting Stripper. Cost's me almost $38 a gallon. Now quit your complaining and get back to work!
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