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Unread 10-22-2010, 05:32 PM   #1
mjptwo
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hump in floor

I've learned alot of things on this board in the last couple years, but I'm a bit stumped on my current problem. I have a concrete slab on my 10 x 20 breezeway floor (unheated room between garage and house, slab on grade) There use to be Asbestos tile on this floor, which has been removed, but there is still a bit of cutback left on the floor that I cant seem to get up. My problem is I would like to lay tile over this floor, but it is severely out of level. The middle of the room is the high spot(the hump), with the floor sloping 1 1/2" towards the front entrance and 1 1/2' towards the back entrance. I was planning on a slc to level out the floor, which i know would be very expensive, but I'm really worried about it bonding to the cutback. Just wondering if anyone has any better ideas for getting the low spots closer to level. For instance, could I use some type of mud that would bond to the the cutback to bring the floor up say an inch, then use slc over that? And just to be clear, I have scraped up the majority of cutback, but theres still a 60 s.f. section in the area of the hump that is still black. Not sure why, but the old cutback seemed to bond much better in the high area than in the low areas.
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Unread 10-22-2010, 06:02 PM   #2
scuttlebuttrp
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First; you may want to ask a moderator to change the title of this thread. This is a family website.

If you have the clearance though, you should install a mudbed on that floor to straighten it out.
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Unread 10-22-2010, 06:09 PM   #3
Davy
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I would mud the whole floor out with dry pack, bonding the new mud to the slab with modified thinset. The mud would need to be about 3/4 at the hump and get deeper each way.

Here is a patio that we leveled it up because they wanted to enclose it for a sunroom. We tiled it after they got it enclosed.
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Unread 10-22-2010, 07:29 PM   #4
mjptwo
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Thanks for the response guys. I think thats exactly what I'm looking for . I dont have an issue with clearance being that the floor is a step down from the doorways. But know I'm wondering if this is a diy project. I get the idea from Davys picture what is needed, but being that I'm not really sure what drypack is, I wonder if I'm getting in over my head. I'm assuming its a portland cement/sand mix, but i never relized it was put over modified thinset. In my head i was envisioning some type of metal lath fastened to the floor with a sand topping mix screeded over it. Over the years everytime i tried to search about mud floors I always seemed to get articles about shower floors and nothing else. I guess i should spend some more time reading more threads about mud. Let me know if you have any links where I could get some more info. And I just checked out Davys website, and that is some beautiful tilework, and his granddaughter could be my daughters twin.
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Unread 10-22-2010, 08:13 PM   #5
silvercitytile
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yeah mike what dave is proprosing isnt a diy project. although it could be with the right guidance.
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Unread 10-23-2010, 05:51 AM   #6
Davy
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Mike, thanks for the kind words. Yeah, there are different ways and methods to use dry pack. Sometimes we will use lath and felt paper over a slab and let the dry pack float instead of bonding it. For that we like to have it thicker, at least 1 1/2 inches. When bonding it, you can do away with the lath and go thinner with the mud. If there are any cracks in the slab, you can add a membrane over the mud in case there is movement. On this patio, there wasn't any slab cracks so we didn't add a membrane and the slab is 30-40 years old.
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