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Unread 05-12-2002, 05:41 PM   #1
Robert Villa
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Southern California
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OK, here's the setup:

Client has cove tile (1"x6") on the inside of a shower. Must be mitered, and because it crosses two planes, floor and wall, a simple miter will not do. There will be a 45 degree cut along the face, and that cut is also mitered (actually beveled), so like any crown molding in finish carpentery, it must be cut with a compound miter.

But with wood, I would just set it up in a miter saw, against the fence, just like it would lie on the wall, and move the saw blade 45 degrees and cut. No worries.

But a wet saw has no fence, and the blade is always 90 degrees to the sliding table.

Here are my options. Maybe you guys have more:

1. Trial and Error. My MK 101 saw has a bevel attachment, which lifts the end of a tile up in the air at 45 degrees to cut a bevel. Some how fuss with that to make it get fairly close. There will undoubtedly be some scrap. I don't like this idea at all.

2. Cut a Cope. Use the Bevel attachment to back cut one piece. Using nippers, cut the outline of the cove. Run one side of the cove all the way to the wall. The cut piece fits over it, outlining the exact shape. Sounds dicey to me.

3. Put a diamond blade on a wood miter saw?

4. Make a jig that puts the piece at a 45 degree angle to the blade, not bevel, but a miter. Try to stand up the cove on the jig and cut the rascal. Sounds like some scrap.

This had my head spinning this afternoon, so I think I'll have a beer, and wait until Monday or Tuesday to see what you guys think. Thanks so much for any of you who help me.
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Unread 05-12-2002, 07:19 PM   #2
Rob Z
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Hi Robert

I cut copes on tiles when necessary. I have an MK770 that will do it, and I just sold my IMER 250 that could do it.

My Target has some nifty attachments that I use to cut a cope when needed.

I use the tile saw blade, grinder, nippers, Roto Zip, and rub stone and file to finish the cope.

I wouldn't put a tile blade on a wood cutting miter saw.
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Unread 05-12-2002, 09:10 PM   #3
JC
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Why did you sell the Imer?
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Unread 05-12-2002, 10:45 PM   #4
Sonnie Layne
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Robert,

I'm a remodeler as well. Have worked by the foot installing crown mouldings custom for others. I think the cove you're installing has very little in common with the compound cuts we both integrate in wood trim. Certainly as crown is concerned you have a material that has a stand-off from either plane by 3" or more. In the case of this cove, the floor plane could really be considered square to the wall plane as it's likely the fall-off isn't more than a few degrees, and that fall doesn't have to occur except outside where the cove falls.

If the (vertical) corners aren't square, you can adjust the miter. I don't. Miter the 45's for the inside corners, nip off the backs a bit if the angle is greater than 90 just to keep the grout width the same.

As far as the compound to the floor, if you're going to start that, you'll have to trim every piece of cove to compensate for the "drop" you've added to the corner pieces.

Shift the trim a bit if necessary. It's not what you or I would do with 5" crown, but this is tile with grout. Different from magogany, natural, no pookie.

Having said that, there are many times when I just want to shine because I can. I use a diamond blade on a grinder, and a honing block in those cases.

Good luck, don't fret... grout is our friend.
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Unread 05-13-2002, 11:33 AM   #5
Scooter
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Miter It and Grind It

This is what I would do:

1. Get a 45 degree attachment for the MK101, so the tile lays flat on the table, but 45 degrees to the saw blade. There are two of them, a itsy-bitsy one and a larger one. Get the larger one so you can support the piece. Expect to pay over $100 for this rascal.

2. Lay it upright against the attachment, like you would on a fence for a miter cut of crown molding. Note the tops and bottoms. Cut the 45 degree miter. This will make the top of the cove longer than the bottom, which is what you want.

3. Now, it will fit, but will need some beveling for a good fit. Use a grinder as Rob suggested. Go slow. Get it right.

You won't see the bevel, so as suggested, grout is our friend.
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Unread 05-13-2002, 04:03 PM   #6
John Bridge
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Okay, I don't know what you're doing. If the cove is going on the vertical as well as the horizontal, you need either a cove corner or a three-way miter (three-way miter cuts resemble arrowheads -- they are pointed). If you use the cove corner, your cove cuts are square. It's like using quarter-round with an eagle beak corner.

If you are not installing the cove on the vertical but only around the wall-floor transition, the cuts will be simple miters. You simply stand the cove on the table of the saw in the position in which it will be installed and run it through.

Somebody please explain to me why this sounds so simple. I know I'm missing something.
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Unread 05-13-2002, 05:02 PM   #7
Bud Cline
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I've stayed away because I don't understand either.

In my thinking cove tiles at corners have never been an obstacle. Sometimes all that is necessary is to clip the "toe only" at a 45.

Another way is to cut one toe so as to do a "hop-over". Not the prettiest but really quick and can be done with biters.
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Unread 05-13-2002, 05:09 PM   #8
Rob Z
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What I was refering to and what I think Robert was asking about is really just a sliding bevel cut, done to reveal the portion of the trim tile that can be coped to fit on the adjacent wall.

....nothing different than using a SCMS to cut a piece of base trim, ready for the coping saw to cut away the profile.

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Unread 05-13-2002, 09:53 PM   #9
Robert Villa
 
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More Details

That little arrowhead dealybopper is exactly what I want to create.

These are straight coves, quarter-round with the glaze on the inside, a perfect quarter circle. 1"x6" pieces

They will be impossible to fit into a corner without a compound miter. If I but them together, there is this huge gap formed by the two circles.

So far the miter suggestion is most feasible, although I may get a hand diamond saw and try a cope
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Unread 05-14-2002, 06:47 AM   #10
Bud Cline
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A-h-h-h-h-h 1 X 6.

Not so easy to cope, I would mitre.
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Unread 05-14-2002, 05:36 PM   #11
John Bridge
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Okay, Robert. Now I know what you're up against.

You make the cuts on the horizontal as if there weren't going to be a vertical piece. This is a simple miter on the wet saw as I described above.

Then lay the pieces on the other plane and saw off exactly 1/2 of the miter (on a 45). Remember, now, you've flipped the piece up on it's other back side.

You end up with the arrohead on both the opposing horizontal pieces. And it leave a sort of "v" notch at the top of the joint.

When you cut the vertical piece that fite into the "v," lay it flat (on it's curved back) and make an arrowhead. It might not be perfect the first try, so do a trial run.

It will fit perfectly, though.

It's not the best way to do it. The best way is to have the inside cove corners which look like little concave triangles. Of course, they're never available.
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Unread 05-14-2002, 06:06 PM   #12
Rob Z
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Ok Robert...now I see.

I'm going to get another beer.
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Unread 05-14-2002, 07:57 PM   #13
Rob Z
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JC

I was for the most part happy with the IMER 250 that I had. The only reason I sold it was that it was difficult (awkward) to move around by myself.

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Unread 05-14-2002, 08:56 PM   #14
JC
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I am still planning on purchasing the Imer 200 that is why I asked..it is smaller and lighter though.

Other than I beleieve you mentioned the motor is kinda weak is there any other problems I should know about?
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Unread 05-15-2002, 06:44 AM   #15
Rob Z
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JC

Yep, the motor is a bit under powered, but my point of comparison is my Target.

The IMER is incredibly accurate and smooth. If the 200 is made the same way, then I think you would be happy with it.
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