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Unread 10-31-2004, 07:46 PM   #1
B Luv
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Job Bidding

I am finally starting a tile setting buisness of my own. I have apprentenced under two of the finest tile setters I have ever seen. Unfortunatly they taught me everything I need to know except how to Bid on a project. I have a pretty good idea but I'm not sure what all to include. Any advice or clues would be a great help. B.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 05:12 AM   #2
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Read this Link for starters.

You mention you worked under 2 of the finest Tilesetters but you dont say where, how long or what your experiances include.
Location is important as competitive bidding is a variable regionally.
You want to be competitive ,however,you dont want to be a whore in the market.It took many years for tilesetters to get where they are wage wise and all a whore in the market does is drive down prices so nobody makes a living.I get along with every tileman in my area even though they are my competition.
If i were driving down prices and making them compete that likely wouldnt be the case.

So, If you would like help getting started,how about a little more information?
You wouldnt be the first we have helped and you certainly wont be the last.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 09:32 AM   #3
B Luv
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Thanks for responding Todd. sorry, I may not have been very clear. I live in a small town in southern Colorado. I recently moved from a ski town near Vail, Co where the price of service is crazy high. where I live now things are a little different. I know what my market is and already have a good relationship with the few other tile setters in the area. All they have asked of me is to not low ball them. Which is fine because I didn't get into this to go broke. What I'm not sure about is what to include on the bid. Should I inculde every detail of what needs to be done, should I itemize the bill, explain that extras will cost more? The little things like that I'm not sure about. I would just ask the guys that trained me but one has moved back east and I can not find him. The other has moved back to Europe. Thanks again for the help. B.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 04:47 PM   #4
scott anthony
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B
Lets just call you B OK
Price by the sq ft only if its a simple routine no extra job with basic materials and that price will depend on your market.
Most of your jobs should be based by the hour but you need too be careful, a job that you may think might take you two weeks might take you three.
Todd has an awsome confusing formula I remember reading a while back.

But if I can stress any thing it's this CYA ( cover your ass). Don't do plumbers work and if your not an electrician leave it. Wait until you find out how much a leaking toilet can cost you. It hasent happened to me but I'v heard the horror stories. It's bad enough fixing your own mistakes that may randomly occure.
This is mostly a hit and miss your first couple years. And like they say dont cut throat anybody, at least not on purpose.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 07:36 PM   #5
Davy
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Lets say I'm bidding a shower. I figure by the sq ft for starters, then I add 200 bucks for jamb labor, 400 bucks to build a haydock block seat, mud and tile it, 200-400 extra for a liner design, sometimes more depending on how complicated. 1.50 sq ft to seal it. I break it all down.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 07:48 PM   #6
rob 223
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Start by figureing what your day is worth, then add it up time wise, and round it up the half day. Then I double check it with the going square foot rates and if youre too high adjust or too low then adjust. Going by an hourly or day rate is the best way to go, because if you can get it down where you can estimate by timewise then if you loose a job because you were too high its a good thing because you wouldnt be able to make your going rate, whereas by the foot you might have taken it and made less than normal.
Prices vary, the lowest I hear any pro go would be 3.00 a foot over flat concrete and from there the prices can exceed $15 a foot for complicated, custom or even just really small jobs where you lose on travel time.
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Unread 11-01-2004, 10:59 PM   #7
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Davy has some good points for you as do the others.I would like to stress one thing though.
Davy breaks his down.
I would say this.Write out your bid and include in it everything you are supplying and everything you are doing.(example,Shower base with Vapor barrier,Preslope of 1/1/4" nominal deckmud,Membrane and final slope of 1/1/4" deckmud.Built in 2 shelk niche waterproofed with redgaurd waterproofing membrane) etc etc.
Do not,and i cant stress this enough,Do Not break this down into individual prices on your bid.
Do Not put down total square footage on your bid.
List everything and give a total Price.List it all and tell them thats the price less any hidden damage or changes made before or during the project.No surprises.
By doing it this way its more difficult for them to shop your numbers.
You did the work on this bid,How would you feel if another guy could just glance at it and say yep i can do it for 250.00 less.
Pretty hard for them to do that if the bid is lacking the actual footages and amounts of materials required isnt it. They actually have to go measure and do the work.
Customers have asked me for breakdowns.I politely tell them I dont do that.I give a total price to do the job properly and completely.I have several reasons i do bids the way i do them mr customer.Suffice it to say that the only items you are interested in is that the job is completed to your satisfaction and what its going to cost you.My breakdown of individual prices would really only be of interest to another contractor and if he/she would like to bid your work ,i believe it only fair that he does his own work
People understand this and if they dont, its not a job you want or a customer you need.This type customer is trouble with a capital T
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Unread 11-02-2004, 01:36 PM   #8
B Luv
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Thanks

Thanks for your help everyone. That is exactly what I was looking for. I hope someday I can help someone outjust as you've all helped me. Thanks, B.
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Unread 11-02-2004, 04:20 PM   #9
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B Heed Todd's last post. Especially the part about not needing to break it down for clients. Let the competition do their own work.

Pay attention also to Rob223 about valuing and understanding your time. This is where it takes time to figure these things out. It takes a while to learn how and why to walk away from work.


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Unread 11-02-2004, 07:29 PM   #10
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Actually, I break it down for the builders I work for. I was just showing B Luv. how I do it but I also do like Todd sometimes for a individual. The builder I'am working for now isn't out looking for a better price so I don't worry about my prices being broken down. The individuals are shopping around most likely.
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Unread 11-04-2004, 05:59 AM   #11
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Dang Davy, and here i thought maybe i was teaching an old dog a new trick
Should known you knew better,after all,It aint your first Rodeo is it!!
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TIP YOUR TILE MAN, His Retirement plan is not nearly as lucrative as yours and his waning years will be far more painful to boot.
He gives much so you can have a Beautiful Home!!
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Unread 11-04-2004, 07:30 PM   #12
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Keep trying Todd.

I have done work for a decorator for nearly 20 years. She will have only a few jobs each year. She doesn't need prices broken down, she doesn't care about that, just a final number and what it includes. A bottom number is all she gets.
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Unread 11-04-2004, 09:56 PM   #13
bctile601
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B,

keep track of all of the work, and errand running that you do, the WHOLE costs of the materials including; handling times, delivery charges, taxes, freight .... etc. the more information you can accumulate for each quarter of business will help you determine where you make money, where you don't, what your fast at, what your not, who is there for you, and who is not ( completely other topic ) even your fuel mileage makes for bits of data that could seriously help when you crunch numbers trying to haul in a big fish that every one of your competitors are after.

actual work time maybe the biggest factor, material costs, payroll, and their efficiency, time spent in meetings, shagging material, going to landfill, estimates, estimates, estimates
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Unread 11-04-2004, 10:15 PM   #14
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Do not put your spoon into the pot which does not boil for you.
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Unread 11-04-2004, 10:35 PM   #15
tileguytodd
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If I can get you a Job thats 10,000 s/f for 10,000.00 how many more would you want??

If i can get you a Job thats 1000 s/f for 10,000.00 how many more do you need??
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TIP YOUR TILE MAN, His Retirement plan is not nearly as lucrative as yours and his waning years will be far more painful to boot.
He gives much so you can have a Beautiful Home!!
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