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Unread 08-15-2014, 03:49 AM   #16
jondon
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Quote:
posted by pooky:
Hell, I've been at this 25+ years and still think it would be nice to work
for a couple of very high-end tile-contractor friends of mine. No fussy customers, no shagging materials, no marketing, no call backs, no sales,
etc. etc. -- and not to be an ass, but not having employees and subs
would be a nice thing at times.

Brendan, what is mentioned above is what you need to consider. Those of us who have been on our own for a long time all know about this. You will only learn once you have been on your own a long time. I agree to just have to show up and work would sometimes be nice vs picking up supplies, spacers, materials, answering emails in the morning, etc.

I tell my helper until you go our on your own you don't know what it takes for me sometimes to get to the job in the morning. Some of us thrive in that environment, we want that responsibility. Personally I enjoy meeting with customers and going over everything, sending the estimate, so on so forth.

You have to have good people skills. I would agree too as for the skill you are really has no correlation to the number of years you have been doing something though it does give you experience yes. Experience to know whether you want to run the show or work for someone else and not have those hassles.

For me personally before I got into tile I had a boss who cared about one thing himself and making everyone else look bad. So what I craved when I started doing tile is to not be in that situation ever again. You say you have a good boss, I would work with him to keep that a good relationship and a good friendship it sounds to me like a lot of good can come out of this for you and him
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Unread 08-15-2014, 04:43 AM   #17
tilemanct
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Have you considered partnering up with your boss? Is it worth looking into? How many years does he have left in the trade? Does he still have time to grow or is he looking to get out? You have youth and energy. He has skill and has been through the wars. It might be an option to explore.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 05:30 AM   #18
Swedes Tile
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I guess he graduated high school at 15 to be able to get his 5 years of experience at 21 years of age.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 08:04 AM   #19
tilejoe
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I'm not going to knock anyone's ambition to start a business. We all have made mistakes.
I was given great advice when I did it
1- low price does not make you competitive. If you don't make enough, you won't be in business long.
2- always do work to the best of your ability. Ability will get better over time.

I would love to share the burden of estimating, billing, collecting, book keeping, ordering, designing, etc.. Teams are wonderful.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 08:12 AM   #20
MNTileGuy
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I can't disagree with what's all been said here. There's many days I wish I didn't have to deal with the business end-meeting with clients, estimates, etc... I work alone and like it that way. You'll never get rich with my business model, but I just don't want the additional headache of dealing with employees.

Like some have said, depending on his age, partnering with your boss may be an option to explore. I sure wish I had more guidance learning the business end of this, but it seems like the school of hard knocks is where most of us learn that.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 01:05 PM   #21
wessendorf15
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no i did not graduate from school at 15 i just worked overnights while in school. and thank you all for the replys sounds like everyone knows what they are talking about. and yeah the guy wants to get out of tile. but keeps saying he is to picky to let someone else lay the tile or do the work. and that is my issue. ive been getting calls and and just dont want to hurt that work relationship. cause it is a steady job doesnt pay the best but hey its steady. im just worried that if i do go out and do these couple jobs will i have anymore after that or would i desperate.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 01:06 PM   #22
wessendorf15
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i love going out and doing estimates talking to customers ect. thats not the issue. im just wondering should i take the risk or not
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Unread 08-15-2014, 01:59 PM   #23
cx
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Nobody out here can help you with that, Brendan. If you're not ready to make that decision for yourself, you're not ready to be doing business on your own. When you are, you probably will be.

Pretty simple, non?
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Unread 08-15-2014, 02:06 PM   #24
tilejoe
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There is definitely something "dumb" about starting your own business. I feel that 21 was a good time to jump in for me. In other words, I'm not sure I'd do it now, at 35.

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Unread 08-15-2014, 03:00 PM   #25
Dave Gobis
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Is there anyone (setters) over 50 that doesn't wish they had a way out? I made good money when I was in but it comes with a price tag itself. From my perspective, if you love it you can make it work. If you just want a job, keep the one you got.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 05:22 PM   #26
koihito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erik
I guess he graduated high school at 15 to be able to get his 5 years of experience at 21 years of age.
I don't know Erik, when I was still in School I started working nearly full time. I tried glass blowing, making ice cream, a dairy farm, air brushing and horse training among other things. My 12 year old has worked with me the last three summers and he is a legitimate helper, in fact another setter asked to borrow him next week. The idea the a 21 year old, because he is young, automatically has no skills is a false premise. You don't know how good or bad his work is or how much experience he really has.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 06:09 PM   #27
wessendorf15
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Quote:
I guess he graduated high school at 15 to be able to get his 5 years of experience at 21 years of age.
like i said i was in highschool and started working overnights for the guy while he was in new construction. scraping floors and and other stuff for install.
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Unread 08-16-2014, 09:14 AM   #28
jcsa
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Brendan,
If you choose to do your own thing be prepared for a lot of work. The work i am talking about is not only the tilesetting, but the business end of running a business. I am going to suggest two books to read before you make the plunge. The first is The E-Myth Contractor and the E-Myth. The author is Michael Gerber. They explain the Entrepreneurial Path you will take. Like Gobis says, you have to have passion and love what you do to be successful. I love what i do and frankly i don't know what i would be doing if i had a choice. I wish the pay was equal to the sacrifices i have endured, but here i am working Saturday. Part out of necessity and part because i want to be. These are the sacrifices it takes to run a successful business. Setting tile is only a part of a business. The other requires knowledge and the ability to learn or pay someone to do those things. There are some very good craftsman and poor business men, they generally don't last long...or keep bouncing on the bottom. Prepare for being complete or as much as possible before you make the next step. Please read those books. They ill help you with your decision making. Good Luck John Cox
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Unread 08-16-2014, 10:11 AM   #29
Tiger Mountain Tile Inc
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If you're not willing to take the risk then it's probably not for you. But taking the leap doesn't guarantee success. You have to learn a lot of lessons the hard way- no matter how prepared that you try to be.

It's not easy to be self-employed. It's even harder to do well at it.
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Unread 08-17-2014, 09:56 AM   #30
Jim Cordes
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I was a helper at 17 full time and started sub-contracting at 19. yea it was pretty tough learning basic things the hard way but something about when your on your own and your survival depends on it that makes you learn very quickly..lol

Also when you are young the customers can be very critical. so you better learn good people skills. And be able to back up your work..basically you will have to work that much better and that much harder then an older guy.

Don't see why your boss would want you as a partner..why split the money?

I might recommend that if your worried about job security you might want to start out working for a shop as a sub. to get your feet wet. Many shops generally want guys like you...Young, not real skilled but they don't spend as much money either...pretty much if you are good enough to finish the job and collect the check from the customer they are happy. Older experienced guys can demand too much for them to pay and still make a profit.
Find a place that won't have a problem with working around your schedule. that way you can focus on your own jobs...eventually that is the goal. The shop is a back-up.

If this is the only trade you have ever done. then seems like you have a passion for it already. The fact that your on this site shows that you are willing to put in the extra time.

It can be scary going off on your own, but your only going to make so much working for your boss. If you desire to advance your gonna have to take that first step.

With the internet and technology these days you have it pretty easy, much easier then most of us did, you have instant resources via photos,forums,smart phones etc..to get information when you need it as experience new and unknown situations. Use those resources and continue to learn.
You don't have to have experience on every possible job situation..most of us still don't..You just have to be prepared to handle one job at a time...and over time that gives you experience.

Start small

If you don't know ..ask
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Last edited by Jim Cordes; 08-17-2014 at 10:05 AM.
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