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Unread 08-31-2021, 01:58 PM   #1
MiniMe
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Would you say that this tile layout is acceptable?

I am using 24x24 tiles (nominal is 23.6") and 1/16" grout lines

I would like to get your feedback about this layout

The idea was to minimize cuts and avoid tiling to the ceiling as it is not even

What is still missing in the picture is a tile plinth (there is a small strip at the bottom that is not filled in but consider that I could:

-start at shower base level (2") and then the top of the tiles in the shower would be 70.8+(3x1/16) which seems a little bit low to me especially if I order shower panels to match that

-start at 4" from the floor level (2" above the shower -not including the tile flange). This will raise the top level of the tiles a little bit and it will give me a decent size plinth on the walls that do not get tiles

Tile layout considerations:

-I centered two vertical lines, one on the toilet sit and the other on the vertical middle axis of the mirror, vanity etc)

-within the shower I have not followed any guidelines, I could probably balance the tiles to the left and to the right of a vertical axis on the longer shower wall but so I would make equal size tiles in the first and the last column of tiles on that wall

What do you guys think, is it acceptable? What would you change ?
Second option is with balanced tile sizes in the shower along the long side of the shower
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Unread 09-01-2021, 09:31 AM   #2
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Is the small strip you see in the corner OK?

I am watching some youtobe vides before I go and ruin my tiles :-)) and I came across this video who shows a weird cut at the end of the current line he is working on
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Unread 09-01-2021, 10:27 AM   #3
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Welcome, Mini.

Please keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered. A moderator can give it a more generic title any time you'd like to suggest one.

Your first post is strictly aesthetic considerations and I steer clear of those as a rule. Tough enough to decide on my own projects. But we've got folks who really enjoy that kind of question and perhaps some will stop by.

In your second post, no, I wouldn't find such a "skinny" acceptable unless there was simply no way around it and there nearly always is. The tile industry standards recommend no cuts smaller than 1/2 a tile, but that's pretty unrealistic at times. You hafta find your own boundaries for acceptable layouts.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-01-2021, 11:10 AM   #4
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First and foremost: Stop watching this guy's videos unless you are already aware that he knows evidently nothing about waterproofing and you just want to see something else. That red waterproofing membrane should cover every square millimeter of the wet area, which in this case is a shower.

You're fine if were just looking for ideas on how to screw up the layout after incompletely waterproofing a wet area. I couldn't watch the whole thing, so maybe he had no choice, but at a glance it looks like he had a lot of room to get it, uh, better than that.

Also avoid: people that call themselves masters or experts. Some are, but the real ones usually don't put it up in your face. Sorry, these videos just make me angry and I cannot count the number of waterproofed screw heads I have seen in these videos. Flat shower pans (sometimes a rubber membrane screwed right down right on the subfloor) can often be found in the same video, and even some of the big box stores run flat-pan videos. REALLY, guys? Tile is a lot of work and expense, and to see something like this that is destined for early failure is just a disservice at best, not only to the customer who paid for that doomed shower job, but to the viewers of these helpful "how to" videos who "heard it from a master".

Edit: Maybe I was too harsh right there. Maybe I should give him the benefit of the doubt and assume there is a plastic sheet behind that CBU. But I doubt it.

The point is, proper moisture management is everything in a wet area. Without that, the most beautiful layout in the world will not live long enough to be fully enjoyed and will bring extra sorrow when it fails early. Tile is porous and is not waterproof. Grout is not considered waterproof -- even though some actually are, there is no guarantee they are fully bonded to the tile edges in such a way that it will keep water out. And that concrete backer unit (CBU) is not waterproof either. Water can and likely will make its way into the wall from those un-coated areas on the CBU in that video. I don't understand why the niche was considered important enough to waterproof (and the screw heads, of course), but not the whole thing. Oh, the humanity!
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Unread 09-01-2021, 11:23 AM   #5
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What the screenshot of that video shows is not part of my project but I was kind of shocked that the guy as said above calls himself some sort of master when even a beginner and DIYer like me can spot that mistake
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Unread 09-01-2021, 11:27 AM   #6
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Re my layout: I wanted to know if by positioning the tiles that way I am breaking any major rules
I know I am breaking one by putting the ~7" piece there
I should determine the center of that wall and start from there toward the corners as the corners might not be square and plumb. I am installing the cement board as we speak, I will do my best to get a square and a plumb corner there but I don't think there is better way when using 24x24 tiles on the mirror/shower panel wall
If you do please suggest a better approach
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Unread 09-01-2021, 11:45 AM   #7
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As for layout advice, it is aesthetically more pleasing to "wrap around" the corners. If it were a subway layout, for example, and you had a short tile at the end of a row, then you would place a short one at the beginning of the same row on the adjacent wall so that it looks like that tile got wrapped around the wall.

Perhaps competing with this is the fact that centering the field on the wall or floor usually looks better than starting at one edge. Usually...

Obstacles can throw it all in disarray. Just suck it up, but don't ignore them; that's an invitation to more skinnies than you thought would even be possible ("Ack, how can they ALL be slivers?!?!"). A weird sliver in a back corner somewhere is worth the sacrifice if it makes the eye-level window or niche come out right. On the other hand, a 1/4' sliver is unacceptable except on the very smallest tiles. Unless it is not. Go to step 1...

Just play with it a bit since you appear to have time. See why it looks odd to have a full tile next to a half tile like your drawing does.

If you are tiling the whole tub wall and shower, feel free to run the tile across the whole wall regardless of there the glass between them ends up; that is usually not a deciding feature.

So be ready to make compromises. It is usually inevitable. You will find the best compromise by taking whatever time it takes to find it. It is a lot easier to play at standing height with pieces of cardboard or paper cut to the size of the tile and hung up by a bit of tape than dragging around a bunch of heavy, sharp-edged tile that just loves to damage everything it touches.

These are just the very basics. The "masters" here might give you more advanced advice.
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Unread 09-01-2021, 11:53 AM   #8
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Is it too late to true up the walls? The larger the format the more critical that is, and it ramps up fast.

(personally, I am looking forward to the mega-tile fad ending. That cannot come soon enough for me. if this continues, we will soon be setting 96"x96" tile. Woo-hoo! it only needs two cuts for the whole wall! OK, boys, back it on in there... easy... easy...)

If you cannot true up the wall, you might consider down-sizing the tile. Just getting it under about ten inches will make life a lot easier in a lot of ways for a non-master. (I am an awful person)
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Unread 09-01-2021, 12:58 PM   #9
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thank you platypus, no it is not late to true up the walls, that is next
I just made sure the stud edges are coplanar so next is to install the cement board
So far half of the shower corner is ok (bottom half) but the things are a little bit off toward the top (no gap in the corner when I measure there but it goes out of square a little bit like 16" away to the left of the corner
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Unread 09-01-2021, 03:06 PM   #10
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I'd be wary of the walls in the corners not being perfectly vertical/plumb. Especially with trying to have full size tiles in each corner. Maybe consider going with ~23.25" tiles at each end (assuming 23.6" is full size) just in case. That would leave some adjustment room if you need to cut some tiles longer or shorter to keep the alignment of the tiles and adapt to a crooked wall.

If you're not set on that pattern yet, you could lay out multiple patterns. Say, shift your stack bond by half distance; try laying out 30% or 50% offset/running bond, etc. There's probably only 3-4 different layouts you'd be willing to consider: i'd recommend you map all the options you'd consider and identify the trade-offs of each and finally decide which you prefer.

What do the edges of the tiles look like? If the tiles have beveled ends or something, will it be a problem butting up that cut end of 7" tile adjacent to an uncut end?

I like idea of tiling up to ceiling. You could consider cutting the bottom row down by 5-7" to make the top row a taller piece, and also allow it to be cut to varying height to conform to an uneven ceiling?
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Last edited by PhilWA; 09-01-2021 at 03:18 PM. Reason: didn't realize those were square 24x24 tiles at first
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Unread 09-01-2021, 03:37 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by platypus
. Maybe I was too harsh right there.
nope not even a little bit, I was comment something similar earlier and I got a phone call while typing and never circled back. I saw a video he did years ago where he did a shower pan on the second floor, no liner no topical water proofing, nothing. Mud,tile write me a check
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Unread 09-01-2021, 05:18 PM   #12
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These are the tiles I am considering
The true white matter rectified tiles described in that pdf, 24x24

I can't imagine other patterns with tiles this big. Shifting the stack will ruin the effect that the large tiles have on a small room (make it look big by not having lots of lines)
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Unread 09-03-2021, 11:21 AM   #13
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Does 'large tile mortar' have any advantages when used on walls?

This is the only mortar I could find at home depot that says 'for large tiles`. My tiles are 24x24
As far as I understand the term is interchangeable with thinset in this case.

Reading the instructions it says it is good for floors, it prevents sagging as large tiles tend to `burry` themselves into the underlaying thinset due to their own weight.

I was looking for a premixed mortar to save time and avoid DIYer errors when preparing the mortar for my walls.

AM I correct to assume that when installed on a wall the large tiles do not require a special mortar >
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Unread 09-03-2021, 11:29 AM   #14
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I think the right choice for walls for large tiles would be this type of mortar

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/cus...lb-/1000797773

Flex Bond LFT Crack Prevention Medium Bed Mortar is a premium quality,
medium bed polymer-modified mortar for use with large format tiles.

It has exceptional flexibility and bond strength for tiling difficult surfaces, such as plywood,
vinyl and laminates, and for hard-to-bond, nonporous tile, such as porcelain and glass.
Flex Bond LFT offers protection and isolation against cracks in the substrate up to 1/16".
The mortar's high polymer content makes it ideal for above-ground floor installations.

Specially formulated for use with large format tiles
Non-slumping formula eliminates lip page
Outstanding flexibility and bond strength for difficult substrate and tile applications
Protects against cracking caused by minor in-plane surface movement
Approved for industry-recommended interior and exterior applications
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Unread 09-03-2021, 01:34 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini
As far as I understand the term is interchangeable with thinset in this case.
Mini, thinset is a method of setting ceramic tiles, not a material. Thinset mortar is a material used for setting tiles using the thinset method. LHT (Large and Heavy Tile) mortars are thinset mortars. Yes, we frequently - and incorrrectly - use the terms interchangeably in the industry.

You could use the VersaBond LFT to set your large format tiles on the wall, but if your tiles are flat and your wall is flat, the regular VersaBond should be sufficient.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini
I was looking for a premixed mortar to save time and avoid DIYer errors when preparing the mortar for my walls.
There are no "premixed mortars" for setting ceramic tiles, regardless what it might say on the container. What's actually in those buckets is organic adhesive (ANSI A136.1), commonly called mastic. You do not want to use that material to set your large format tiles.

You do not need the FlexBond for any application in your project, but it won't hurt to use it.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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