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Unread 08-04-2006, 07:20 PM   #1
civerson
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Christine's Bathroom Project

Hi! I've been lurking here for awhile now as I get the remodel of my bathroom underway. I have to say I was more confident in this DIY project BEFORE I started reading all the posts here! Everyone, even newbies seem to know so much! I'm sure throughout this project I'll have many many questions so I'll start with an easy one. My husband and I are putting in a basement bathroom and my project is the shower. I wanted to do a shower niche on an exterior wall but I just read in John's Keridi Shower book that he doesn't recommend it in places that have severe freezing.......does Minnesota count? He makes a good point that this eliminates the insulation in that particular spot. I'm wondering what others think on this as I really wanted to do this. The niche would be just about at the frost line. There are no interior walls available to build the niche into. Thanks in advance!
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Unread 08-04-2006, 08:35 PM   #2
cx
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Welcome, Christine.

Well, yeah, I'd say Minnesooota counts as a cold place. I mean, really, you live there and can't tell you're freezing you patootie off for nine months outa the year?

How are you planning to build the wall where the niche will be? If you can just frame a 2x4 wall in there with good insulation, you'll be in the same situation as peoples who live in more moderate climates since most of your wall will only see temps a little below freezing, if I understand the situation. The whole wall is below grade in the outside, yes?

But since you are starting from bare concrete or block walls, why not build a 2x6 wall on that side and give youself room for a little insulation behind the niche, too?

And maybe run some heat through the framed wall on that side. Or maybe move south a few hunnert miles - a few being maybe ten - and not hafta worry about whether you wanna take a shower or ice skate inna basement on any given day.

Whatcha doing for a drain? You already plumbed for a shower there when the place was built?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-07-2006, 06:41 PM   #3
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Yes the niche will be almost all, if not all, below grade so I don't think we will have a freezing problem. Although we did have one plumber tell us he would have wanted to build an interior wall to put the shower plumbing in, I think that is being over cautious. The walls are already framed so we don't have the option of building a 2x6 wall. I think we will be adequately be able to insulate around the niche as it won't be that big anyway. The shower is only 3'x3'. Plus, in an old house up like ours, it is going to be cold in the winter, regardless of how much insulation we do!

We will be installing a drain. The previous owners installed a toilet only and then dry walled and tiled the bathroom so we've ripped all of that out and are adding a shower and a sink to complete the bathroom. I've added pictures of where we are currently at.
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Unread 08-08-2006, 05:45 AM   #4
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You could fur out the 2x4 studs with 2x2s to get you more insulation. Also, consider polystyrene foam board insulation. More R for the inch.
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Unread 08-12-2006, 01:05 PM   #5
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Hi. I have a couple of questions today. First is we were going to do a 36x36 shower and use the Schluter Kerdi Tray. We are now considering doing a 36x48 shower. Can we still use the 48x48 tray and cut it down to 36x48? Also can we do a brick shower curb with the schluter tray?

Also we will be installing a glass shower door and wall.....eventually. We are going to install 2x4s today to support this and wondered if we should install 2 2x4s for each stud for added support or if 1 is sufficient. Thanks!
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Unread 08-15-2006, 07:08 PM   #6
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Treated Wood

I've been reading around the forum that treated wood should not be used in the shower. Most of the framing in our bathroom is untreated but the bottoms of the walls are done in treated and we have to replace one corner stud (in the shower) due to rotting and were going to do treated. We think this one corner rotted out because the base board was the only untreated one in the whole bathroom. Will this treated wood be a problem? If yes, then how do we keep the framing from rotting in the future? It is on a basement external cement wall. Thanks!
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Unread 08-15-2006, 07:59 PM   #7
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Sorry you got missed there, Christine. When that happens (gets busy hereabouts sometimes and threads slip by) and you don't get a response in a reasonable time, just make another post and bump your thread back to the top of the queue for some attention.

You can cut down the Kerdi tray, but it doesn't work as well when you do that because it's no longer level around the perimeter. I think the only time those are worthwhile is if you build your shower floor to the exact size as their tray. For any other situation, building a mud pre-slope gives you a better floor. Actually, I'd build a mud floor no matter what size the shower is. It's very easy to do and far less expensive.

Not sure I understand the framing question, but if you're talking about the studs that frame the openings for the shower, yes, those should at least be doubled.

Treated wood is a poor choice for any framing where tile will be installed because the wood will shrink dramatically as it dries and tends to warp and crown and twist whilst doing so. Far better to use kiln dried framing lumber. The sill plate (that which I think you are calling a base board) can usually be treated wood without as much problem, but I still favor kiln dried wood there, too. You can simply install a strip of foam insulation made specifically for the purpose, or just a strip of roofing felt between the wood and the concrete, both for your plates and the wall framing. If there is enough moisture present to rot the framing with that kind of installation, you have a different problem to address.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-12-2006, 04:02 PM   #8
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I've built a niche from 2x4s and attached a piece of sheetrock for the back. Can I Kerdi right over the wood or do I need to cover all the wood in the niche with sheetrock?

My other question is we are using the prefab Schluter shower floor. I wanted to build a foot rest with bricks but the Schulter floor is so lightweight it doesn't seem possible that it can support the weight of bricks. Any thoughts on this?

Last edited by civerson; 10-12-2006 at 04:11 PM.
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Unread 10-12-2006, 04:38 PM   #9
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Hi Christine,

Cover all the wood framing with sheetrock before applying the Kerdi.

I've never used a foam floor, but I've had samples of them, and I wouldn't have a problem loading bricks on one.
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Unread 10-25-2006, 08:20 PM   #10
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We've attempted putting up Kerdi for the first time tonight and don't think we've done it right. We've therefore taken it down and hope to be more informed when we attempt this again tomorrow night. So here are my questions:

1. What type of thinset should we use? I had read on this website that we should use unmodified but missed the fact that everyone hates CustomBlend so that is what we were using. Any advice? Should we absolutely go with something else or is CustomBlend at all acceptable? If we stay with CustomBlend what problems are we looking at?

2. I've attached pictures of our coverage below and I would like to know how it looks. We don't think the coverage is good enough and we think part of it was that the thinset dried so quickly. I believe we mixed it was thin enough to start. What did we do wrong and what should it look like?

3. Finally, when we scrapped the thinset off, it has now left our wall somewhat bumpy and we've gouged it a few times. What do we do to remedy this situation?

I guess we are not off to the best start with the Kerdi! Any help is appreciated!!

Christine
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Unread 10-25-2006, 08:44 PM   #11
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Hi Christine, you can use Versabond too if you can get it, it's lightly modified. I use TEC Full Set. The coverage looked pretty good except for the middle. What you want to do is mix the mud so it is a bit thicker than pancake batter. When you say we've I assume you have help. Try doing from the top of the wall down and only spread the top half first and work that in while your "helper" holds the rest of the piece then do the bottom.
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Unread 10-25-2006, 09:48 PM   #12
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cx: more info on cutting the schluter trays please?

CX- can you elaborate on why it is not a good idea to cut the schluter tray down to fit her shower? we just returned a fiberglass shower pan and were planning on ordering the 60x32 shower kit from the tile experts. This is what the help person recommended. Our shower measures 48x34 and he said that we could cut this down to fit.
- oh, i just called the tile experts. basically is the issue that the perimeter heights are even and then when you cut one side, the uncut side height will be higher than the cut side? The man said going from 60 to 48 is the absolute limit to where this will be a problem. does this sound right?
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Last edited by dcousins; 10-25-2006 at 10:13 PM.
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Unread 10-26-2006, 04:22 PM   #13
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Bump - Any other advise on my post #10?? Thanks!
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Unread 09-30-2007, 01:17 PM   #14
civerson
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Glass Installation

I have a couple questions on the installation of a frameless glass shower enclosure that I'm hoping someone can help me with.

We ordered our glass to install ourselves. My first question, is the place we ordered our glass from, took our measurements and then made adjustments for the clearence between the glass and wall, glass and glass, hinges and clamps. Based on the numbers, we thought we needed to move our line out slightly. We are doing a fixed panel, and an adjacent fixed panel and a door. We installed the 2 fixed panels and now we have way to much space between the fixed panel and door. Should we have used our original line?

My second question is if we take down the fixed panels and move the clamps, will the original holes cause us waterproofing problems or can we fill these in with silicon and be okay?

Finally, one of the fixed panels has a chip in the corner. Is this a problem and does this make the glass more vulnerable (a concern if we are going to take it down again and to move it). Cosmetically, it is at the bottom so it won't really be noticable.

Thanks!
Christine
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Unread 09-30-2007, 03:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Should we have used our original line?
Yes. How much are we talking about? 1/2"? Has the door sweep been installed? There is a small amount of adjustment at the hinges but that will increase the door/wall gap. Where is the showerhead in relation to the door. If it's on the opposite wall there shouldn't be a problem with leakage.

Quote:
My second question is if we take down the fixed panels and move the clamps, will the original holes cause us waterproofing problems or can we fill these in with silicon and be okay?
Fill and silicone should be fine. Not much else you can do.

Quote:
Finally, one of the fixed panels has a chip in the corner. Is this a problem and does this make the glass more vulnerable (a concern if we are going to take it down again and to move it). Cosmetically, it is at the bottom so it won't really be noticable.
The small chip will not affect the strength of a tempered glass door.
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