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Unread 06-17-2008, 07:50 AM   #1
Igotabear
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Joint Compound to Finish Walls

Hi all,
Hope everyone is well. Haven't been here in a while. Quick question. I want to do a cheap plaster looking finish in my remodeled master bath. Can I use straight up joint compound for this?
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Unread 06-17-2008, 08:07 AM   #2
Dave Taylor
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Hi Jared.......

I believe that you can.... as long as you keep the joint compound above shower heads and (in general) out of wall areas that get wet.

You may even consider mixing a wall color paint in the compound first.
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Unread 06-17-2008, 02:22 PM   #3
ceramictec
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I have a friend that does Faux finishes. they use joint compound and either splatter it and knock it down with a flat trowel or apply it as a Venetian look, then paint it.

you can also use TintsAll to tint the joint compound: http://www.sculpt.com/catalog_98/mol...s/tintsall.htm

http://www.behr.com/behrx/expert/act...eftNav=noSteps

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Last edited by ceramictec; 06-17-2008 at 02:33 PM.
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Unread 06-17-2008, 05:12 PM   #4
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I did it in my last house ( finished basement ceiling ) put it on with a 10" taping knife, went over it with a textured paint roller, primer, paint. I would go over it with a roller, then knock it down with a flat trowel.
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Unread 06-17-2008, 05:17 PM   #5
RevBubba
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Yes Jared, the standard for us painters / drywallers is to use a slightly thinned, premixed, all-purpose joint compound for hand-applied troweled textures.

It is recommended that you use a low-rpm drill with a lot of power (like for mixing thinset) in combination with a large "double D" paddle mixer to mix. Use between a pint and a quart of clean water, pour it into your fresh 5 of mud, and mix until creamy & smooth. DON'T add more than a quart, it will become too thin and runny to hold its pattern on the wall if you overthin.

And I personally recommend getting the Sheetrock brand (USG) with the green lid. As tempting as the lightweight can be (blue lid), I don't like lightweights for texturing because they tend to have a lot more fine bubbles to work out, adding a substantial amount of labor time to the job.

Just do yourself a favor, avoid the "Westpac" brand of premixed muds. ANY other brand is going to make your job a lot more pleasant, believe me! I know from hard experience.

And finally, I suggest you not bother tinting the mud, because you'll still have to prime & paint it no matter what you do - you can't leave porous mud exposed in a bath, it won't hold up for long with typical bathroom moisture content. Tinted mud is 100% as porous as untinted mud. Just prime & paint with high-end acrylics and you'll end up with a nice bathroom.
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Unread 06-17-2008, 05:27 PM   #6
ceramictec
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there ya go Jared,

you got it right from a professional.

Thanks Bubba for the informative post.
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Unread 06-17-2008, 06:00 PM   #7
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Great post Bubba !

Somebody give that man a Klondike Bar !!

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Unread 06-18-2008, 07:21 PM   #8
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Thanks for the info guys. I had already bought two 63lb buckets of the SheetRock brand Bubba.

I'll keep you guys posted on how it goes.
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Unread 06-19-2008, 08:22 PM   #9
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Trick I came up with a few years back -
I wanted to create an easy plaster look on some walls but didn't want the sheen that painting afterwards creates. I have done a lot of plaster and stucco but just wanted an easy go of it, but still have a sanded solid look.
My solution was to mix a colored sanded tile grout with drywall mud. Worked like a beauty. Just select your color and mix the proportions you like and away you go. Spreads like mayo on a bun. Poly-modified grout gives a fairly hard and cleanable surface. We had it in a large foyer/stairway of our house for about ten years until we sold and got a lot of compliments on it. It was actually one of the selling features of the house (the tile helped a little maybe).
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Unread 06-19-2008, 08:33 PM   #10
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Well, I, for one, ain't ready to believe Bubba is no pro sheetrock finisher.

Everbody knows you add "three or four sponges full" of water to a five of mud to get the mixture right for texturing. What's this pint and quart stuff?

Do y'all even use the regular ("green lid") mud for sprayed-on texturing, Bubba? Like for orange peel or serious knock-down ("Monterey" where I live) work?
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Unread 06-19-2008, 09:38 PM   #11
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Some of the guys I work with do use a premix for spraying on orangepeel, splatter or knockdown. They tend to mix in quite a bit of water, probably because they are using a traditional hopper gun & compressor. They like to thin the premix to a consistency a bit thinner than peanut butter for this type of rig.

Personally, I own a nice Graco texture spraying rig - even though I prefer to sell the hand-applied textures. (I finally got fed up with the shoulder-cracking hand pumps and hopper guns... and I'd never go back, btw. ) When I can't sell the hand-applied textures, I tend to use a powdered texture mix for my rig. I find it is much easier to tweak the mud viscosity to achieve the desired texture effect, plus it is easier to clean out the rig at the end of the day because the powdered textures tend to fire off slower than a standard premix does. And the cost is about half, which is only an issue on the large-scale jobs.

These days there does seem to be a pretty wide variation in premix drywall mud viscosity from batch to batch - so a careful tweak of the amount of water added to each 5 can make a big difference in overall consistency on a given job, more so with sprayed-on textures but also with hand-applied textures to a somewhat lesser degree.


Oh, and:
Quote:
Everbody knows you add "three or four sponges full" of water to a five of mud to get the mixture right for texturing.
heh, this may be true - but most painters and drywall guys don't have much use for a sponge, as they don't make good rags.
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Unread 06-19-2008, 11:19 PM   #12
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You're certainly right about that. I ain't never seen a sheetrock finisher use a sponge for anything else but adding water to his mud.

Interesting about the dry mix. I've never seen anyone use anything dry except the setting compounds in very small quantities. Alla texture guys I've had do new construction for me, the ones with the big trailer-mounted pumps, still have boxes and boxes of pre-mixed stacked on the trailer or in the truck.

And ease of clean-up? How would they know anything about that there?
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Unread 06-20-2008, 06:55 AM   #13
RevBubba
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Just FYI, the powdered texture mix is most often used by those who have a texture spraying rig which is completely self-enclosed - in other words, the unit itself carries both the compressor and the hopper, and your spray gun has 2 hoses running to it (one for air, one for mud). We tend to use the powdered mix because the internal mud pump is cleaned out much faster than when a watered-down premix is used. I like the "All-Purpose Wall & Ceiling Texture" and the "Tuf-Tex" powdered mixes, both by USG.

One nice bonus to these spray rigs is they come with a "calibration float" - a little metal ball used to check the mud thickness before spraying. It allows you to make adjustments to the mud thickness before loading it into the hopper, eliminating the majority of the guesswork involved in the process. For someone that sprays texture every day, this doesn't mean much - but for the inexperienced, it can be a very valuable tool.

And if any of y'all are considering spraying on a wall/ceiling texture, do yourself a favor and get your hands on a rig like I describe above. The traditional hopper gun weighs A LOT when full of mud, making controlled spraying difficult at best...
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Unread 07-07-2008, 04:16 PM   #14
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Well I got my walls textured and painted. I decided not to go with a fancy and labor intensive trowel technique. Just one skim coat to cover the orange peel and a second finish coat. Tried to get it smooth as possible with the occasional towel marks and what not. Looks old world which is what I was going for. I'll post pics soon.

Thanks!
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