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Unread 06-18-2013, 02:14 AM   #16
enduring
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Thanks Kevin, my tile is through body tile and porcelain. My tile finish is honed. The linked blade in your last link was similar to one I'd seen on another retail site.

I would like to get that type of blade if I can fit it to my saw. I picked up a used MK 101XL last weekend. I am keeping my fingers crossed that it will work without a hitch. It wasn't set up for trial but the motor turned the blade. A pro had the saw but he died 3 years ago and his daughter was selling his estate. So the saw sat idle for 3 years.

Questions:
1) If my saw uses 10" blades, what size profile blade do I get?
2) Would I have to polish the newly profiled edge with another tool?
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Unread 06-18-2013, 06:56 AM   #17
Lakee911
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Super cool. I had no idea a profiling blade even existed! I'd imagine that the profile changes as the blade wears, correct? With little use it would probably last a long time, though, ya?
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Unread 06-18-2013, 10:51 AM   #18
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10" saws use the 6" profile wheels.

I just bought a set of equipment to do edge work myself, and after researching, I decided to go with the bullnose profile bit for the grinder rather than the wheel for the saw.

my reasons were that I needed the grinder anyway, most here favored the grinder profiler over the wheel, but mostly I wanted a smaller 3/16 roundover rather than the popular 3/8 radius, and it was easier to find in the grinder profiler.

I can recommend the Damo wet grinder, it seems well made and has a quality electronic control.

The edge finish from the profiling bit is fairly rough since the grinding surface is coarse. For something like a honed finish, it would need a follow up with some diamond pads to match the surface of the tiles.

In my case, I needed a polished profile and decided to go with a very minimal corner easing and a polished edge.

I made a holder for my grinder so I could get a nice square edge polish.
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Unread 06-19-2013, 06:01 AM   #19
enduring
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Thanks again Kevin. I want to keep this expenditure to a minimum. I like the idea of the blade for the wet saw as it will be stable. It looks like the grinder would take another setup to do the bullnose. I have only about 24 feet of bullnose to do. So the link to the 6" wet saw bullnose blade is probably for me. I like Leon's example of bullnose. It doesn't look like a very big radius was used as the round over is fairly upright.

I have another question.
1) Do I match the profile radius size to the depth of the tile? Example = if tile is 3/16" then get the 3/16" blade? I don't know the depth of my tiles.
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Unread 06-19-2013, 11:16 AM   #20
dhagin
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Not sure if it's mentioned above, but you may investigate getting a local stone counter-top shop to run those for you. Figure $10/lineal ft or so - usually worth it for a one time project. Make some calls.

It's really up to you how much round over you do. I, personally, like less - more of an eased & polished edge with little meat taken away (quicker & cheaper too). Take a look over in the "Works in progress" or "Craziest" threads in the Pro's Hangout for examples.
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Unread 06-19-2013, 05:54 PM   #21
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Barbara - the size of the bullnose is of course aesthetic, so it really comes down to what you like.

Having said that, I think you will find most production bullnose made with a radius actually larger than the tile.

The do this for the practical reason that a true quarter circle radius would end flush with the surface of the tile - a very tight tolerance to hold, and in the case of glazed tiles perhaps very noticeable. So what you often see is a radius that is cut off at the surface of tile well before it finishes turning down to parallel. This gives a hard edge that is less sensitive to variation.

I agree with Dana on preferring a less radiused look, and so far have not used the profiling bit at all, although I may use it for places like bench edges and curbs.

If you think a eased edge may be what you like, you may be able to get by with a low cost dry/woodworking random orbit sander and abrasive pads.
It wouldn't be practical for a large radius or polished edge, but might work for a small eased edge to a honed finish?

something like this - http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-ROS20VSK...m+orbit+sander

I would also guess you will still need something like this to get your desired finish after using the profile wheel - but until you try it on your saw and your tile, it would only be a guess.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 09:29 AM   #22
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Attachment 146633Dhagin, I don't think I want to pay someone to do this bullnose. But it is good to know that it is an option. I tend to have a fairly good eye for making things that fit, so I think I can get this done if I have the right tool. My other option is to do a mitered corner. I took a look over at the pro hangout. It was a few days ago, but I came to the conclusion that a grinder might be more my style, and cheaper. I will have to look that up again. There was some reports of difficulty using the profile blade with the wet saw, if I remember correctly.

Kevin, Thanks again for your information! I have an orbit sander that I could try. I also have an angle grinder available. My husband has a million tools in the farm shop. I can just see me using the grinder and getting a very nice and consistant round over or maybe an eased edge. I am going to post a picture of the soapstone sink and backsplash that I made this last winter to show that I have some skills. It is all out of remnant so there are some epoxied seams. A very talented young carpenter made the stand for me to my concept design. Then he really added the nice detailing of the set back rail and beading. I did the tile work. I know porcelain is way harder than soapstone but I think I could work an angle grinder I think I will practice several techniques, and try the miter too. I have some time ahead before I am ready to tackle this though.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 09:55 AM   #23
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Barbara,

Having done bullnose with both a tile saw with a profile blade and an angle grinder with a bullnose wheel, I would definitely vote for the latter - it goes much faster and gives you much better control. I am in a hurry now, but I will try to post some photos later on today to show you the setup I used with the angle grinder, as well as some thoughts on why I prefer that method. Stay tuned!
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Unread 06-22-2013, 03:30 PM   #24
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Oh Boy Leon, can't wait This will be such a help. I really like your bullnose in the earlier post. I will be having a 6" stud wall that will protrude into the room. It will be one wall of my shower alcove. I want to wrap tile around it and take it onto the other side of this wall. My shower tile will be placed horizontally, in either a stacked layout or a 25% overlap/running bond. The tiles will be large at 12x24. I assume that the 6" width of wall end will just get the tiles stacked on top of each other in 6+" x 12" size, hiding the tile edges coming from the 2 wall surfaces.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 04:46 PM   #25
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Barbara, I did use a tile saw with a profile blade to bullnose the tiles shown in the photo at the top of this thread. That worked pretty well, but it was slow going. Moreover, I had to bullnose some tiles along the long dimension (24"), and that is where the approach fell apart. The problem was that the tiles had a slight bow, as do most tiles, so when they were placed on the tile saw table, there was a slightly curved profile to them. This is not a problem for cutting the tiles, but when you try to shape them with a profile blade, the blade will not create a uniform shape as the bowed tile is passed under the blade. That made a significant difference for the long tile dimension, to the extent of making the approach unusable.

So I switched to a wet grinder with a profile bit, I think I used something like this:

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This approach was much better. Material removal was much faster than with the profile blade, and because the wheel simply followed the profile of the tile, the bowing was not an issue.

I set up a very simple fixture to hold many tiles next to each other, then profiled them together in several passes. Below is my "setup", which did not require me to clamp the tiles in place - I simply slipped them in between the back 4x4 and the front 1x2:

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I was able to profile over 40 tiles in just a couple of hours.

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If you only have a few tiles to do, then definitely the approach of taking them somewhere to have them profiled is easier and more cost-effective. In my case though, I saved a lot of money by doing it myself, plus I got to keep the tool, and the time expended was comparable to making two round-trip visits to the tile place (one to drop off one to pick up).
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Unread 06-22-2013, 05:58 PM   #26
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Smile

Thank you very much for the tutorial Leon. You make everything very clear. Those tiles look perfectly sculpted. I just might have to do this to my tiles because it would be fun. Some of the stuff I do is for the fun of it. Instead of spending money on clothes and jewelry, I spent it on projects. Again thanks!
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Unread 06-22-2013, 06:05 PM   #27
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You are welcome! You have the same mindset as me - I viewed this "challenge" as an opportunity to try something I haven't tried before, and to learn a new skill in the process.

One other thing I should have mentioned - the profile bit on the router is good until it hits the end of the tile - then it tends to "fall off" and dig into the surface being profiled. I solved this by tightly butting all the tiles next to each other, as you can see in the photo above, and then adding a "sacrificial" tile at each end, which did not really need to be profiled but avoided the "dig in" effect at the ends. You can see that the front tile in the photo is only partially bullnosed - that is the sacrificial tile I am referring to.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 06:10 PM   #28
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Oh the bits are expensive, and it looks like one would need a "wet grinder"? I have a regular angle grinder, that doesn't use water. I might try the orbiter sander and just do an eased edge as RipRap mentioned as a possible option. I will have to give this some thought.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 06:12 PM   #29
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Yes I see the benefit of the sacrificial tile now that you mention it. Good strategy.
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Unread 06-22-2013, 08:47 PM   #30
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Leon, did you have to do additional polishing to finish your bullnose or was the profile bit sufficient?

I have a profile bit, for a wet grinder, but the finish it leaves is pretty rough and needs to be followed up with at least some level of diamond pad polishing - did you have a bit that left a usable finish?

Barbara - one thing to note about the wet grinders is that they spin 1000-6000 RPM which is much slower than the 11,000-13,000 RPM of the typical angle grinder that you probably have. The slower speed makes them easier to control while the wet diamonds still cut at a rapid rate.

You could try an abrasive pad on the angle grinder, the issue is the dust and the danger of the high rpm if you catch an edge.

p.s. beautiful work on the wash center !
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