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Unread 03-11-2020, 05:59 PM   #16
PrehistoricPool
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Antonio, funny you should mention staining the concrete, I was just starting to think about that!

This is something we had considered and discarded a while ago. My thought process went like this: initially, I really wanted travertine to match pool deck. Then I started to think it might be a bit much on the travertine, and likely wouldn't match exactly. So I started thinking about porcelain tiles. Then I started thinking about porcelain tiles that looked like concrete since those are sort of in style now, but in a color more interesting and closer to the travertine color,,,,Eureaka! I already have concrete there, I just need it to be a more interesting color! Hello staining!

That won't raise the level at all, and won't cause me any more problems with water intrusion than I have now, and as far as I know I don't have any problems with water intrusion now.

Even better, my existing concrete has deep groves dividing porch into 24 inch squares. If I grout those in combination with staining concrete, it will look just like 24 inch square tiles! Should be cheaper than tiling, definitely a lot less work! I will post a picture up as soon as I can figure out how to do that.
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Unread 03-11-2020, 06:33 PM   #17
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Here is a photo of my front porch with the grooves cut into concrete, just begging to be grouted!

Does anyone know if the acid based stains will work on 50 year old concrete? The concrete appears to have a lot of cement in it, which I understand ins a good thing for staining. It is not weathered, but I have heard old concrete is harder to stain than new concrete.

I don't want to have paint or any kind of applied coating that will just sit on the surface, really want it to sink in and bond with the concrete.
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Unread 03-11-2020, 07:43 PM   #18
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The acid stains sometimes produce their very best results on very old concrete, yielding a great deal of "character." It's sometimes difficult to judge between old concrete that will display such character when stained and old concrete that is too contaminated to take the stain well. But if you're having someone do the staining on your behalf, they should be able to tell you in general what to expect.

In most cases when I've had concrete staining done, I much preferred the look of the old concrete to the new concrete, but that's entirely a matter of aesthetic choice.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 03-15-2020, 07:39 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
You want 2% or more, which is 1/4" per foot.
So I went to Harbor Freight today and bought a six foot level. They had it on sale for $13 and of course I had a 20% off coupon for a very reasonable total of $10.40 plus sales tax. Gotta love Harbor Freight!

I was finally able to measure slope. I measured at a lot of locations on the porch and they were pretty consistent - between .23 and .28 of an inch IN SIX FEET!

So I have a 1/4 inch per six feet, or 0.35%, instead of 1/4 inch per foot, or 2%. I assume that means I shouldn't put any tile or travertine on top, no?
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Unread 03-15-2020, 08:16 PM   #20
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That means if it gets wet it won't drain very well at all, Mike. But if it gets wet, you've already got a problem, eh?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 03-15-2020, 08:47 PM   #21
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That means if it gets wet it won't drain very well at all, Mike. But if it gets wet, you've already got a problem, eh?
I guess. I've been in the house 12 years and it doesn't get wet. All but the outer 12 inches are covered by a roof, and those 12 inches are sloped more steeply. A little spray makes it's way onto the porch when it rains and the wind is blowing the right direction, but really little. And the porch as been there at least 51 years, and I don't see any evidence of water intrusion or damage.

So I am pretty comfortable with the status quo. But I am fearful of causing a problem if I raise the grade of the porch 5/8 of an inch by adding tile or travertine. To my untrained mind, it seems like that would be asking for trouble.

I am hoping the trained minds on here can confirm or deny my reservations.
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Unread 03-15-2020, 10:16 PM   #22
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I wouldn't do it.

But my preference, when building, is to have any exterior decks or patios, covered or not, at least 2" below the rough threshold of the building.

In your case where you've always had the situation you've now got and it's caused you no problems, I'd wanna leave not well enough alone.

Talk with some concrete stain contractors.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 04-01-2020, 08:45 PM   #23
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It sounds like it's not a good idea to overlay the concrete on my front porch, no matter how thin the tile is. So I guess I am going to look to color it. I really like the idea of acid stain, but am concerned that the only color choices are very dark and i would like something lighter.

I am confused about he different options for coatings. Is there anything other than acid stain that actually penetrates the concrete and reacts with it? Or is everything else just a coating that sits on top?

If I am going for coating, I want it to be really hard and durable. I hate the look of concrete paint when it eventually starts to lift and peel. One thing I am thinking about is a garage epoxy coating. That should hold up. Has anyone used that for a porch before? How did it turn out?

I think my ideal look would be like unsealed Saltillo tile. Kind of like the picture on top below. Is it realistic to hope for something close to that look with epoxy?

Home depot sells a stain pictured on the bottom which is pretty good color, but I am afraid it is just a paint that sits on top and will peel. Anyone have experience with this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/BEHR-Pre...5001/203939926
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Unread 04-01-2020, 09:58 PM   #24
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If you read the specs and instructions for that product, Mike, I think you'll see that it's a coating (acrylic) rather than a stain and they specifically caution about wear on horizontal surfaces.

If you want to try a stain, I again recommend you contact a couple (if you can find a couple) concrete stain contractors and see what they think they can do for color in your application and what they use/recommend as a top coating.

They're limited in color selections by what various acids will do to Portland cement, but some contractors are a good bit more creative than others in that, as in any other, business. Of the three I've used over the years, only one would I ever use twice. And he talked me through a DIY on a customer's green colored greenhouse floor once, too. Turned out on the high side of fair.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 04-02-2020, 12:51 PM   #25
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Thanks, CX. Any thoughts on using a garage epoxy on it? They seem to have a greater range of color possibilities, and are pretty tough as surface coatings go.
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Unread 04-02-2020, 12:53 PM   #26
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No experience with those products.
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