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Old 10-04-2018, 07:36 PM   #16
Davy
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Philip, I think that'll work fine. You can also find those made out of marble.
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Old 10-05-2018, 11:57 AM   #17
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Peter,

Yes, a raising hinge would be ideal! I've searched a good bit and it doesn't look like anyone is making them for glass doors. I'm with you and wondering if there may be a market for something like that.


Davy,
Great! I think this is what I'll go with. Thanks for the advice.

In an unrelated note, I'm having some issues with my mud bed. It went in okay, but took a while. It's been a few days now and it has set up hard. It takes weight fine and nothing feels spongy. However, it was a bit sandy. I'm getting ready to put Redgard over it and I saw somewhere else in the forum where it was recommended to use a vacuum cleaner to remove the grit.

That worked fine, except for a bit by the transition into the bathroom. See pics. I think I have crumbled away everything that is crumbly. I'm not sure why this happened. Although it is the last area that was filled so maybe my mud was a bit dry by then... Does it look like it might turn into a larger problem or should I be able to cover this area with thinset since it is only about a quarter of an inch deep? Also was wondering if it would be a good idea to do a skimcoat of thinset over the whole mud bed to give a good surface to accept the Redgard?
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Old 10-05-2018, 06:30 PM   #18
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Yeah, skim coat the whole floor with thinset. It'll give the mud a hard crust on top. After the thinset dries, go over it lightly with a rub stone, then vacuum again.
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:24 AM   #19
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:31 PM   #20
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Unfortunately I haven't been able to spend much time on this project the last few weeks. And we ended up having to completely gut the room including all sheetrock and the ceiling. But I have made some progress and thought I'd give an update.

As of now I have hung all the cbu and green board. All the seams for the cbu have mesh embedded thinset reinforcement, and I've out a skim coat of thinset Iver the mud bed. I still have to tape the corner and ceiling joints in the drywall. I plan to apply the Redgard tomorrow. Also still need to cut our the sheetrock for the medicine cabinet. The framing is already in place. There is also blocking behind the walls for a wall mounted sink and shower bench.
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:46 PM   #21
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I think I want to use glossy black subway tile on the back shower wall (the wall without the shower head or niche), white subway tile for the rest of the walls, and black hex tile for the entire floor. Black grout for black tile, white grout for white tile.

The entire design idea for this room is to try and make it look larger than it actually is because it is a pretty small bathroom. So I'm thinking glossy black tile on that far wall would act like a mirror (see the counter top reflected in the attached picture) and reflect the white subway tile walls and make the room seem to continue. Same as a mirror would.

I'm thinking of using these tiles:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Merola-T...PSGB/206815938

But nowhere around me has any samples and I'm not sure if they will be reflective enough. Anyone have experience?

I'd also love to hear any feedback on the design in general.
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Old 12-20-2018, 06:59 AM   #22
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While I understand the goal of using the black, reflective tile, Phillip, dark colors do tend to make a space feel smaller. Not unlike painting a ceiling a darker color - has the effect of making the ceiling feel lower than it is. The gloss black is also going to show water and soap/shampoo and mineral deposit spots unless you're diligent about squeegeeing. Ditto on the floor. Just my opinion though.

What's that square opening in the floor below the sink, another drain?

Appears you're going to install a floor warming system. If so, I assume - given the curbless shower, you'll be running the heat mat into the shower?
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Old 12-20-2018, 07:41 AM   #23
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Hi Dan! Thanks for the response.

Yes, there is radiant in floor heating installed. It is embedded in SLC, but only in the bathroom floor not the shower. See post #10. This was done both for ease of installation and cost reasons. Also, I figured with the hot water the shower floor should get warm enough.

Yes, that is a drain under the sink. The whole room will be tanked to at least 10 or 12 inches up the wall, and the threshold will be the highest spot. So if one of my wife's hairballs manages to clog the shower drain, any overflow should leave through the floor drain under the sink before it floods out of the bathroom. Also will be nice for potential toilet overflows.
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Old 12-20-2018, 08:05 AM   #24
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As for the black tile...

I've seen lots of folks thinking along the same lines as you, Dan. They say that black will make a small space look smaller. Then I've seen people that say when used correctly, it can open up a smaller space. But I'm not quite sure what "correctly" means. Or perhaps those folks are just off their rockers???

Regardless, I have already purchased the black hex tile for the floor. It's matte not glossy (for slip resistance). And I will be using a dark grout similar to the fist picture.

Although I will not be using the same dark grout for the walls. I think it would break up the space too much with the small subway tile. I'm thinking off an off white, or very light grey instead.
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Old 12-20-2018, 08:19 AM   #25
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As of now, I haven't purchased any of the wall tile yet, so black for that one shower wall isn't set in stone. I am concerned about making the space feel small, but there are a couple of other considerations I'm trying to keep in mind.

Firstly, the floor is going to be black. So I feel like I need to incorporate black somewhere else in the design... Not really into black fixtures, and I can't find any black tile trim I like enough to commit myself too. Right now the plan is just to have a few black accessories. Hand towels, picture frame/artwork, and maybe black soap?

Secondly, that shower wall is directly opposite the wall with the window, and this is also the longest sight line in the room. It's basically a skinny rectangle. Since you enter against the window, I feel like having something to draw your attention towards the far right wall would help make the room seem larger. I'm just not sure what would work best.
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:20 AM   #26
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Right. I didn't read the whole thread this time, but do now remember from my first read through about the hair....um, challenge.

Just need to remember to top off that other drain with water from time to time.

I do understand the desire to tie something in with the black floor, and the accessories can certainly help with that. I'm also all for a bold contrast statement but, in the case of shower tile, ease of maintenance overrides pretty much every other consideration for me. I even considered not installing a niche, as it's one more place for gunk to collect.

Totally agree with using a lighter grout with the white subway's; have never been a fan of the dark grout look. I have seen them done with a light gray - think it looks great.
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:43 AM   #27
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Thanks Dan!

We've decided to go with plain white subway tile for all of the walls. You're right, it's just not gonna be worth it to keep clean. I think we may do some sort of black and white wallpaper instead. And that way we can change it fairly easily if we don't like it.

I've finally finished with the Redgard. Everything was primed first with a dilute water mix. Then I applied Redgard using the sqrft coverage on the bucket as a guide. Precoated the corners with a brush, and used a roller on the rest. Towards the end of the the bucket, I applied an entire coat with a brush so I could work it into the pinholes in the CBU, and also added some fiberglass tape to the floor and drain joints.

All total I think I have two coats on the bathroom walls, three coats on the showers walls, and four coats for the floor and pan.

It's passed a flood test and I'm about to start installing floor tile.
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:49 AM   #28
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I also, thought I'd take a minute a post some photos of what this bathroom looked like before we started in on it.

So yeah, as the photos show it was pretty bad... I really don't know what was going on in the person's head who installed this...
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:08 AM   #29
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And then once we started tearing out the shower we realized it was worse than we thought.

All of the tile was applied using mastic. The backboard was 1/4" Hardie Board used throughout with no waterproofing of any kind. And that Hardie Board was attached using g drywall screws.

They used mesh tape, but without any thinset, or Redgard, or anything. All of the seams and joints we're terrible, and I even found one stuffed with some sort of plastic crap to fill up the gap.

There were screws through the pan liner all the way down into the pan. And speaking of the pan, I still don't know what it was. Some sort of concrete I'm not familiar with, a layer of tile set with mastic, and then another layer of the same tile set with thinset. WTF???

Anyway... Glad to have it all ripped out and happy to be nearing the finish line of having a new bathroom!
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Old 01-11-2019, 11:16 AM   #30
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