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Unread 01-17-2016, 12:38 PM   #1
cx
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Wall framing

The mid-height blocking when you get over 9 feet with your studs is usually a fire block requirement, Wayne, whether bearing or non-bearing walls.
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Unread 01-17-2016, 12:55 PM   #2
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Thanks CX, I see that now: R302.11.1.2 requires fireblocking "horizontally at intervals not exceeding 10 feet". That only applies to "concealed spaces of stud walls or partitions", so it wouldn't apply to an open unsheathed stud wall.

So I don't think there is any code requirement for mid height blocking or sheathing on a bearing stud wall with gravity loads only, even though as you say in plane buckling of the studs could increase deflection of joists bearing on the stud wall.

Of course, I understand that the requirements for a good tile installation exceed code minimum, so mid-height blocking or sheathing is appropriate for a bearing wall supporting tiled floors.

Cheers, Wayne
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Unread 01-17-2016, 02:50 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne
So I don't think there is any code requirement for mid height blocking or sheathing on a bearing stud wall with gravity loads only,
Look at the code section Paul posted earlier, Wayne. I brought up the fire blocking only to point out the requirement that you were questioning about the ten-foot dimension, not for any information about structural requirements.
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Unread 01-17-2016, 04:26 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX
Look at the code section Paul posted earlier, Wayne.
Right, IRC R602.4:
Quote:
R602.4 Interior load-bearing walls. Interior load-bearing walls shall be constructed, framed and fireblocked as specified for exterior walls.
Exterior walls don't actually require structural sheathing, or to my knowledge structural mid-height blocking. If you don't need wood structural panels for wall bracing to resist lateral loads, then you could sheath your exterior walls with foam sheathing or just a weather resistive barrier and siding.

So for an interior bearing wall that isn't part of the lateral force resisting system, I don't see any requirement in the IRC to sheath it.

Cheers, Wayne
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Unread 01-20-2016, 02:57 PM   #5
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Wayne.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne
Exterior walls don't actually require structural sheathing, or to my knowledge structural mid-height blocking.
Check this thread out in our Liberry. It's all about wood framing for tile floors. Lots of good info in there.

http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/...d.php?t=114739

Here's the specific article referenced above about sheathing "bearing" walls.

http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/...5&postcount=14
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Unread 01-20-2016, 03:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dana
Here's the specific article referenced above about sheathing "bearing" walls.
Hi Dana,

Thanks for that link, it is quite interesting.

I totally agree that bracing bearing walls is a good idea, particularly for tile installations. The question I was debating was whether it was a requirement in the IRC, or something extra you need to do for tile installations.

The report calls out R602.4 (build interior bearing walls like exterior walls), R602.3 (lengthy requirements for exterior walls), and Figure R602.3(2). That figure has a comment on wall bracing and refers you to R602.10, the requirements on wall bracing.

The report concludes that interior bearing wall lines needs to be braced. I think that is a jump too far, for a couple of reasons.

First, R602.10 requires a certain amount of wall bracing within a building, but none of it is required to be on the exterior walls. While bracing the exterior walls is obviously simplest, you could have a crazy design with only interior braced wall lines. So I don't think you can conclude that R602.4 is telling you interior bearing walls require bracing.

Second, even if R602.4 were to tell you that an interior bearing wall has to be a braced wall line per R602.10, the bracing required by R602.10 can be spread out through the interior bearing wall at the specified spacing. So it may be that none of it lands under the joists supporting the area to tiled.

Lastly, let me also comment that the report states that because of a slenderness ratio of greater than 50, an unbraced 8' 2x stud has no axial capacity under the NDS for wood. I don't dispute that, and so if the building were engineered, an engineer would specify some sort of lateral bracing for 100% of interior bearing walls. However, if the building is built instead under the prescriptive code for conventional wood light frame construction, that engineering calculation never comes into play. And we have just seen that the prescriptive code in the IRC does not require 100% bracing for interior bearing walls.

The upshot is that there certainly is no code requirement for 100% bracing on interior bearing walls. So a tile installer needs to check for unbraced bearing walls supporting the area to be tiled and correct them as necessary.

Cheers, Wayne
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Unread 01-20-2016, 04:21 PM   #7
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Wayne.

This, and any other discussion that doesn't go directly and concisely to someone solving their issues on their project thread, is best carried out in the Pro's Hangout, not in the Advice Forum. The Pro's Hangout is where we break down the minutia of everything we do. It's just too much for a typical DIYer.

If you'd like to start a thread over there, folks will be happy to discuss whatever it is you're curious about. Thanks.

For the present discussion, I'll respectfully disagree with you. Columns, studs in this case, that have neither of their short sides constrained, or blocked, will buckle under a much lower load due to their slenderness. See you in the Hangout.
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Unread 01-20-2016, 04:53 PM   #8
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Pulled the above posts out of a project thread in the Advice Forum, mighta lost a few posts.... oops.

Anyhow, the issue is whether interior bearing walls need to be sheathed or blocked.
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Unread 01-20-2016, 06:12 PM   #9
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Agreed Wayne. There may be no specific code requirement for continuous "bracing" of load bearing walls. But lets define "bracing" as code required lateral bracing.

I don't believe Dr. Woeste intends every interior or exterior wall be continually braced according to the lateral requirements of the code, instead that an unsheathed interior bearing wall used to support a tile floor have it's studs held in place to prevent buckling.

With the prescriptive requirements of the code for conventional light frame construction, including wall framing, sheathing, weatherproofing, interior finishing, etc..., it's probable that exterior walls will have one or both sides sheathed with something even if it's not specifically called out. Based on experience, this sheathing, whatever it is, is enough to hold the studs from buckling. Floors are designed the same way. Joist spans are based on 1 or both sides being held in place to prevent them from buckling or twisting. An option I've seen on engineered I-joist floors, is to have the bottom edge strapped with 1x or 2x either at the mid, third, or more points. This strapping is nailed to the face when no sheathing is applied to the bottom side of the joists, for instance, over a crawl space.

So, based on all this, we advise folks to either sheath, block, or otherwise constrain typical height interior load bearing walls, even if it's not expressly called out in the IRC.
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Unread 01-20-2016, 06:16 PM   #10
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And just to clarify, I agree they need to be sheathed or blocked from a tile performance point of view. I maintain that the IRC doesn't require it, so it is incumbent upon the tile installer to check for this problem.

[Edit] Our posts crossed, Dana. I agree with your last post.

Cheers, Wayne
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