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Unread 11-11-2011, 07:59 AM   #1
ususer
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Tile Saw Advice, Please help...newby

Hi,
I need a wet tile saw. I'm going to tile a backsplash and perhaps flooring as well.
I want to spend <=$200.

Sorry can't provide links...for some reason?

I saw this at HF: Chicago Electric 1.5 Horsepower 7" Bridge Tile Saw Item # 98265
They have really good reviews for it.

I also saw this at Lowes:
Kobalt 7" Bench Tile Saw with Stand Item #: 325791


Which of these two is better...they are similarly priced. Also if there is another recommendation in the same price range that is better than both of these that I found, please share.

Thanks in advance!
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Unread 11-11-2011, 08:34 AM   #2
HooKooDoo Ku
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Based on the good reviews I saw on the Lowe's web site, I bought the Kobalt saw you reference.

If I had to do it over again, I'd pony up the money and at least move upto the ~$300 Kobalt 7" Sliding Tray Saw with Stand - Item #325792.

The 325791 basically throws lots of water in the air because the blade simply spins through a tub of water. But my biggest disappoinment work with it is how difficult it is to work with pushing tile through a fixed blade. Basically, I spent $200 for a saw that was sort of difficult to work with. It's ability to cut on an angle is a joke, because the blade is fixed and the base tilts (so all you can do is cut a minor corner).

But the Sliding Tray Saw means that you get to keep the tile fixed and move the blade over the tile.

Now I'll admit the $200 saw deserves the good reviews it gets. It's not a bad saw. But having used it to tile an entire bathroom with some thick tile (the Rialto tile you see at Lowe's), I now wished I had spent the extra $100 for what seems to be the convenience of a sliding tray rather than having to slide the tile.

Of course if you're willing to push to $300... I'm sure there are others who would recomend you move on upto some of the MK brand of wet saws (but now you're starting at around $500).
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Unread 11-11-2011, 09:30 AM   #3
John Bridge
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Hi Ken,

I think any $200 saw is going to have its drawbacks, but if it does a good job of cutting the tile it's worth the money.
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Unread 11-11-2011, 09:51 AM   #4
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Ok...so you guys don't recommend the harbor freight saw? It has the file fixed, but the saw slides. I was thinking of the kobalt for $300, but I don't know. I mean I can get a sliding saw for $200 from Harbor Freight...

If I go a bit more than $200 can anyone recommend something better? I'm so confused...
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:07 AM   #5
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How much are you spending on tile? What size tile are you cuttting? Besides straight cuts, what other cuts to you anticipate having to make? Have you looked at second-hand saws? Have You considered buying a more expensive saw and then selling it when you are done?

Basically, more money buys you the ability to cut larger tiles and make more complex cuts easily. As a doityourselfer with four bathrooms and a couple of kitchens under my belt, I went from an $80 Plasplugs fixed blade and no tray to a $250 MK Diamond fixed blade and sliding tray to an $800 DeWalt with sliding tray and tilting blade. All of these saws met my needs at the time, i.e., they did what I needed them to do, but it probably would have been a heck of a lot easier if I'd just started with the DeWalt.

The other aspect of this is, anyone who buys a couple thousand dollars of tile and then cheaps out on the saw, needs to reexamine their priorities. And you can always sell it afterward.

Have fun!
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:12 AM   #6
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I know you said $200 but you may want to try this one: 2.5 Horsepower 10" Industrial Tile/Brick Saw Item # 95385 for $279

it also is at H.F. but it is easier to use than a bridge saw I think, may not be the best for its type but it worked just fine for my bathroom. You will need a blade though as they do not come with any
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:15 AM   #7
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Hi,
I'm completely new to this. I do not plan on buying $1000s of dollars worth of tile. I need to do a kitchen backsplash, for my house and a friends. Then put tile around the top of the bath tub. So far that's it. Maybe later tile the bathroom floor.

pwgsx: thanks for the reply. I didn't know the bridge saw is hard to use. I may get the one you suggested for $279....

Thanks
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:29 AM   #8
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Ken, consider selling your saw on E-bay or Craigslist after you are done with all of your projects. Usually, you can get about 1/2 the retail price. That allows you to buy a better saw for the same money.
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:42 AM   #9
scut207
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I think the buy and sell is much better than the below the table saw... If I could do it again I would!

Tile saw 1 me 0

safety glasses are a must and you cant see anything after 2 nanoseconds.
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:50 AM   #10
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scut207: lol...I'm not following you. You do look funny in the picture though ;-)
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Unread 11-11-2011, 10:53 AM   #11
scut207
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that's porcelain dust and water, coating me the sliding saws (blade above table) are not nearly as bad from what i hear...
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Unread 11-12-2011, 01:04 AM   #12
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Ken,

I think he's saying if you use this type of saw with the blade below the cutting deck

Name:  skil_tile_saw.jpg
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and add water, the result will be an operator that looks like Brian as pictured above. Well Brian, I'm sold on the blade above the cutting deck as pictured in this unpopular model:

Name:  dewalt_tile_saw.jpg
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Size:  45.9 KB

Ken, you may not even need a saw, depending on the size and hardness of the tiles you need to cut. I tiled a tub surround with 4-1/4 tiles just using a snap cutter. If you're cutting stone or large porcelain, you'll probably need a saw.
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Unread 11-12-2011, 05:50 AM   #13
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won't do big jobs, but for what you describe check this one out. it was originally $250 a couple of years ago. now $99.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...&Ntpc=1&Ntpr=1
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Unread 11-14-2011, 10:07 AM   #14
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i agree, I had one like that skill brand above, man it sucked. It was hard to do any fine detailed cuts with water splashing all in your face and then trying to square up the guide rail, that was horrible. For that reason I returned it and got the saw with the sliding tray into the blade. Much better!!
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Unread 11-14-2011, 11:58 AM   #15
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Homers used to carry Husky sliding tray saws but dropped them for the Rigid version. I used the Husky for a bathroom and it did everything I needed once I spent some time getting everything aligned. Menards now sells the same saw under a new name for $259. It never sprayed any water on me, but you need a backstop behind it to stop spray. I used a piece of foam insulation board, and placed the whole saw cart on a plastic tarp.

I have no regrets about this saw, even the factory blade got the job done with an occasional brick cut to keep it sharp. I supplied only clean water from a 5gal bucket to keep the pump clean.
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