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Unread 04-29-2021, 06:26 PM   #31
Just In Tile LLC
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Some pics Lou, and check my previous post that’s on page 2
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Unread 04-29-2021, 07:09 PM   #32
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Thanks Justin, makes sense and the photos help. That is one crisp corner!

I’m using new, whole sheets of lath, but I’m running them with 8’ dimension horizontal. I had it in my head lath was directional and it needed to feel smooth when running my hand downwards, and rough going up. But I’m wrong on that? It can be installed any which way?

In any case, the shower is only 3’ x 3’. So my “method” was causing each sheet to span 2, if not 3, inside corners. I tried transferring measurements and pre-bending @ inside corners but I was off just enough that by 2nd or 3rd corner I was trying to re-bend the lath like 1/2” away from the pre-bend, which just made the rounded corners worse.

Any suggestions on pneumatic stapler? What type / size of staples do you use?

I assume when the backs of niches are just the backside of drywall, stick with hand stapler and 1/2”?
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Unread 04-30-2021, 05:32 AM   #33
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Chicken’ war!!

Davy and Justin got ya covered for the diamond lath gold nuggets.
A wide crown staple gun or roofing nailer have always proven themselves on lathing days
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Unread 04-30-2021, 06:28 AM   #34
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The lath IS directional, and you are correct on how you should run it. “Cups up” is the saying we always had. BUT the correct orientation for the wire makes little difference on a scratch and brown job because you aren’t loading the wire up in one sitting and expecting it to hold the mud. But I still pay attention and don’t run it upside down “cups down” because it’s ingrained in my psyche.

I bought a surbonder stapler off of Amazon that uses T50 staples thinking I was getting a deal and saw Lowe’s had an Arrow brand for the same price. If my surebonder quits I’ll just buy another one at Lowe’s.

Yes for the niche backs I’d felt it and use a hand stapler on the wire.

As for how small the shower is I’d of probably measured the back wall plus to the first stud on the left and right and cut the wire so it would make the bend and fasten to that first stud on the walls perpendicular to the back wall. Trying to bring in a whole sheet in that small of space is counter productive just to maintain as many full sheets as possible.
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Unread 04-30-2021, 06:48 AM   #35
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I was looking for the recommended fastening distance for nails on lath to give you some good advice to possibly screw the job off with the screws you’ve bought after you staple it... maybe someone else has that info?
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Unread 04-30-2021, 03:51 PM   #36
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I put a level on what I had done so far and my work had actually made things more out of plumb and plane then they were to start. Ended up taking the lath and felt down and starting over. Luckily I hadn’t made much progress anyways.

2nd try went much better. Got the felt nice and tight in corners by using a wood float to hold it in place while stapling. And got the lath much tighter in corners too. I tried pre-bending again but the framing was so wonky the bends never quite fit. Figured out if I used a hammer to ram the lath into the corners (versus what I was doing, just running the hammer head up and down the crease) that got it close enough.

So yeah. 2 days and 2 tries to get felt and lath up. Going to screw off some loose sections next and hopefully scratch coat on Monday.

Justin - I found this doc, page 8 says fasteners not less than every 7”. Also 1 wire tie in each 16” oc stud bay.

https://www.awci.org/cd/pdfs/9612_c.pdf

And I bought an electric stapler. I like it but it has a small metal tongue that has to be depressed before it’ll fire. So when fastening lath, I have to be careful that the tongue is pressing on wire. If it’s in a diamond space, it doesn’t trigger. Does your pneumatic have that same issue?
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Unread 04-30-2021, 06:30 PM   #37
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Prep is looking nice Lou, my stapler has that tongue on the top, I just bump fire mine unless its an overlap where it seems a bump fire won't completely set the staple in.


A hammer will beat most things into submission, I'll use it where my wire ends and can be sharp on an edge. The real question is did you end up cutting your hand while you where snipping the lath?

Thank you for the info!

Edit: Yes prebending is usually something I do for my vertical runs since it is stiffer that way and hard to make a sharp corner, on the horizontal my snips pointed in the corner and dragged down a couple times is usually enough to get the corner nice and tight.
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Last edited by Just In Tile LLC; 04-30-2021 at 06:44 PM.
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Unread 04-30-2021, 07:13 PM   #38
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Justin have you seen / used these pre-bent lath corners?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Cornerit...6696/202090282

Quote:
The real question is did you end up cutting your hand while you where snipping the lath?
The other hand is in worse shape. And I was wearing work gloves for most of the day.
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Unread 04-30-2021, 08:52 PM   #39
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I have seen those corners, if they were readily available I'd buy them for my niches. But our Lowes discontinued all stucco supplies so I'm out of luck for now. I don't like stockpiling supplies in my shop shed.


NOW you are a true mud miester! Of course I still get cut every once in awhile and blame it on my helper.
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Unread 05-02-2021, 09:23 PM   #40
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Lath is unpredictable. Sometimes the snags that hurt the most won't hardly bleed. The next time you'll have blood everywhere and not know where it's coming from.
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Unread 05-03-2021, 02:57 PM   #41
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Ended up using those 3/4” lath screws to screw everything off. The staples were holding but there still seemed to be quite a bit of movement. Those lath screws suck though, even an impact driver wouldn’t seat them, plus it stripped almost every one. Next time I think I’ll invest in wide crown pneumatic stapler.

Used some 4” zip ties to tie off lath overlaps in each stud bay.

And finally got scratch coat up. Almost gave up. First wall I was trying to eyeball 3/8” thickness or so. Went to scratch it with a ditra trowel and it was pulling out mud everywhere and making a raggedy mess. Scraped all the mud off basically back to the lath (ha, photo shows huuuge pile of mud on floor), and saw that just using a scrap of lath to scratch that thin remaining coat seemed to work.

Remaining walls I just went with that method. One trowel of mud, one up and one down stroke on the wall keeping trowel tight to lath, move over, repeat. Once wall was filled I immediately scratched. This process in the ballpark of correct?

Also, my scratch has a ton of clinkers. Is this normal? And do I hit the walls with a rub brick tomorrow to get rid of them all?

I didn’t bother scratching anywhere there was solid backing. Figured I could do it in one shot when I float the second coat. This correct?

When I set float strips, John’s book says to stay a few inches out from corners. My straight edge is an inch or so shy of the width of walls. Why can’t I just set strips as far into the corners as possible, and just have to fill in the middle (versus middle AND edges)?

What’s the timing on floating niche and jambs? Not quite sure on that cause I’ll need to be square off the walls, and I assume they need to set up fairly firm first.

And for the second coat, am I trying to forcefully burn it in? Or just kinda gently lay it on, like icing a cake? I assume the scratch is pretty flimsy so I’d need to be careful how much pressure I apply.
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Unread 05-03-2021, 04:25 PM   #42
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Scratch rakes are cheap and I've seen them at Homer's.

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I know Davy has said he frequently scratches with a scrap of lath, though.

You can set your float strips close to the corners if you want, Lou, but you'll only do it once. First time you screed your brown coat with a horizontal sawing motion you'll immediately see why you wanna leave four inches or so on each side.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 05-03-2021, 05:33 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX
First time you screed your brown coat with a horizontal sawing motion you'll immediately see why you wanna leave four inches or so on each side.
Care to explain and save me the learning experience?
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Unread 05-03-2021, 06:07 PM   #44
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Yep, I've used a piece of lath many times but use a rake these days.

No rub stone on the scratch coat. If you have any spots that stick way out, knock them off tomorrow with a margin trowel. The scratch will be fairly strong after 1 day. You don't want to bust the mud between the studs but you can force the mud into the scratch coat with medium pressure.

You can leave the scratch coat off where there's solid backing but keep in mind that the finish coat won't set as fast in those areas.

Like Cx said, leave the screed sticks away from the corners several inches. You'll want to zig zag the straight edge as you cut the mud. The straight edge needs to be several inches shorter than the width of the wall to have room to cut the mud back and forth.

If the scratch dries too much, you may have to wet it down a little. I like using a yard sprayer for this. But if it dries only one day, it's probably fine without wetting the walls. I just scratched out a shower on Friday. Today I wet the walls after it dried out all weekend. But not too much water. You want the scratch coat to pull some moisture out of your finish coat.

I usually mud the niche after I mud all the walls.
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Unread 05-03-2021, 06:12 PM   #45
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Here's Jack mudding a tub surround.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mkbgoykj6o
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