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Old 04-15-2019, 08:05 PM   #1
Obo2
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Kitchen Floor Help

Hi floor people!
I made this https://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin...d.php?t=124199 thread over a year ago and am finally getting around to doing the kitchen!

You folks were so helpful before i figured i'd come bend your ear some more.

Still have the same american olean 12x24 tiles.
Below is the kitchen floor after pulling up the sheet vinyl and application of hot soapy water and a bully floor scraper.

Please inform me of the best way of prepping this portion of concrete slab. This same leveling compound/skim coat was present in my upstairs rooms and was ground out in a huge cloud of dust with a flappy wheel on my angle grinder.

I'd really like to keep the dust down and make the job as easy as possible.

Near the back you can see a small storage space that had carpet with some remains of glue and a whole bunch of matte wall paint I'm guessing this also will need to be mechanically removed without use of solvents.

Requirements for thinset between cement and LFT porcelain?

Thanks folks
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:50 PM   #2
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Nick,

Can't be sure it's size justifiable from the photo, but you may be able to rent a 17 inch floor buffer with an attachment for concrete prepping. We've used one made by Malish called a Dimabrush concrete prep tool.

Makes a righteous racket, it does. I use ear plugs to avoid brain liquification.

You use it wet to avoid airborne dust. 'Course that just makes dust+water=mud
If the floor size justifies, you can rent a wetvac. Or just mop up the muck.

We use them for prep to polish the concrete, so we hasta get just about every teensy spot of mastic off. But for what you need, that level of removal would be overkill. Good quality thinset doesn't require perfection. If you get 95% off, you'll be good.



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Old 04-16-2019, 08:31 AM   #3
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Sq ft

I believe i calculated 150 sqft for purchasing tile so a bit less than that.

May well be worth it to forego the extra expense and hassle of hanging plastic sheet and a decent dusk mask as well as being able to return the appliances and having a functioning kitchen quickly.

It would probably need to get very close to the edges to make it worth while.

Has anyone done a cup wheel with some sort of splash guard and done it wet?
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Old 04-16-2019, 09:21 AM   #4
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Scraping

I am making a bit of progress soaking the material and using the floor scaper. This is slow going and i'm worried it won't remove enough for proper adhesion.
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Old 04-16-2019, 07:11 PM   #5
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Progress?

A days worth of putzing around letting the towel soak for a bit and scraping. Most of it came up, whats left is mostly just leftover slurry.

So is scraping it down and then mopping till the water and concrete come clean sufficient prep or do i need the scarification of something more abrasive to really clean and open the pores of the cement?
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Old 04-16-2019, 07:11 PM   #6
Davy
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You can use a cup wheel on a grinder (variable speed is best) that has a vacuum attachment shroud. It catches most of the dust and will get it clean to the slab. It doesn't hurt to get most of it up using the scraper like you're doing, then use the grinder.
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Old 04-16-2019, 08:04 PM   #7
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You might try a 4 in scraper with a razor blade like you would find in the paint department of your local box store. If the glue is still tacky as your scraping it up ( most time it is) it will want to stick to the blade of the scraper. You can sprinkle thinset( cheapest you can buy) over the floor and the glue will ball up in the thinset and not stick to the blade of the scraper. If you kneel down and scrape in a half moon type motion, that seems to work the best. I know the drawing is ridiculous but I didn't know how else to explain it.
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Old 04-16-2019, 08:36 PM   #8
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I would agree with Shawn's approach to the tacky glue problem, but I'd recommend pure Portland cement in lieu of the thinset mortar. Less expensive and works quite well.

Might wanna consider wearing a dust mask whilst spreading it about, though.

Not sure I could follow his plan for scraping. The drawing is pretty complicated.
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Old 04-16-2019, 10:12 PM   #9
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Portland would be a good choice, finer powder, I learned with floor patch as the guy I worked for didn't do tile. But I have switched to thinset cause the stuff I put under backer board is only like $6.00/ 50lb bag but CX is right I can get a 95lb bag of Portland for about the same price. Thanks for reminding me of that
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Old 04-16-2019, 10:24 PM   #10
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I'd pay the extra couple of bucks to not have to lift a 94 lb. bag.
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Old 04-16-2019, 10:44 PM   #11
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Whatever nonsense is on my floor

The glue isn't tacky at all.

The thin orange layer appears to be some sort of adhesive but there also seems to be some sort of gypsum(?) Based product that just turns to fine dust. It softens a little when soaked i'd guess it's a leveling compound same stuff used both on concrete downstairs as well as on osb type subfloor upstairs anywhere sheet vinyl was present.

Will probably try doing the cup wheel with soaking the material, bottle of elbow grease is running a little low.
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Old 04-16-2019, 11:38 PM   #12
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Yeah, I forgot to mention that 'elbow grease' is the other secret ingredient!

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Old 04-17-2019, 02:01 AM   #13
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Be forewarned, using the grinder on a wet, soupy floor will result in that mess being slung through the air and splattered on the walls.

The dust from grinding dry is horrendous as well, so there's no easy answer.

Except to hire someone to do it all.
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