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Old 05-09-2019, 06:20 AM   #31
ss3964spd
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Durock will also make you a custom sized foam tray. But any pre-made tray/receptor will require that the floor be flat and level.
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:51 PM   #32
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Thanks for the replies everyone.

By way of an update, I'm now well on my way to completing the demolition component of my project. Basically all the walls / tiles have been removed, shower tray has been removed... now the fun part is dealing with the damp wood and mould.

I tested the wood and it's on the high-end of the moisture range on the exterior sheathing as well as shower plywood base, especially around the edges where I removed the curb today which was obviously heavily water damaged.

I'm attaching some pictures and have a few general questions for anyone who can assist:

1. If you look at my shots of the exterior sheathing plywood, once I removed the insulation, it's evident that there are numerous screws coming in from the outside. The screws appear to be rusty and it looks to me like the area around the screw, wherever I seem to see a screw is a bit wet or at least has some wet stains. I tested the moisture and generally speaking, it's too high in those areas. My question for the group is, would this be typical construction and nothing to be concerned with? OR is the fact that screws have penetrated my exterior wall a problem?

2. From my other photos, you can see that I took a meter reading right near the edge of the bathroom tiles and where the old shower curb was. The area there is somewhat damp, but the actual plywood in the middle of the pan is generally fairly dry. I'm trying to figure out if I need to remove the bathroom floor tiles to see if any water penetrated there? Or if I let this exposed area dry off, will that be enough? I'm trying to avoid a full blown demolition especially given the floor tiles are in fine shape and they have a build-in heating system and I'd rather not venture to destroy all that.

Any thoughts / comments are much appreciated in advance!!

Thank you,
John
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Old 05-12-2019, 05:10 AM   #33
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As for the screws, John, what's the exterior of the house clad with? Regardless, not uncommon for the builder to miss their mark - the studs in this case. As for the rust, I'd guess that's due to moisture from inside the house. Even when the walls were covered moisture can still migrate through the wall and collect on the back of the sheathing, more so when humidity levels are relatively high in the house.

Given the curb was in such rotten shape I'd also be concerned with how much moisture may have migrated from the curb to under the main floor tile. At this point I'd probably take a wait-and-see approach, and reassess once the readings drop down to an acceptable range. If you have access to the bottom of the floor from below (basement, crawl space, etc) you can have a look there, too.
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:37 PM   #34
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Guys, to the original question on a sloping shower curb, I understand the logic of having the membrane on the curb slope (i.e. make sure the curb is sloped and therefore the membrane is also sloped). But if I'm going to top the curb with a solid piece of granite, on top of which my glass panel is going to be placed, does the granite also really need to be sloped?

Ideally I would think it should be sloped, but the reality is nothing should get through a solid piece of granite and even if it does, the underlying waterproofing is sloped.

Reason I'm hesitant about sloping the top granite piece, the glass panel will then sit on a slope, which feels like a funky way to install a 50lb glass panel which already won't be drilled and therefore somewhat not as secure as a drilled panel. So essentially, you're putting a heavy piece of glass on a slope? Won't it over time slide off... gravity?
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:18 PM   #35
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John, I moved your question here to prevent confusion on the other member's project thread.

The slight amount of slope across the width of a shower curb isn't enough to interfere with the installation of a glass door or panel. The requirement is still only a minimum of 1/4" per horizontal foot, which usually amounts to only about 1/8th" or less on most curbs.

If you don't put some slope there you'll find you have water collecting and remaining against your glass after the shower use, which can, and frequently does, result in a mold problem in that area.

My opinion, worth price charged.
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:51 PM   #36
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Yep, you'll be stuck drying that area off after every use, but even that won't be enough. Because eventually water will get under the glass or the track and just sit there.
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Old 05-12-2019, 05:59 PM   #37
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Your shower curb is L shaped. The slab on top will need to be cut in two pieces and mitered to get slope.
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:37 PM   #38
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Mud pan

Hi guys,

I have a couple of quick questions on mud pans, hopefully you can point me in the right direction if this has already been discussed:

1. What brand or specific product would you recommend which is pre-mixed with the appropriate ratio of sand / cement, so that only additional water is required? Ideally something from home depot, lowes, etc.

2. What should be the minimum height of my mud floor? Kerdi seems to say 1 inch at the drain, but is that sufficient? I will have an additional 0.75 inches to my longest point so the sides will obviously be thicker. I will only be doing 1 mud floor, with kerdi membrane on top of that, so something to note.

3. How many bags do I need of the product? Is there a rule of thumb?

Thanks everyone!
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Old 05-20-2019, 01:09 PM   #39
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1. I know of none. If you'll go to the Shower Construction thread in our Liberry you'll find information there on what bagged products to purchase at your home center and mix to make deck mud. Lot of other useful information there, too.

2. Over your wood subfloor, if it is sufficient, one inch of mud at the drain may be adequate. You must, of course, have a cleavage membrane and expanded metal lath over your plywood subfloor.

3. Pure math, John. Length times width times height for the volume of your mud floor. I find it simplest to calculate the portion using the thickness at the drain first, then add half the calculation of the volume of the height above the drain area. Buy more than you think you'll use, the materials are cheap. There is also a calculator in that Liberry thread I mentioned if you want to use that.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 05-20-2019, 06:41 PM   #40
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The Floor and Décor stores in my area have Mapei's 4 to 1 deck mud. It's a little harder to work with than if you made your own 5 to 1 but it will work.
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:29 PM   #41
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Thanks guys, I will create my own mix, 5:1 ratio, seems to be the go to ratio around these parts.

Also, I just finished the insulation in the bathroom and have a bunch of leftover vapour barrier poly. Can I just use that on the plywood and then wire on top, then the mortar bed?
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:34 PM   #42
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You want polyethylene that is at least 4 mils thick, John, that's all that's required.
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:53 PM   #43
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I've had pretty good luck with using the 60 pound bags of Quikrete sand topping mix and one 50 pound bag of sand.

Two points on that mixture: it ends up being a little heavy on the sand, by ten pounds, so you can hold back that much if you want. Second, if mixing in a bucket, I find it easier to cut the recipe in half. So half a bag of sand topping mix and a little less than half a bag of sand (twenty pounds to be exact).

Mix it up dry first, then add water. Keep in mind that you can always add more water, but you can't remove it once added.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:58 AM   #44
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Thanks guys, will do.

Another question on the glass panel install... I will ensure nothing goes through the curb, however, is it okay to drill through the wall at the top of the panel? That's where the frame would need to connect. Presumably, that will pierce my Kerdi board, but I don't see how you avoid it. It's also very high, so chances are extremely slim that any water would ever go up there.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:10 AM   #45
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Yes, but fill the hole with sealant before driving the screws.
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