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Unread 09-08-2022, 08:53 PM   #1
GaryTarr
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Tiling a hallway with a pinwheel pattern

Hi All,

I am planning the tiling of a hallway with a pinwheel pattern. See below. Although I don't have a lot of experience, I have tiled some before, but never with a pattern. The way I have tiled in the past is to set all the field tiles first. Then come back and fill in the edge pieces. I was wondering what the common practice is when tiling with a pattern.

Thanks in advance,
Gary

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Unread 09-08-2022, 09:44 PM   #2
Tool Guy - Kg
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When it comes to a pattern like this in a narrow hall, it would waste a lot of time leaving the perimeter tiles out. There would be so much fussy cleaning of the excess thinset mortar at the perimeter…then there would be a lot of extra time spent spreading thinset mortar for the perimeter tiles the next day. In my opinion, work the pattern methodically the full width of the hallway, working from one end to the other. You will have your hands full with fussing around with the pattern, so you should expect it to go slower than your last tile layinng job.

Quick couple questions: Are both tiles the identical thickness?

Are you removing the vinyl or planning to go over it?

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Unread 09-09-2022, 03:03 AM   #3
CaliGrown
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Chalk-line, pre-cut and go!!!

Unless you have a helper, it’ll save you time in the long run to set the full width as you go vs. coming back and detailing it. ‘Specially with a pattern it only takes being off a hair at the beginning before it’s inches out after accumulative error comes into play :/
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Unread 09-09-2022, 04:53 AM   #4
Just In Tile LLC
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I agree on setting all cuts as you go on this, I will install field tile and cuts later ONLY if it's square tile and if they share a common grout joint. Trying to match up height on two already set pieces is an easy way to up your chances of lippage.

On complicated patterns (like versaille) I dry layout the pattern somewhere and reference it when choosing what tile to make my cut with. Open areas it's easy to see what comes next, but when it gets tighter and more cut up you'll be scratching your head.
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Unread 09-09-2022, 08:55 AM   #5
GaryTarr
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Thanks for your advice.

I wanted to thank all three of you for your advice. It sounds like the way to go is to make the edge cuts in advance.

In answer to Tool Guy - Kg. The tiles are very close in thickness but not identical. I was planning on using the Spin Doctor leveling system to reduce the lippage. I have used them before, and they seem to work well. As to the subfloor, it is vinyl on top of cement. I was not planning to remove the vinyl as it is down pretty tight.

Thanks again
Gary
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Unread 09-09-2022, 12:17 PM   #6
jadnashua
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Vinyl comes in more than one variety. IF it's a cushioned vinyl, you should not tile over it. Cleaning all of the wax and other potential crud off of it is essential and it must be very well attached.

Vinyl can hide a crack in the concrete, leading to a tile failure later. It's probably a better idea to remove it, but that's up to you.

How much difference in thickness's are the two tiles?
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Unread 09-09-2022, 12:47 PM   #7
GaryTarr
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Hi Jim,

Thanks for your advice. I measured a couple of tiles, and the difference is about 1/32 inch.

Gary
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