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Unread 07-12-2015, 05:59 PM   #1
SaintlySins
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Tumbled Travertine Needs GOOD sealer ... please advise

Hi guys and gals,

1000 sq-ft of Lightly Tumbled/Antiqued Travertine on floor with a Bisque sanded grout ... and so far, it looks SPECTACULAR!

I want to seal it so there is NO shine, NO gloss, and NO grout discoloration --- which means keeping the light colored, "dry" look it has now. Since the homeowner has taken pictures of the half that's been installed and grouted because they LOVE it ... it's important to keep this "dry" look and maintain the colors they see now in the grout lines and small holes in the Travertine that were filled in with the grout.

I read the multiple threads running on what sealers to use, and it seems the ones that 'impregnate' are the best option for sealing and the desired look ... but research shows that some end up with a darker grout while others don't.

I have about 4 days to obtain product and put down one to two applications before the rest of the trades need access and furniture gets delivered. This job is along the North Shore of Chicago.

Any advise is greatly appreciated.

Thank you all for the info I've mined over the last year or so and for your advice in this thread.

Gregory Saint-James
Saintly Designs
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Unread 07-13-2015, 03:50 AM   #2
MDS
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F-721 is a penetrating flouropolymer sealer that will provide a great seal with no color change. Water based sealers are fine for the first coat but if you want a second coat it would need to be solvent based to penetrate the first coat.

F-721 is a hybrid concentrate which means you can dilute with water on the first coat then with alcohol for the second. Plus you save money on shipping a concentrate. Order today at F-721.com and you will have it tomorrow via FedEx ground.
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Unread 07-13-2015, 10:11 PM   #3
SaintlySins
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Thanx Mike.

Going to wait through tomorrow for other opinions before ordering. But I am appreciative of your speedy reply.
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Unread 07-14-2015, 02:57 PM   #4
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Fila FOB ECO solvent free.
(and ALWAYS test first whatever you use.)
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Unread 07-16-2015, 06:02 PM   #5
SaintlySins
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So ... after a bit of testing in a corner closet and too much time spent surfing the internet, forums, sub-forums, and technical spec papers, I ended up using Dupont StoneTech Professional Series "Maximum BulletProof Sealer".

Why? - Because there are pets in the house, so fumes wouldn't be an issue. Because diluting and/or/later adding alcohol is too complicated for the guys I have working for me and they'd never get the consistency correct each mix. Because it was readily available at a lower price through my local distributor than it was from any On-Line Discount house after shipping.

One coat in the morning. Following day a second coat. Today a light, third coat with the remaining product. Each coat went down better than the first and it was easy to see where the more porous areas of the tile absorbed more and dried faster than the denser areas. I saw it again in the second coat, and by the third coat it was all absorbing and drying evenly.

We finished up today and I am very, very happy with the results. More importantly, so is the client.

Thanks to all who responded and all who contributed to other threads with similar questions.

Now time for a drink!
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Unread 07-17-2015, 06:19 AM   #6
MDS
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Bulletproof is a good sealer. Kudos for finding it locally for under $100/gallon.

I'm a little worried about that stone though. Many will contend that good travertine does not absorb any sealer but doesn't hurt to hit it while sealing grout. If that stone was still absorbing a THIRD coat of Bulletproof it probably is not travertine.
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Unread 07-17-2015, 09:46 AM   #7
SaintlySins
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Hi Mike,

In honesty, it wasn't under $100 ... but just a few bucks more. It's the shipping fees that bumps the price of getting it shipped in from a web-site that offers lower pricing that makes the price higher than my local distributor.

As for the Travertine, I'm certain it's legit (knowing the source - and I'd wager it wouldn't be worth re-boxing 1200 sq.ft of tile to fool someone), but that's not said to be argumentative, as I put the blame on me for not expressing the details about where the product absorbed on the third coat. The areas that took well to a third coat were the more visually porous areas of the stone, while the more dense areas of stone the product sat on top and had little to no absorption which needed to be wiped off. Some might say that the third coat of sealer only filled the minutely small holes that grout didn't fill and did little else ... and I agree. Yet I'd rather have the sealer filling those holes than something that might stain getting in there and eventually bleeding through the tile.

Normally I'd not have done a third coat, but signed them into a maintenance contract to come back and condition/re-seal every year ... (which they did for the whole house) ... but it's when I found out that a third of the floor was going to be a wine cellar, and the other part a tasting and party room ... I put down the third coat for "me" ... I do not want to come back to service a floor only to see red wine stains ! ! !

I don't usually use Travertine on a floor or in bathrooms as it's just too porous. I'm scared this might be one of those instances where future wine stains, two dogs and the slop that 2 small kids produce will ruin this floor ... so I'm pushing her towards one of those "Wand Vacuums" that also vac up fluids - instead of her wipe/swiping any of the fluids and smearing them across the floor and into more holes in the tile.

Designers need to understand how some products are not right for certain areas. It's my first job with this designer so I kept my mouth shut ... but now that we've developed a relationship, we're going to have a talk about this topic next week.
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Unread 07-17-2015, 08:37 PM   #8
Ron
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Hi Gregory,

This is the best impregnator I have found. Hard to get where I am. Check it out.

http://www.drytreat.com/sealers/resi...ain-proof.html

I haven't used this one yet but it is even better for more porous surfaces.
http://www.drytreat.com/sealers/residential/40sk.html
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Last edited by Ron; 07-17-2015 at 08:40 PM. Reason: Added link
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Unread 07-17-2015, 09:12 PM   #9
SaintlySins
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Thanks Ron.
I had read a bit about that product, but the only "tested" results I found were for outdoor applications around pools, pavers, and a (recycled) brick patio.

It wouldn't be for this indoor application as the solution is 50% alcohol based, so gas off might affect the animals in the house (a bit of a concern for the homeowners ;- )

A couple dealers aren't that far from where the Travertine was installed ... and Holy ShiRt stains ... that stuff is expensive! But with a 15 year guarantee ... it might be worth it in the long run.
They have another version without the 15 year guarantee that's a bit more 'normal' priced. I'll check it out soon as I do a fair amount of paver work too.
I'd love to try it on the out-door fireplaces we build ... I wonder how it would work to keep the roaring fire soot off the face of the brick and stone we use.

Thanks for the product tip.
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