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Unread 05-01-2020, 09:19 AM   #1
rkadish
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Pool Coping install

Good day to everyone. I have a fiberglass pool with a concrete skirt. I recently purchased Retro pool coping tile from Florida Brick and Clay along with Roterra Slate Tile with Meshed Back for the skirt.

My question is what to use to set the pool coping and the slate tiles. The edge of the pool has about 6 inches before it meets the concrete, the coping would overlap the concrete by an inch. I have read through most of the posts and have come up with the understanding that I need a polymer modified thinset to use for the coping. Should I use the same for the slate tile? Should I use that at all? Should I mix in the extra polymer liquid?

The concrete has high spots near the pool lip and at every section where the crack seam was troweled. Should I rent a grinder/surfacer to level the area out? Would the thinset have any problem sticking to a ground concrete?

I am in eastern North Carolina so I have mild winters with to no or very little freezing freezing.

The pool is salt water.
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Unread 05-01-2020, 10:03 AM   #2
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Can you post any pics of the pool? Is the top of the bond beam flat? I wouldn't be using those slate tiles for the pool.
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Unread 05-04-2020, 06:00 AM   #3
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Pics of pool

here are some pics of what I am working with.
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Unread 05-04-2020, 06:01 AM   #4
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two more

would not fit in the other post
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Unread 05-04-2020, 05:50 PM   #5
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Hi Robben, thanks for the pics. Fiberglass isn't something we bond tiles to very often so I'm not sure the best adhesive to use. Whatever you use, I would probably cut off the coping so the joint falls directly over the fiberglass/cement transition. I might would even cut the radius end too so it fits the fiberglass radius better.

Is that a Cool-crete, deck?
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Unread 05-04-2020, 07:54 PM   #6
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Is that real slate or a porcelain mimic? If it's real slate I don't think it would last well in the long term. If it's porcelain or ceramic some good modified thinset that can be used in a submersible application would work. Same with the coping. A good modified thinset like you said.
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Originally Posted by Robben
the coping would overlap the concrete by an inch
So you're going to let it hang over the back edge of the concrete bond beam? Not sure that's a good idea. If you thinset it to the adjacent slab it will eventually crack or break loose and then eventually crack if any heavy weight comes across. They're only what, 1/2" thick? You might consider cutting to match the curve of the bond beam. Doesn't have to match exactly but you don't want an inch cantilever I don't think.
I would grind the concrete down like you said. The modified thinset should bond well to it.
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Unread 05-05-2020, 09:47 AM   #7
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re

It is real slate, there are some that are separating or splitting but I think a little glue and the grout may help in holding them together.

I have considered trimming the coping to match the pool radius. i do plan to get a surface grinder and go around the deck to level it out by the pool edge.

Should I fill the seams?
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Unread 05-05-2020, 09:51 AM   #8
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grinding

The reason for the grinding is that there are high spots from the troweling.
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Unread 05-05-2020, 10:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
I think a little glue and the grout may help in holding them together
Maybe for a short while but I think that will be a recurring problem.
Quote:
Should I fill the seams?
Fill what seams? The joint between the new coping and surrounding surface? That would get a caulk/sealant in between the two. Sika makes some self leveling sealant that can be used.
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Unread 05-05-2020, 04:56 PM   #10
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I've always heard that it's not a good idea to tile over cool-crete, that you would need to grind it down to the concrete, which might be 1/8-1/4 inch. I would look into this before tiling.
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Unread 06-01-2020, 05:42 AM   #11
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lost the thread

I lost this thread for a little bit but found the site again.

@ Davy, there is no cool-crete on this skirt just concrete

@ Jerry, by seams I meant the Control joints or groover joints. I had planned on using a self leveling sealant. I am using Master Seal SL1.

I do appreciate your input on this.
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Unread 06-02-2020, 07:09 AM   #12
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Robben I installed that exact stone about 14 years ago on a porch. We used LFT thinset mortar and we had to snap the lines somewhere between a 45-22.5 degrees to have a straight line to set them to. They interconnect at an angle.


EDIT:When I say LFT mortar we added sand to our regular mortar that's not necessary anymore.
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Unread 06-03-2020, 11:23 AM   #13
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I think you need to re think the slate in this application. terrible choice. do a little search on it in this application.
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Unread 06-06-2020, 08:06 AM   #14
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why is it bad

John619 what makes your opinion say it is a bad choice? I have read through many of the articles in this forum and have not found any definitive answers.
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Unread 06-06-2020, 08:21 AM   #15
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I'm afraid John is right. Find out where the slate comes from. If it's Chinese or Indian slate, it's a very soft slate that tends to deteriorate when used in showers and on patios. Just going by the colors, I'd say it's Chinese slate. The colors are pretty but it doesn't hold up good in the long run. Here in the US, Vermont slate is much harder and holds up much better but might even be questionable on an exterior pool deck. Vermont slate doesn't have the variety of colors like the others.

Recently I went back to a job where I installed Vermont slate on a covered patio 20+ years ago and it still looked great. But, being covered has a lot to do with it.
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