Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 02-27-2021, 07:30 AM   #1
caroleg
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 27
Cement Board/Drywall transition in shower

I don't know if that title makes sense. My question is, where the cement board ends and drywall starts, do you overlap the tile a small amount over the drywall to avoid the gap? When I did my other bathroom there wasn't any cement board, just the drywall. (And no vapor barrier) I'm sure this bathroom was the same. (using the terms drywall and green board interchangeably) I want to see if I'm right, and if so, let him know how it should have been done. Otherwise, I'm very happy with his attention to detail. Thanks, Carole
__________________
Carole
caroleg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 02-27-2021, 08:36 AM   #2
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 4,134
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
Hi Carol,

Yes, it is common to run the tile past that seam a little (or a lot, depending on the design). Remember, though, that the cement board to drywall seam still needs to be finished using alkali-resistant mesh tape and filled with thinset mortar.
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-27-2021, 11:20 AM   #3
Tool Guy - Kg
Moderator -- Wisconsin Kitchen & Bath Remodeler
 
Tool Guy - Kg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Oak Creek, WI
Posts: 22,586
Alternately, you can also run the seam several inches (or even a foot) outside the tiled area and treat this seam identically to any other drywall seam. I generally do this, then tape & paper the footprint of the tile so that I can easily tape, mud, and paint all the areas outside the tile ahead of time. I make sure to run the tape line to 1/2" inside the footprint of the tile so that I'm left with both: clean cement board to tile onto and the mud/paint seam juuuuuussssst underneath the edge of my tile. That allows for a very clean and professional transition between the two.

But when doing this, I always make sure to run the tile at least a couple inches outside the edge of my shower/tub so that I don't have drywall and paint susceptible to moisture damage.

__________________
Tonto Goldstein... but my friends call me Bubba

Help an awesome summer camp!
Tool Guy - Kg is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-27-2021, 02:11 PM   #4
nconner23
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 13
Dan - a newbie DIYer, so genuinely asking for my understanding/knowledge. But am curious - if you tape that drywall/CBU seam, do you risk cracking tile if the tile is attached to both if the dry wall were to move/swell a fair amount more than the CBU? What would happen if you DIDN'T tape that seam (assuming its outside the wet area)?
__________________
Nate
nconner23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-27-2021, 10:59 PM   #5
Kman
Moderator
 
Kman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NW Arkansas, Ozark Mountains
Posts: 11,826
Nate, taping that seam makes the two sheets more like one sheet. Not exactly like one sheet, but closer. Tile doesn't like movement, and if you have two differential materials moving at different rates, something's gotta give. The tape can help absorb some of that movement, hopefully enough that it doesn't transfer through the tile.

Short answer: your tile is more likely to crack without the tape on it.

A tip: when you tape that seam, do it at the same time you set the tile. You'll be much less likely to have a bump in the wall caused by a buildup of dry thinset mortar.
__________________
Kevin

The top ten reasons to procrastinate:

1.
Kman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-01-2021, 02:05 PM   #6
caroleg
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 27
Thank you, all.
__________________
Carole
caroleg is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-23-2021, 05:47 AM   #7
caroleg
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 27
Now chipped edges

This is the same project, so I am just attaching it to my prior post.

The grout was special order, so I had a little waiting time. Before he came I took a close look at the tiling because some of the tiles needed to be adjusted. But, every cut edge was chipped! I probably wouldn't have noticed if he would have laid them in the pattern that I wanted, but instead he decided to cut every tile to the same size for the side walls of the tub enclosure. Probably to make it easier to make the holes for the plumbing.

Anyway, why the chips? Did he do something wrong? The tile is porcelain, Lowes Ikon Glacier. PEI 4. He used a wet saw. I ended up dismissing him and will finish the remainder of the bath myself and try again to find a new tile guy.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Carole
caroleg is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-23-2021, 07:29 AM   #8
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 4,134
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
Welcome back, Carol,

There are lots of "could be's" but my first guess on the chipped cuts is that your recently dismissed tile dude was using an inferior, or simply worn out, blade on the wet saw.

Not a lot lot you can do at this point, aside from replacing them (which presents its own challenge if you don't happen to have spares laying around. Re-cutting them could possibly work, depending on the layout, but of course that would change their size.

You could dress the edges to remove some of the chips, and use a grout color that closely matches the background color of the tile to help hide the chips.
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cement board to drywall transition Achilles816 Tile Forum/Advice Board 7 08-09-2019 10:22 AM
Transition from Cement Board to Drywall George001 Tile Forum/Advice Board 6 10-16-2013 11:41 AM
Cement Board / Drywall Transition paulestuart Tile Forum/Advice Board 4 10-08-2009 09:36 PM
Cement Board/Drywall Transition Marko F Tile Forum/Advice Board 5 11-24-2003 06:16 AM
Cement Board transition to drywall Dave S. Tile Forum/Advice Board 26 06-13-2002 06:25 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:39 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC