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Unread 07-31-2014, 01:55 PM   #16
NikNak0919
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Wet set v Cured Mud Bed

Hey there!

This question is for my own edification! I've been reading up, and learned that for large format tiles everyone says you need a very, very flat surface.

Now, some people say setting the tile in a wet mud bed ("wet setting") is the best way to go to get it very flat. However, some people advise against wet setting, and instead say screeding the mud bed and letting it dry over night is better ("Cured mud bed").

What are the pros and cons of each? Why do so many people have issues with wet setting?
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Unread 07-31-2014, 03:03 PM   #17
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I personally have trouble finding people who can "wet set" in a large commercial setting. I used to wet set my shower floors all the time but now with the liquid applied waterproofing for shower pans it's just a different dog.
We usually have to have the guy put in a mud bed and set the tile the next day. They have some nice thin sets for Large format tiles that make it easier to install the floor on top of a semi cured or cured bed or substrate of your choosing.
The larger the tile the flatter the substrate needs to be. But all walls and floors should be flat.

When it comes to success in the tile biz, substrate flatness is everything.
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Unread 07-31-2014, 03:47 PM   #18
NikNak0919
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Wet setting/Mud Setting seems kind of straight forward (forgive me if I'm wrong).

1. Spread thinset onto prepared substrate
2. Trowel dry pack over thinset
3. Tamp dry pack with trowel to get it compact
4. Butter tile with thinset
5. Drop tile onto dry pack
6. Tap with rubber mallet to get level/check for level

While it does sound labor intensive, it doesn't seem too hard. Am I wrong?
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Unread 07-31-2014, 04:51 PM   #19
Davy
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That's about the size of it. Wet set is nice when the stone you are setting are all different thicknesses. I have done it both ways but I can mud the floor one day and set it the next day faster than setting it in wet mud. Plus, it allows me to pop lines on my mud to help keep everything straight. But, that's just me.
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Unread 07-31-2014, 09:00 PM   #20
NikNak0919
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What shoul I do about this sheet metal attached to my concrete slab?

Finally, getting to this project! Well, at least getting to the living room/dining room. I started off by demoing the tile. I think I mentioned this already, but the previous owners put tile on top of tile in the dining room, which is connected to the living room. It looked extremely unlevel. Thankfully, it all came up pretty easy, but I think that's b/c it was tiled on some strange substrate (at least strange to me).

As I was lifting up the old tile, at the entryway to the living room, I saw an extremely flexible piece of sheet metal. It appears to be under the thinset, but hubby thinks it might be under the concrete slab itself. Anyone ever seen this? What should I do about it?
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Unread 07-31-2014, 09:22 PM   #21
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Hi Nichole,

I'd get the hammer, broom and dustpan out and do some modern archeological digging to figure out what you have and what it's attached too. The hammer will knock off any remaining stubborn bits and the dustpan and broom are to clean up that debris so you can at least see the floor while your working.
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Unread 07-31-2014, 09:26 PM   #22
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It's not rocket science, but I sure as hell wouldn't call it easy!
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Unread 08-01-2014, 07:11 AM   #23
Jim Cordes
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It depends on the tile/stone. I prefer wet set when working with uneven tiles such as large slate. Also is some cases outside where the slab is pretty bad.
But inside when doing large format (particularly flat tiles)I prefer setting over a dry bed everytime.

Ive done some wetset before on commercial jobs where there would be a hole or what not and there just was not time fix it the other way and wait the another day. Comes in handy for that since commercial can be time constraining.
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Unread 08-01-2014, 04:40 PM   #24
NikNak0919
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How soon can I walk on the mud bed?

So, I'm about to attempt this mud bed in the living room. The thing is the living room is how we get in and out of the house. Will we be confined to our bedroom for the whole night if we put the mud bed down, or can we just lay some cardboard down and walk over it?
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Unread 08-02-2014, 09:38 PM   #25
MNTileGuy
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Just don't try to pull a tile back up out of the wet bed. I tried that on a better bench once. Didn't work out so well.

That said, I'm a "next day" guy.
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Unread 08-03-2014, 07:43 PM   #26
Davy
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Brad, I remember when I was in High School helping my dad on a weekend. He had just mudded and set a shower floor and he sent me in there to grout it. I was spreading away and reversed the direction of the float and the suction of the float pulled up 3 tiles. He wasn't happy.
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Unread 12-07-2014, 01:53 AM   #27
NikNak0919
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Sand under water

OK, don't laugh, but I bought the sand to prepare the deck mud, like, 2 months ago, but had been too busy to get around to laying down the deck mud. I put the sand into barrels and covered it w/ tarp. Today, I finally am set to spread the mud, and I remove the tarp to find like 3 inches of water covering the sand.

How do I dry the sand? And this water has made these barrels exponentially heavier.
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Unread 12-07-2014, 06:42 AM   #28
jcsa
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Sand

You will not need to add water to your mix. The sand may already have enough water trapped to make your proper mix. Very definitely get rid of the standing water. If you spread your sand out, it will dry some if you think it is too wet. The air will dry it out. You might want to spread a tarp out and put the sand on it to dry. As far as moving it good luck.
Unless you have a forklift or spinach, the bucket method or wheelbarrow are going to be your friend. Good Luck J.C.
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Unread 12-07-2014, 08:33 AM   #29
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We've all had this happen. Like John said, spread it out. If you have a driveway, sweep it clean and spread out the sand. If it's too wet, the portland won't want to mix into the sand very well.
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Unread 12-07-2014, 03:39 PM   #30
NikNak0919
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Thanks guys! So, just get a bucket, scoop out the sand into the wheelbarrow, let it dry a little, then mix the portland into it?
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