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Old 07-15-2018, 07:12 PM   #91
retiler
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The precast prices that I saw were very very impressive.
I would definitely have went with precast if it were a realistic option.
For us, precast would have meant tearing up our porch and excavating our garage.
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Old 07-15-2018, 07:19 PM   #92
retiler
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Going the bidding route would probably make a great deal of sense.
We certainly had thought of this, though we did not think that the prices were far off. It would be best to have a reality check.
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:15 PM   #93
jadnashua
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A contract is an agreement between two parties...they offer, if you accept, as long as the terms of the contract are met, I don't think you'd have any grounds for fraud or anything else. Just like you might get a car at one dealership with a much better discount than another, and some, on a really popular car might offer it at above the suggested retail price on the sticker...if you're willing to pay it, there's nothing 'wrong' with it. Buyer beware is true for most any transaction.
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:32 PM   #94
retiler
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This is great!

I am already receiving replies to my request for bids!
I am very interested in knowing what the true price of this should be.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:01 PM   #95
jadnashua
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Sometimes, it's tough getting apples to apples comparisons, which can affect the delivered price. Quality, style, and level of workmanship can vary. So, check warranties and materials specifications carefully along with the rep of the people involved. Timing can be an issue, too...sometimes, if you can wait, the price can vary as can being flexible when it it is to be done.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:41 PM   #96
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I still think tile could work out well for you. I would instead go for a rougher textured porcelain tile and a good exterior mortar. Just make sure there's no spot bonding and blobs of thinset, and tiles get 100% coverage into the mortar, and you should be good to go.

For waterproofing, that's an entirely different ballgame. The generally accepted rule of tiling is tile isn't waterproof, grout isn't waterproof, and thinset isn't waterproof. Also, what you may have even going on isn't even thinset on those tiles, but mastic, which is an organic glue meant only for interior decorative tile work (kitchen backsplashes). It's simply used as it's easy, you just get a big bucket of it already premixed. Or it could even have been premixed thinset, which basically doesn't dry well often (since it has to stay wet inside of a container) and has the same problems of mastic, of losing bond/washing away when too much water is on it. Even the cheapest real thinset won't wash away, as it's just cement and sand.

To make the area waterproof, you need waterproofing on top of your concrete before tiles/anything goes there. Basically the modern waterproofers for tile are a liquid rubber type of paint you paint onto the concrete, though in older times, tar paper, hot roofing tar, etc, was used to make things waterproof. Also, though this likely isn't a good option, there are waterproof/resistant paints made for masonry like Drylok, which can supposedly be applied from inside and work. But it's still better for any masonry you need waterproofed to apply waterproofing on top rather than let the whole structure get saturated with water and have a relatively thin layer of paint hold all the pressure.

Yes, tile will give some amount of water resistance to some point, but even on a glazed shiny tile, you still have grout joints to deal with, and any voids behind the tile where water can collect (especially with spot bonding blobs, there can be 1cm or so areas under the tile where water can collect...)

In your situation what I would personally do is pay someone to just demolish all the existing slate tiles, then install a rougher finished porcelain tile there. If you DIY it, the steps would be demolish, smooth out the concrete enough so tile can be reapplied (with some sort of patching compound rated for exterior use...), paint it with a thick layer of liquid waterproofing, and recaulk any expansion joints (it's likely those are leaking, too...) then tile and grout finally. You'd have to use a mortar and grout suitable for freeze/thaw application. Every manufacturer makes them. They also do make polymer additives to either make your own thinset (Mapei makes one called Keracrete, Laticrete makes another called... I forget...) or add to their thinsets to strengthen them. Then modified thinsets exist, too. Really there's a lot of options. But at the end of the day, most thinsets are 1:1 Portland cement and sand (grout is usually 1:2 with more sand...) and what determines the price difference mostly is how modified they are (polymer additives to allow them to flex), and the amount of actual cement. Again, there's a lot of options, but you need ones rated for freeze/thaw cycles.

Some videos to watch are actually Custom Building Products videos, they're actually quite informative, especially for a DIYer (like myself.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nuz4VOfjwQ
Exterior tile tips

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV-78t_nPdI
Their brand of liquid waterproofer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Way5bMh-eYg
If you ignore any other video, watch this one.
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