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Unread 10-03-2007, 09:15 PM   #1
john h
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Is Running Bond ok for Tub Surround?

Hey All...

Hobby tilesetter here doing my first tub surround/bath wall wainscoting project, standard 60x30 tub. I had an idea to run my 8" tile with 1/8th grout in running bond throughout.

As I looked through the photos section, I noticed that stacked bond was by far the most common, and figured there may be a good reason for it! I'm thinking this may not be a good pattern choice, that eventually I'll end up with funky looking corners (tub surround back wall will have rouhgly 2" slivers). Any thoughts or general guidlines for running bond patterns?

Many thanks...

Last edited by john h; 10-03-2007 at 09:21 PM.
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Unread 10-03-2007, 09:21 PM   #2
dcousins
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that's very common too. i did running bond for my shower stall with 12x12 and plan on it for my current tub and shower surround with 9x12s. it is more of a challenge with respect to the funky corners. you will have to plan ahead to figure out where your slivers will be. Technically, you don't have to have the running bond continuously run from beginning to end, nor do you have to have the stacked pattern run that way. just be consistent. and I am thinking that surely there is a way you could shift your center to avoid such small splinters.
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Unread 10-03-2007, 09:46 PM   #3
john h
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Thanks Deborah!

With your help, I may be figuring some stuff out. I'm thinking to abandon running bond on the wainsctoting - I have two short walls with an outside corner and figure running bond might be a bit of an awkwark situation (aside from having to back miter that corner as well!).

Would it be acceptable to stop the running bond at the point where the waniscoting starts and go stacked bond from there? Ok, right?
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Unread 10-03-2007, 10:25 PM   #4
duneslider
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I like to have some sort of a transition piece between the two if I am going to change the pattern.

Why don't you let us know how you are planning on building the shower too. That way we can make sure everything is all good for the fantastic shower you will be building.

Bryan
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Unread 10-03-2007, 10:25 PM   #5
jdm
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John --

In my opinion, you should stick with one bond pattern or the other for the entire room. With running bond, since every row shifted by 1/2 a tile length from the rows above and below, there usually is no way to avoid some small cuts. (Remember that with stacked bond, the way to avoid slivers is to shift the layout by 1/2 tile, but with running bond, all that will do is shift the slivers from one row to the adjacent rows. It's just part of the game.)

And with running bond, it usually looks best to continue around corners with the piece trimmed off of the adjacent tile on the previous wall. (This makes it look almost like the tile was "folded" around the corner, and continues the running bond to the next wall. This can be problematic, however if the corner is not (at least close to) plumb, because the (alternate) rows on the next wall may not align vertically. In that case, you may have to trim the cut pieces from the previous wall a bit, or cut new pieces from whole tile a bit longer than the leftover pieces in order to get the next wall aligned vertically.

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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:33 PM   #6
john h
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Thanks Jeff & Bryan...

Good suggestions. I'll keep it simple and just stack them all the way this time around.

the shower set up and plan is:

-Aquabond on the studs, draped into the tub and caulked underneath;
-Green board to 1/4" of the tub, caulked the seams/corners/screws;
-1/2" Hardibacker to 1"4 of the tub, fiberglass tape designed for the backerboard, caulked the seams/corners/screws

I'm shifting the pattern down about 3.5" so I've got fairly equal tiles top and bottom (going up to the ceiling, and there will be a mosaic highlight at eye level), saving the first tile row to do last, leaving 1/8th for caulking the tub (caulking the corners as well). Gotta back miter the outside corners at the transition from the shower surround hardibacker to the sheetrock where the waiscoting begins - no 1/4 rounds schluters nearby in my color, no corner rounds for this tile... Versabond thin set. 1/4 in trowel for the 8x8 porcelain tiles.

Another question... The subfloor is 3/4 ply and has some high seams. I was concerned about voids underneath the 1/4 hardiboard I was going to use for the floor, and was going to float some thin set in those areas to fill them in, then the vapor barrier, then the hardiboard on top. Proper method?

Thanks again...

Last edited by john h; 10-03-2007 at 11:39 PM.
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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:40 PM   #7
duneslider
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I would kick the greenboard in the shower. It is just going to be something that will get wet and create an environment for mold. Just put up your plastic then the 1/2 hardi board.

As for the floor, you don't need a vapor barrier there unless you plan on having A LOT of water on the floor.

If the seems are just a little high you can usually get away with sanding them down a little. If they are really bad then it would be good to use a leveler to level the floor out.

Not sure I follow what you plan on doing with the back miters into the sheetrock wall. It is getting late though and maybe I just need to sleep.

Bryan
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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:51 PM   #8
john h
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Thanks Bryan...

The side walls of the tub surround are about 61 1/2 apart, so I had to bring them in an extra inch with the green board and hardi on top to cover the edges of the tub. So now the hardibacker on the side walls extends 1/2" beyond the adjacent wall where the waiscoting will be going. I can do the back mitering on those narrow slivers to complete the short outside corner of the hardiboard, it just takes a little while.

Get some sleep, bro...
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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:56 PM   #9
duneslider
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In that case, I would put the sheetrock up, then vapor barrier, then hardi. You don't want the sheetrock getting wet at all.

Those will be tough little pieces to cut but sounds like you are expecting that.
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