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Unread 07-31-2021, 12:58 PM   #1
ITY
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What wet tile saw would you buy today (2021)?

I'm looking to buy a professional and accurate wet tile saw, capable of cleaning trimming the thinnest shapes of the most delicate tiles, in order to use as a DIY tool for 2 or 3 years over several projects, and then sell when the projects are complete.

In order to be able to sell that saw to someone like you, a professional, or another DIY'er who takes the time to research what works well and what doesn't, it would be best if I better understood the types and brands of wet tile saws that you like, and why.

Good saws of yesterday (ie, the D24000) may be built differently (cheaper, not as accurate or reliable) today as they were when this forum began, so searching forum threads from 15 years ago may not be as instructive in current times.

New saws that didn't exist back then may have emerged as the go to tools of choice now, so seeing how these new saws compare to the benchmark wet tile saws of times past would also be interesting.

It seems that there are tile saws where one moves the tile into the blade, and tile saws where one moves the blade into the tile. Sled saws and bridge saws, if you will.

Length of tile being cut is likely a factor in choice, as well as bulkiness and weight of the saw. Obviously, cost is a factor as well... but strangely, I'm flexible in all these areas, as I'm willing to pay for more than what I may need, if it is a more widely desireable tool that is more likely to command more of it's purchase price back when I'm done with it.

I could rent, but at my slow and contemplative pace, I'd rather just own it, and use it when and where and for however long I feel like, at a moments notice, whenever I can fit it in.

I also recognize that more than one type of wet tile saw, along with several other types of tile cutting tools (snap cutter, nibbler, etc) are in a tile setter's quiver, but I want to focus on choosing a wet tile saw.

What are your preferences in current times (2021), and why?
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Unread 07-31-2021, 03:11 PM   #2
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I've used many...but for the money, I like the "Diamondback" saw with the Pearl P4 blade. Very inexpensive and quite accurate.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...E3DB&FORM=VIRE
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Unread 08-01-2021, 07:59 AM   #3
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Do you happen to know what size tiles you'll likely be using in those projects? My tile saw choice wouldn't be the same for mosaics as it would be for 12x24 tiles. This is why I have 3 different size saws.

I don't know anything about the newest model saws but I will say that the belt driven saws, especially the Target saws with the Baldor motor will outlast the direct drive saws like the DeWalt. But, the Dewalt has more bells and whistles and is a good saw. My 2 Target saws are 15+ years old and I've only replaced the switch (and blades of course) on them. You probably don't need a saw that'll last 15-20 years so the DeWalt might be a good choice for you. I bought a DeWalt because of the bells and whistles and used it for about 3 years before the motor gave out.

As for blade choice, I like the Pearl blade Laz mentioned.
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Unread 08-01-2021, 02:15 PM   #4
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Lazarus...

Thank you for the video link. I watched the first video, and then watched the follow up video recorded 10 months later on the 7" DiamondBack saw, and then watched the same fellow (Landberg... is that you Lazarus?) again in a video on Harbor Freight's 10" DiamondBack wet saw.

The 10" model addressed the 3 complaints the fellow had about the 7" Diamondback, where the 7" lacked a rubber surface on the sled for cutting tiles upside down, lacked side trays for containing water overspray and spillage, and lacked a sled wing to support cross cutting long tiles. By contrast, the 10" Diamondback had all of these features, in addition to wheels for transport and a larger motor.

His complaint with the 10", that I also found echoed in reviews, was the sequential (as opposed to simultaneous) water pump control switch and saw control switch operation. Interesting details. I also noted that he dismissed all the tearout of the backing of the glass he cut with the 10", but isn't the edge to edge integrity of that backing membrane critical to the appearance of glass tiles?

YouTube pushed a bunch more related videos in my face at the conclusion of each, and I hadn't realized just how many videos exist that attempt to answer my question posted in the original post. I always forget to go to YouTube... preferring to read & discuss than be run over by a truck (in several senses of metaphor).

Thank you for the reminder, and for the recommendation.


Davy...

Of the three saws that you have...

Which saw would you use for mosaics, and why?

Which saw would you use for 12 x 24 porcelain, and why?

What is your third saw, and what would you use it for?


I'm not sure what all sizes of tile I might be cutting. I'm only now learning how tile sizes have changed dramatically since the '80's, when I last concerned myself with tiling.

Apparantly, in the 40 years since, the combination of improved formulations of porcelain, thinset mortars, adhesives, water/vapor control, and installation techniques have enabled larger and larger and larger tiles to be made and not end up falling off the walls.

The availability of larger tiles have expanded consumer tastes. "Bigger is better" I guess. I was standing in Floor & Decor for a long time, not looking at tile, but listening to the shoppers in the store describe to their salesperson what they were looking for... pointing favorably toward huge 36" x 36" hunks of stuff that would be unimaginable to me in a home. Maybe a State Capitol or university library, but a residence?

In keeping with the Schluter Systems advertising banner at the top of every JohnBridge forum page, I am trying to adjust my aesthetics to be "Totally on Trend" as I figure out how to update the homes I'm responsible for. So that is the long way of saying "I don't know" what sizes of tile I'll be cutting. Yet.

Hearing what sizes of tile you cut, and what saw you use to cut each type, will be instructive to me, and perhaps to others reading in the future.
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Unread 08-02-2021, 04:58 PM   #5
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I have two Target saws and one MK370 saw. The MK is small and mainly used for 4 or 6 inch tiles usually in high rise buildings where there's no space to set up (or clean up) a large saw. The smaller Target (I can't remember the model number but might be T10100) is used more than the other two. We use it for mosaics and other tiles up to 16 inch. The large Target saw has two sliding trays that are wider with a much longer and wider tub for larger tiles. The support pillar is further away from the blade allowing for larger tiles to pass thru. Both Target saws have plenty power to cut thru about anything we would need. The MK cuts much slower and has much less power. We might use the MK once every five years.
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Unread 08-03-2021, 05:11 PM   #6
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Ity...no, that was not me......Just a tile guy that used the product......
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Unread 08-03-2021, 09:09 PM   #7
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Thanks for your responses Davy and Lazarus.

A new plot twist cropped up in my situation, that should have no bearing on the general purpose of this thread, which is to expose and explore the go to saws of today. I just need to add the go to wet tile saw blades of today as well. Especially since the blade that comes with any given saw may not be the best blade, as illustrated by the reviewer of the Diamondback saws from HF.

A neighbor just now lent me his IMER Masonry 350F, that he bought new 20 years ago, used it to do the marble flooring in his house. It had been 17 years or so since he used it, so it was a bit of an archaeological dig through a storage building to retrieve it.

With the saw weighing nearly 300 lbs all in, it is a bit unwieldy for everyday tiling, unless cutting block, stone, and pavers. And the 14" blade on a fixed (but plunging) head is likely like trying to use a 10 lb sledge hammer to hit a 1 penny finish nail when trimming a 1/2" slice off of 4.24" square glazed ceramic wall tiles with a soft white bisque.

However, the ungainly green thing is in my truck now, and I'm trying to find a continuous rim 14" blade with a thick center for stability and 10 mm of diamonds embedded in bronze or resin for the white and red bisque ceramic tiles I'm going to be cutting first.

I understand that a top quality blade of this size will cost more than an entire used tile saw from HF, but the blade is what does the sawing, and I plan to give the new blade to the neighbor as a thank you for lending me the saw, and as such I'm not going to cheap out on a gesture of appreciation.

So that is the plot twist. I'm still interesting in learning about the best tile saws to buy, but at the present moment, I'm now shopping for blades, and am worried that CX might run the wet saw across my neck, or at least boot me off the forum, if I were to start a new thread just on blades.

As blades are very much a part of a wet saw, and since there are likely blades available in 2021 that were not around in 2011, a discussion on the latest in wet saw blades is part and parcel with the latest wet saws.

So, any suggestions on blades would be appreciated. From JB forum reading of threads of yesteryear, the Pearl Abrasives P4 (a Fire and Rescue blade???), the RTC T3 Razor, the RTC Stealth, the MK HotDog, and a blade from a long thread begun by a member named Bill that is sold by a couple guys in Florida, and is dubbed the "Zipper".

I have no experience with any of the foregoing, or any of the following, blades. I'll first list the sought for blade characteristics, then list a couple of cutting concerns, and finally will list the blade candidates found thus far that I'm currently considering:

CHARACTERISTICS:

14" diameter
1" arbor
Continuous Rim
10 mm diamond rim (head doesn't tilt, tiles must be tilted with jig on cart)
Bonding matrix of diamonds conducive to glossy glazed ceramic body tiles
Thickened center (but blades that large tend to be thick throughout ? )
1/8" max thickness, per IMER specifications
2,300 RPM as reduced by belt drive at arbor (motor is 3,260 RPM)


CONCERNS:

Glazed surface chip outs (low cost ceramic to match existing)
Cutting radius bullnoses (two plane/dimensional pieces)
Drift, Deflection, Deviation (thin shaves to resize tiles to match)
Zero Clearance Insert (what ZCI material will not gum up diamond matrix ? )


CANDIDATES:

Diamond Products Premium Black 14" x .080 x 1" Part # 87724
(Bond Spec: TI10P - Fast cutting in ceramic or fiberglass and other soft, porous tiles. A TI7P bond for hard porcelain, glass, & marble is available.)

Diamond Products Heavy Duty Orange 14” x .080 x 1” Part # 87716
(Bond Spec: TI10P - Fast cutting in ceramic or fiberglass and other soft, porous tiles. A TI7P bond for hard porcelain, glass, & marble is available.)


MK Diamond Supreme Grade Super Hi-Rim 14" x .090 x 1" MK-415 #155130
("Uses: Ceramic Tile- Best+; Porcelain Tile- Best+; Vitreous Tile- Best+)

MK Diamond Supreme Grade Super Hi-Rim 14" x .090 x 1" MK-315 #153548
("Uses: Ceramic Tile- Best+; Porcelain Tile- Better; Vitreous Tile- Better)


IMER U.S.A., Inc. / IMER International S.p.A. 14" x .090 x 1" Part # 1193924
("Continuous Rim diamond for Porcelain and Hard Materials" )


Any other candidates I should add to this list?

Any other functional or operational concerns I should have?

Any other considerations I should consider?

As always, your thoughts are much appreciated.

.
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Last edited by ITY; 08-05-2021 at 10:01 AM. Reason: Changed brand description from Raimondi to RTC for the T3 Razor & Stealth blades
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Unread 08-05-2021, 10:26 AM   #8
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Surely the lack of response is the silence of muffled laughter, as finding a 14" diameter tile blade is likely very funny to read about, but no joke to actually accomplish, especially in these times of no inventory, not enough employees, no shipping containers, no raw materials, etc.

I did end up ordering the first candidate listed, but might end up receiving a harder matrix than requested. I won't know until at least a week from now, while waiting for it to arrive.

In the journey of diamond saw blade research, I learned a few things along the way, which may be of intrigue to some, and "what else is new" to others.

Most diamond saw blades that are not made in China appear to be made in either Indonesia, Thailand, or Korea.

Even blades which used to be advertised as Made In USA are in fact only finished in the USA, but are actually made in southeast Asia. The "finishing" of the blade that takes place in the USA amounts to painting it and laserprinting or etching the brand/logo on it, and packaging it for distribution and retail sale.

I was not able to find a diamond wet saw tile blade where the steel disc was formed and tensioned, where the diamond matrix was mixed and baked, where the segments were sintered or laser welded, or in the case of my search for continuous rim blades, where any functional part of the blade was made domestically.

This held true even for diamond blade manufacturers that actually do still make diamond blades in the USA. They just no longer make them for tile work. They reserve that manufacturing capacity for the much more expensive concrete, asphalt, mining, and coring type cutting and grinding operations. Heavy work. Big machinery. Less volume. Larger margins.

If anyone is aware of a tile saw blade still made in USA, kindly post up what brand and type it is, so I can look into it.

If the blade I ordered for the 14" saw ends up having the wrong bond matrix, I will set it aside, and buy a 10" blade for an older Chicago Electric Harbor Freight saw that another neighbor has now lent me to fix up for him.

I'm also still shopping for my own tile saw... so the accumulation of experiences garnered from borrowed saws will certainly help inform my eventual saw purchase decision.

In the meantime, I remain looking forward to any further input from you.
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Unread 08-05-2021, 10:13 PM   #9
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No, no laughter.

Lack of response may be due to less pros on here contributing, or those that do contribute are busy working, or that the questions you are asking are both wide and require lots of typing.

First, knock yourself out with as much research as you like. I myself, love researching stuff till the cows come home. But nothing beats first-hand experience.

The MK and Imer brands we recognize. But the first two blades with the diamond products name could be one of literally hundreds of Chinese manufacturers. The name is too vague. Unless you’ve got a link and we recognize it, I’m afraid we can’t add much comment to them. But in short, you want to match the blade to what you’re cutting. You already know that as you’re talking about the hardness of the matrix. But you’ve only described your tile as glossy ceramic. How hard is it compared to soft wall tile, or ceramic floor tile, or hard porcelain, or ultra hard porcelain? If I was going into a purchase a little “blind” on what my tile was, I’d tend to get a blade that errored on the harder side, knowing that I could use it for the nasty hard porcelains that are so prevalent these days...and use it for softer tiles with the understanding that I’d have to sharpen it (wear away some of the matrix) more often than usual. A Hot Dog or Razor or Cyclone (turbo-style rim, but still cuts very smooth) is what I’d have in mind.

As far as trying to return the Imer saw with a nice blade to your neighbor....
It’s a nice thought, but it’s been 17 years since they used it. It probably doesn’t matter what blade you return it with because they probably aren’t going to be using it any time soon. If it was my tool that was lent out, I’d be happy if it came back in one piece and it was returned nice and clean. If you must, a case of beer or a small something is way more than enough thanks. Get whichever blade suits your tile and don’t worry about it after that.

Speaking of the blade that was on the saw...have you tried it? Since they were cutting marble, they may have gotten a blade for it...but you never know.

As far as the Harbor Freight saw...
You are statistically not likely to be as happy as Laz. Quality control is not consistent on their saws. Your opening sentence of your first post said you’re looking for a pro quality saw that is accurate. That’s not this saw. Laz got lucky. Will you get lucky? Everybody considering this saw crosses their fingers and sure hopes so. But most of them are disappointed. If Harbor Freight routinely made saws to match Laz’s, word would get out about great quality and they would increase the price by $300. But feel free to give it a go if you must.

On your wishlist for a wet saw, you are describing a Target or Felker with a heavy motor. They are accurate and heavy duty for the long haul. They are built like tanks. Pros love them...except for their heavy weight. My saw is 108 pounds and doesn’t disassemble for transport. It’s a chore moving it around. If you want accuracy that these saws are known for, but are willing to give a little, an MK 101 could do the trick for you. If you want to up the ante on features, but are willing to compromise on the longevity of the heavy motor, a DeWALT 10” is perfect. It’s got a lot going for it, except it only lasts a few years if you pound on it daily. With the jobs you’re describing for your house, the saw would last 20 years in hands of a homeowner who gave it modest care and used it from time to time. This saw is popular and has been relatively easy to sell when you’re done with it if you clean it up and price it appropriately.
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Unread 08-07-2021, 01:03 PM   #10
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@Tool Guy - Kg

Thank you for all of the typing you took the time to contribute in answer to this question, not only on my behalf, but on behalf of anyone else standing in similar crossroads.

I really appreciated your detailed perspectives.

In another unintended turn of events, I bought another blade impromptu, site unseen, knowledge unknown, while at a Customs training seminar. After it was over, I asked the ladies upfront to pull down the Rubi blades hanging behind the counter so that I could examine them a bit closer.

Overhearing my request, the shop manager jumped out from the back office and said THIS is the blade you want. Cuts like butter. No stiction. No stuttering. Smooth as glass, and even cuts glass.

At the mention of "glass" I started my sophomoric sputtering about bond matrix and the material hardness of the bisque I was cutting bla bla bla and she stopped me short by saying "You can buy whatever blade you want. But THIS is the blade I personally use and recommend. It's the best blade we have in the store. It's also the most expensive blade, but I'll give you 10% off."

Who am I to doubt her? Whatamigonna do, NOT listen to her? So I bought her blade (10") to mount on the borrowed HF saw as a backup in case the 14" saw doesn't work out.

It's a J blade, if I understand the meaning of J correctly, where the radial relief cuts in the main body of the blade stemming off from the diamond rim are somewhat shaped like the letter J, terminating into a spiral circle upon itself. However, the top stem of the "J" does not divide the cutting segment. Rather, it is a continuous unbroken rim, with 9.5 mm (3/8") of diamond segment height.

The exiting part of the blade to me is that the disc has a thicker main body from the arbor to about 2.5" shy of the diamond rim, for blade stiffening. I haven't removed the blade from the blister pack yet, but the body of the blade feels as if it is 1/8" thick, while the cutting rim (along with the 2" inboard of the rim) is said to be 1/16" thick per the manufacturer's spec.

It is called the RUBI Venom Wet Diamond blade. I'm not sure if I am allowed to post links yet, but simply googling Rubi Venom will take anyone interested straight away to their description of this blade, that was entirely off of my radar until presented with it at the tile supplier.

RUBI obviously offers a variety of blades at different price points, but among their "Premium" line of highest quality blades, there appears to be several snaky sounding brand names (ie Arrowhead, Viper, Red Cobra, Venom), and of the Venom I purchased, RUBI states:

Quote:
Originally Posted by RUBI
VENOM blades are the definitive option for professionals who have to face a wide variety of materials (ceramic, porcelain, marble, granite ...) Thanks to their studied design, VENOM blades reduce stresses and increase the speed of cut without giving up some excellent finishes.
On Edit:

I've since had a chance to actually search for this specific blade online. RUBI's website was confusing, as a photo of the Red Cobra blade was given the Venom description, and vice versa. It was not until I saw these blades on Contractors Direct that the reason for this confusion became clear.

The Red Cobra is the new name for the Venom. According to Contractor's Direct, they are in fact the same blade. In the case of the 10" size, the RUBI part number for both Venom and Red Cobra is Reference # 31961. This detail, that RUBI's website fails to clarify, might help future readers searching for reviews of this blade (not many exist), now knowing that Red Cobra and Venom product names are interchangeable.

I won't be able to report if the VENOM blade is on par with the likes of T3 Razor or Hot Dog or P4... because I haven't used those other blades. And, if I have difficulties cutting with the VENOM blade, the two obvious factors that must not be forgotten are my inexperience, and how bad the old Chicago Electric (pre "Diamondback" era) saw is, which I successfully repaired btw.

So that's the update. In the days and weeks to come, as I get underway, I'll learn more about what I want and don't want in a tile saw.

In the meantime, reading what all of you like and don't like about your current tile saw, and/or want or don't want in your future tile saw, will be very instructive.
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Last edited by ITY; 08-07-2021 at 03:42 PM. Reason: To add updated info on Red Cobra being the new name for Venom blades
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Unread 08-07-2021, 07:02 PM   #11
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I’ve had a Husqvarna Ts70 for over a year. I have 2 knocks on the saw, it is on wheels but it’s 140lbs and the water containment could be better. It’s belt driven which is my preferred type and why I bought it. I also have a target Xl and a smaller target. They still get used but the T70 is superior.

I would have bought a DeWalt if it was belt driven which would most likely give it better longevity . For what you need it for that’s what I recommend.
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Unread 08-09-2021, 04:43 PM   #12
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I think the Dewalt is an amazing saw, but I'm also pro belt driven. I used the first generation Dewalt saws when our company bought 2 when they came out. Such a slick saw feature wise...after a year they were showing serious signs of wear, and had bearings replaced.

In the meantime all the old-timers pulled out their belt driven targets and felkers from their sheds when we had the Dewalts worked on...no features, slower rpms, trays were simplistic, and they are heavy, but they worked flawless. Guys told me it was the saw they bought when they became "setters". I ended up buying the Husqvarna TS-250 X3 as my first saw with a rolling stand and spring assist lift. The Baldor motor is super quiet and is used everyday by me still. I haven't had to buy another saw and don't plan to for the rest of my tile career. Saw rolls outta my trailer, no lifting a saw onto a stand and cuts 1/2" slivers for breakfast...Can't beat a quality belt driven saw.
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Unread 08-09-2021, 09:31 PM   #13
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I hear you loud and clear on (or should I say "over") the belt driven Baldor motor.

Even the Taiwanese knock off Baldor-like motor from Ganfong, which is the motor used on Pearl Abrasive's VX.102XL Pro 1.5 HP (real running HP, consuming 15 amps, not "peak developed" HP consuming only 8 amps) is a much quieter saw to hear you over, compared to the direct drive screamers.

Before I began this thread, I actually bought a Pearl. Found it on Craigs, and while I didn't know the brand or model number, from other experience with tools I instantly recognized it as a professional level tool that an old timer can pull out and use when the brightly colored plastic PRC built saws go on the blink.

I also recognized another opportunity... the seller of this claimed to be a tile contractor (confirmed by the sign on his truck parked out front), so I asked him what else he had for sale. As he pulled tools out of his garage (a snap cutter, a screed, and a skil saw he configured to hook up to a water hose while cutting granite counters), he named his price for each tool.

Adding it up in my head as he went, I did not even attempt to negotiate. When he stopped putting tools out in the driveway, I rounded up my offer and handed him the cash in $100 bills, not asking for change.

But what did he do? He said he needed to go inside and get a calculator.

While he was doing that, I took a closer look at the blade on the saw that he described as a "brand new $92 blade". It had two broken off segments. The saw itself was so plastered in slurry that I had to chip it off to read the motor plate, and never did find the model number to the saw. I only deduced it by comparing it's shape to the four models of 10" saws that Pearl offers currently, even though this saw was 15 years old, or so he said.

If the true age, and condition, were anything like he described his blade to be, then it was likely older. I looked at the tray rollers. The flanges were worn away. The saw ran fine, but I didn't test the pump, didn't bring a tile to cut, nor did I check the blade for squareness to the sliding cart... all things that I will be certain to do next time.

I also noticed that when he brought out the snap cutter, a Felker, he just slid it across the concrete of his driveway, and when he put the cutter back in the case, he tossed the wheel cutters in any old place, which would allow them to get knicked, as well as the slide bars to get knicked, as the loose parts banged around in the case once picked up and transported. The Felker case came with provisions to safely store the wheeled cutting tooling, provisions which he didn't bother to utilize.

So out he comes with his calculator in hand. He adds everything up, only to find that I had paid him $10 more than what he asked for. As I go to load my truck, he takes the screed bar back and puts it in his garage.

Then he stops me, and says that the stand that the tile saw is sitting on is extra. As in $50 extra, and this was after he had already accepted the money I paid him, at his stated prices, for everything he brought out to the driveway.

At this point I was done. I asked for my money back. He said "Wait a minute, I don't like this." He then asked for less for the stand, but it was too late. He had been condescending and rude to me for the entire experience, and I didn't want to reward that kind of behavior with a sale.

With all his stuff having never left his driveway, he had no choice but to return my money, and I left.

Days later, he changed his ad to specifically include the stand with the saw (no additional charge), and also disclosed the model number of the saw, that he had refused to tell me, and ridiculed me for asking about. (I needed the model number to determine parts availability... such as replacing the worn out rollers under the tray).

He also changed the included blade description from "brand new" to "a little worn, with some life left". Who would expect chip free cuts from a chipped up blade with hunks of segments entirely missing?

So there you have it. Lessons learned from trying to buy a professional tile saw used. Well used. From someone who wasn't very forthcoming, or nice about it. He also spent a lot of time talking about how "honest" he was. That's always a bad sign. A lion need not tell me he is a lion. And this fellow was already caught lyin'. He even quipped that anyone who is trying to cut tiles perfectly straight is an amateur. He claimed 35 years of experience as a tile contractor. He did not appear to maintain or care for his equipment.

Which brings me to buying my own saw, new if necessary, because I do take care to cut as straight as possible, and I do take care of my equipment. It's what amateurs do. And one day, a professional will be happy that I did.
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Unread 08-16-2021, 01:28 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Guy - Kg View Post
First, knock yourself out with as much research as you like. I myself, love researching stuff till the cows come home. But nothing beats first-hand experience.
That is exactly why I'm here. Listening. I respect your experience.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Guy - Kg View Post
As far as the Harbor Freight saw...
You are statistically not likely to be as happy as Laz. Quality control is not consistent on their saws. Your opening sentence of your first post said you’re looking for a pro quality saw that is accurate. That’s not this saw. Laz got lucky. Will you get lucky? Everybody considering this saw crosses their fingers and sure hopes so. But most of them are disappointed. If Harbor Freight routinely made saws to match Laz’s, word would get out about great quality and they would increase the price by $300. But feel free to give it a go if you must.
I gave it a a go. I fell in line with your statistics. I was not happy.

To be fair to Laz, the saw I tried to make work was the Chicago Electric 10" tile saw... not the newest Diamond Back version of the same saw.

Some parts of the saw Chicago Electric 10" are indeed the same as the new Diamond Back 10" saw. The head assembly, and the cart/sled/table rail assembly, most critically.

What DIFFERS with the new DiamondBack version is the water spigot assembly to cool the blade. This is essential, as the old Chicago Electric version dribbles water on the table and on the tile... but not on the blade.

Without cutting a single tile, my tests of the old Chicago Electric saw made it readily apparent that my brand new blade would dull quite quickly based on how the water was pouring out of the holes, while the blade was dry.

I wasted an entire day trying to find parts to improvise the Chicago Electric saw to spray water onto the blade, to both cool and lubricate the cutting interface with the tile. My ad hoc improvisations improved the flow to the blade, but the result was nothing like the way the a properly watered wet saw should rooster tail water spray at the diamond rim.

Not gonna ruin an $80 blade for lack of cooling and lubrication.

The new DiamondBack saws, even while they have the same head assembly, have a vastly improved water piping that includes arms that direct water to the blade, rather than around it.

The DiamondBack 10" saw also has a deeper and larger support arm, more water catching trays, better rubber on the main tray, a larger side tray, larger tile cutting capacity (but not as large as the similar Delta Cruzer, Rubi, or Kobalt), and a die cast blade cover instead of the plastic blade cover of the previous Chicago Electric 10" saw.

While analyzing every detail of the DiamondBack improvements over the earlier Chicago Electric saw, I came to the realization that the same overseas manufacture that makes the DiamondBack saw, also makes the Kobalt saws, the Delta Cruzer saw, and the upcoming Rubi 10" saw.

The plunging head castings are the exact same. The motors are the same internally. What differs are the plastic motor housings/coverings, the diecast blade housings (although several brands share the same Laser and Light accessory), and the table rail designs. The Delta Cruzer, the upcoming Rubi, and the new Kobalt all share the exact same "gravity rise" wheeled stand (a knock off of an originally Bosch design).

In other words, along with the DeWalt, all of these import saws are likely pumped out of the same factory, with different colors and frosting, and in some cases, with differentiation in the rail design for the table.

Besides the water issue, the Chicago Electric worked fine with the single thickness blade that my neighbor had on it. But when I mounted my brand new Rubi Venom blade, with the thickened middle section, the direct drive motor shuddered unwillingly when turning the motor off.

Belt drive began beckoning.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Guy - Kg View Post
On your wishlist for a wet saw, you are describing a Target or Felker with a heavy motor. They are accurate and heavy duty for the long haul. They are built like tanks. Pros love them...except for their heavy weight. My saw is 108 pounds and doesn’t disassemble for transport. It’s a chore moving it around. If you want accuracy that these saws are known for, but are willing to give a little, an MK 101 could do the trick for you.

What did you mean by "but are willing to give a little"?

Did you mean willing to compromise a little?

What would I be compromising with an MK-101, versus say, a Target or Felker?

I ask this because I ended up buying an MK-101.

The MK-101 is what I've always picture in my head when I thought of tile saws, even though at the time I never thought I'd be tiling. The MK-101 is a uniquely American brand and USA built saw, so it isn't likely what the Italian craftsment in Italy picture in their head when they think tile saw.

They are probably thinking Brevetti Montolite rail/bridge saw when they picture the ideal tile saw in their head, and I'm beginning to think that a bridge/rail saw would be what I would purchase if pursuing a career in tile and stone, given the 24" x 48" tiles that are displayed in Floor & Decor, as well as the upcoming trend of Gauged Porcelain Tiles on walls.

But the traditional, archetype, every day professional tile saw was MK Diamond on all the job sites I've ever been on (noticing the tile setters, not setting tiles myself). So that probably had a great deal of influence on what I ended up buying, along with your mentioning the MK-101.

Still, I'm curious what you meant when you said "but are willing to give a little". What am I giving up? This is not asked to challenge your assessment, but rather, it is asked to help me expand my awareness.

The MK-101 I bought purred just like the Pearl VX10 that I walked away from, only the Peal had a Taiwanese motor of 1.5 HP, while this USA made MK-101 has a Baldor motor rated at 1 3/4 HP, drawing 15 amps, which is more power than what the new MK-101 saws are advertised at today.

I hope to make good use of this saw, and plan to take care of it well enough to be able to pass along to the next person seeking a quality professional tile saw.
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Unread 08-17-2021, 11:20 PM   #15
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