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Unread 07-27-2004, 09:02 PM   #1
RandyL
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Sealed Slip Joint

Looking at steam room spec in TCA handbook , it shows a sealed slip joint and calls for them in all corners. Anyone know what exactly they are? I was hoping to get an answer tommorrow morning but if not ,no problemo.

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Unread 07-27-2004, 09:30 PM   #2
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My understanding has been that the sealed slip joint was only required at the wall/ceiling junction, Randy. The way it's worded in the Handbook could lead a fella to think it's required at wall plane intersections, too, but I don't think that's the case.

It is also my understanding that the joint is stuffed with backer rod if necessary and caulked.

Ain't never done one, just listened to the big guys talkin' about it.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 07-28-2004, 05:36 AM   #3
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I think it's a normal joint where one plane of tile goes behind the other. More TCA jibberish. Sometimes those guys sit around the table and create new words and terms.
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Unread 07-28-2004, 05:48 AM   #4
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HA..........gibberish........ Just looks like a backer rod to me too CX. that's what I'll be calling it today. I'm doing a steam shower obviously. Ceiling was pitched 2" per foot. I also did some searching and found that it takes roughly 45 minutes for water to start dripping down on you if the ceiling is flat......FLAT.......... So I would think that in a residential setting 2" may really not be necessary. 45 minutes is a long time. I remember being in a sauna once and was good for about 5 minutes then I had to stagger out of there.
THis got me thinking. MAybe someone could invent a special pot or something to put in the steam shower this way you can steam your veggies at the same time. What do ya's think? Is it a winner..............................patent pending...........
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Unread 07-28-2004, 06:27 AM   #5
MHI
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All the steam showers I build these days are flat tops. I started doing it that way mainly because my customers were concerned with how it might look with bigger, odd shaped showers. Nobody has had a problem with condensation dripping, and when your are in the shower, you're going to get wet anyway.

1/8 inch gap between all CBU joints, wall corners and celling. Fill the gap with 100% silicone.
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