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Unread 10-13-2021, 10:38 PM   #31
jadnashua
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FWIW, flexible and tile don't go together...

Most SLC also require a primer, but one that can be applied thin, tapered to zero, and doesn't need lath is Ardex Liquid Backerboard.

A first timer can install SLC well, but you really need to understand what you're dealing with, and, since you don't have much time before it starts to setup, you will want some help and to stage things so you can mix, pour, and work the material non-stop until it's 'done'. Even the 'extended' set time stuff becomes unworkable in about 30-minutes from when you add the water to it. Throw in the mixing time, and if you don't have someone mixing the next batch, the first stuff will be setting before you're ready to finish up. Ever walked on a partially frozen puddle? You can't get it flat again...
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Unread 10-14-2021, 08:24 AM   #32
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Self leveling

Uh oh--looks like Henry and Ardex call for at least 3/4" in the case of wood substrate. Mine is 1/2" plywood with 3/4" planks beneath. Anyone know if that minimum is cumulative?
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Unread 10-14-2021, 08:43 AM   #33
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Depending upon the joist structure and proper installation, that subfloor would satisfy any manufacturer of tile installation substrates of which I'm aware, presuming joist spacing of no more than 16" on center. Should satisfy Henry's requirements.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-14-2021, 11:32 AM   #34
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Flatten with cementitious patch?

I apologize if I’m over-posting—I just really appreciate all of your wisdom and expertise!

Is there an obvious disadvantage to using cementitious patch instead of SLC to flatten the majority of a 5.5x9’ bathroom floor? The Planipatch instructions say to use SLC instead for “large areas,” but they don’t define “large.” I wouldn’t need to go over the maximum thickness of 1/2,” and would be closer to 1/4” for most, if not all, of the low area.
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Unread 10-14-2021, 12:12 PM   #35
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No such thing as over-posting, Laura. If you have questions, axe'em.

Laura, you can do it any way you want. Most of the SLCs require the use of a metal or proprietary plastic mesh with their product over a wood framed floor and have a minimum thickness requirement. There's a reason for that.

Use of some of the cementitious patching materials over wood framed floors may also have some extra requirements, but that's up to the manufacturer. I've used several of them over concrete slabs and found them useful, but never over wood subfloors. And, truth be known, I'd be a bit worried about the areas where you trowel them to zero to match the subfloor level. Can't say that's a real concern as I've never tried it. Might work just fine.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-14-2021, 06:16 PM   #36
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Search the specs on the available products.

Note, some of them give you the option to mix with just plain water, and some of them allow mixing with an additive. I've only used SLC once, and did a thick pour to cover pex radiant floor tubing. But, I mixed it outside of the room on some bare plywood. I mixed it with their additive. There were some drips that got onto the floor (Advantec OSB) that didn't get immediately cleaned up. Long after they'd cured, I tried to scrap them off...didn't work. Hit them with a hammer, didn't work. Tried a chisel, didn't work. I ended up grinding them off. These spots were probably less than 1/16" thick. That was with Ardex K-15. That product can't be run to a feathered edge on a wooden subfloor, but a few can. NOte, that the K-15 also requires application of a primer, and where I was trying to clean it up, there was none, so if there had been, it may very well have been an even more tenacious bond.

SLC is not inexpensive. Dealing with your subfloor is often the better choice both financially, and time wise.

No guarantees, but I might try sanding the planks flat, then, depending on how thin they ended up, consider using a thicker ply on top, installed as if they weren't there as there may not be enough left in places to hold the screws of the second layer. Or, live with a thicker layer of SLC. Many call for at least 1/2" above the highest point...if you've got some lath in there, that very well could be 3/4" to give a little margin for error. Not all do.

Many SLC start to set and become unworkable in 15-minutes...the extended setting ones might give you 30-minutes, but high temperatures can speed that up. Not as much of an issue in the wintertime, but can be a big deal in the summer.
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Unread 11-21-2021, 08:17 PM   #37
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Tile to hardwood transition

Hello again! Thanks for all of your help so far! I’m getting to the end of my floor (pics later), and I realize that I don’t know how to end it. Should I tile up to 1/8” from the hardwood (past the ditra), then cover the gap with something?
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Unread 11-21-2021, 10:16 PM   #38
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You do want a gap between the tile and the hardwood, but what you cover it with is up to you.

Is there a height difference between the tile and the hardwood? That will make a difference in the options for the transition.

You could make a hardwood ramp with a rabbit joint over the tile. Schluter has a huge amount of different profiles. If the floor sections are essentially the same height, you could just fill it with a caulk, if not maybe a profile with a moveable ramp, or say a quarter-round, or use a profile like this which comes in various heights and colors when they match:
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Unread 11-23-2021, 08:35 AM   #39
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Thanks, Jim! The tile is about 1/4” higher than the hardwood. I’ll look into these!
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Unread 11-29-2021, 02:02 PM   #40
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CBU to drywall juncture

Here’s my floor! It’s not perfect, but for my first time, I don’t feel too bad about it.

Now on to the shower…is there any reason that I’d need to tape and mud the juncture where shower’s CBU meets the drywall on the back wall? I plan to tile right up to it, or as close as possible, then end with a schluter piece or bullnose.

And, aside from knowing where the studs are, is there anything else I need to think ahead for in terms of installing a glass door into that CBU? Do I just tile it as usual then still through the tile later? Thanks, y’all!
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Unread 12-03-2021, 08:17 AM   #41
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Laura,

IMO, yes, you should tape and mud that seam using an alkali resistant mesh tape and mortar. I don't think you'll be able to end the tile, and whatever trim you might use, so that both are on the cement board only and still be able to hide the seam with caulk. If any of the tile overlaps the seam, and you don't tape and mud it, you run the risk of cracks.
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Unread 12-23-2021, 10:09 AM   #42
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Tile layout

Good morning! What do y’all think is the best way to lay out 12x24 tiles in this shower? Should I center the bottom row of each wall? The hardware on the left side wall, the one visible from the bathroom entrance, isn’t centered, btw.
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Unread 12-23-2021, 03:04 PM   #43
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I usually center the main wall and let the pattern flow thru the corners. To me it looks better and creates less waste. But, there are no rules, the best way is the one you like.
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Unread 12-23-2021, 05:00 PM   #44
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I totally agree with Davy.....
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Unread 12-23-2021, 09:19 PM   #45
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Ok, I will do it that way! Thanks! Do you center on the bottom row, the center of the main wall, or the hardware?
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