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Unread 09-05-2008, 01:16 AM   #1
rmateyko
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Three questions on Schluter Kerdi System installs

Three questions regarding Schluter Kerdi installations.

(1) Are there any advantages of using CBUs ( Wonderboard) intead of drywall for the backing on a Schluter Kerdi installation? Is a CBU not better for thinset/ tile attachment given drywall has a paper face on it?

(2) Is there a problem with doing the following type of install: studs, water proof membrane, cement board, kerdi and finally tile. The question I have is if you sandwich the cement board between a waterproof membrane on one side and thinset/kerdi on the other side will you get mold - should there be a puncture and water gets through. The studs will be dry because the waterproof membrane is there. I believe the standard installation is studs, cement board, kerdi and finally tile.

(3) The shower I am builidng has a vertical surface that runs into an external corner. See the attached diagram. Given one side of the corner will be cbu and the other drywall what do I use as a corner bead? Or do I use anything?

Thanks ahead of time - Roman
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Unread 09-05-2008, 04:43 AM   #2
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Hi Roman,

Nothing wrong with using CBU under Kerdi but it isn't necessary. Drywall is a perfectly fine substrate to attach the Kerdi to. I wouldn't hesitate to ditch the CBU and go drywall/Kerdi.

You don't want a moisture sandwich so that is a big NO on question number two.

Lots of ways to finish the corner, depends on where you plan on stopping the tile. One of the pros can offer their advice on this for you.
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Unread 09-05-2008, 10:17 PM   #3
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Roman,

Joe has you covered on the first two. For your third question, is the tile stopping at the corner or wrapping around the corner?
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Unread 09-05-2008, 11:46 PM   #4
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Tile Corner

Thanks for the response guys - appreciate it. I am planning NOT to run the tile around the corner. I want it to stop at the edge.

If I use drywall as you suggest then I think I could just use a plain dry-wall outer bead - right?

Now do I have to worry about rust if I use a metal outer bead? Perhaps I should wrap the Kerdi around the corner and then finish one side of the corner with tile and the other with joint compound on the surface in order for it to have a smooth finish. Of course I would still thin-set under that part of the Kerdi.
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Unread 09-05-2008, 11:56 PM   #5
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One More Question

Does anybody have experience with using Humitek gypsum board underneath kerdi rather than the standard stuff? Humitke is the blue board you get at Home Depot - apparently its made for damp environments.
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Unread 09-06-2008, 12:30 AM   #6
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Roman --

Drywall is fine behind Kerdi, and that includes the blueboard if it will make you sleep better. If you believe in Kerdi (I do believe in Kerdi, I do believe in Kerdi, I do believe in Kerdi ...) then you believe that the drywall will never see any water and will be fine.

There are two possible situations where you might want to use CBU behind Kerdi if you are a worrier. One is concern about water getting to the drywall where the plumbing (valves, showerheads, etc.) come through the tiles. Sealing the edge of the drywall at those openings with Kerdi-Fix and using silicone to seal the escutcheons to the tile should prevent that problem

The second is the worry that a pipe inside the wall might leak and wet the drywall from the back side. CBU would be an advantage there. But so would a quality plumbing job.

I'll echo everyone else with a "no" to the double water barrier.

As for the corner bead, the problem is that the actual bead winds up proud of (higher than) the wall surface. Go to your nearest outside corner and hold a straighedge horizontally next to the corner. The curve in the wall doesn't show to much if it's compounded and painted, but is not a good thing for tile. If you are tiling all the way to the corner on one side, I would wrap the corner with tape (paper if you use drywall in the shower and fiberglass if you use cbu) and finish it with compound where it is over drywall and thinset where (if) it is over CBU.
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Unread 09-06-2008, 11:23 PM   #7
rmateyko
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Shower Ceiling

I am building a Schluter Kerdi based shower. The shower will be about 82 inches high, the ceiling is about 2 inches above the shower head - its a basement shower.

I don't want to tile the ceiling and am planning to use GreenE-board attached to joists as the ceiling . By the way this is not green board, instead this is a magnesium oxide based substrate - like a CBU and can be painted on the smooth side. My question is do I have to put some type of vapour barrier or waterproof membrane between the GreenE-board and the ceiling joists?
My concern is that water vapour will move up and possibly through the Greene-board and could accumulate in the joist bays in the ceiling.

Thanks ahead of time.
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Unread 09-06-2008, 11:35 PM   #8
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Hi,

You only have to provide a moisture barrier to the height of the shower head.
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Unread 09-08-2008, 09:56 PM   #9
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Styrofoam Type Curb and Stationary Glass Panel

I am building a Schluter Kerdi type shower with the exception of the curb and tray which will be built using bricks as per JB's book and mud - mainly because the dimensions of my shower are custom. Also this a basement shower on cement which is the reason for the bricks.

I plan on installing a stationary glass panel that will rest on the shower curb made of bricks, attach at one end at the vertical and possibly attach at the ceiling. Given that I am using brick for my curb I figure this is plenty of support for the glass panel. But then I got a brain -wave.

Why not just buy a piece of styrofoam that fits the curb dimension I need? Simple enough if I can match the styrofoam specs. But can a styrofoam curb support a glass panel? Did the Schluter people in their design expect to have glass panels or sliding doors running on top of the styrofoam curb?

thanks ahead of time
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Unread 09-08-2008, 10:33 PM   #10
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Don't know the specs of the syrofoam pieces, so I can't help you out there.

But realize the glass needs a buffer between it and the hard tile to keep it from breaking. Typically, an extruded aluminum frame (with rubber strips in it) is used for glass panels....or if a frame-less panel is desired, some clear rubber strips and hardware is used around the perimeter of the glass to insulate it from movement that would otherwise cause it to break.
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Unread 09-09-2008, 12:03 AM   #11
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Howdy again, Roman.

This the same shower you were workin' on about a year ago? I've combined your most recent threads here but we can bring over the older ones, too, if it's the same project. That way we don't lose all the history and what's been previously axed and answered.

In any case, please bookmark this one and use it for all remaining questions on this project, eh?
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Unread 09-13-2008, 12:28 PM   #12
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Location of FIP Drop Ear for Shower Head

Does the location of the FIP drop ear for a shower head relative to the face of the stud matter - other than it should be at least flush with the stud? I am placing my drop ear about midpoint in a 2x6 stud bay? Is there some standard or practice that people follow.

thanks
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Unread 09-13-2008, 12:45 PM   #13
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You answer mine and I'll answer yours.
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Unread 11-22-2008, 04:11 PM   #14
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Masonary Curb - Bricks or Concrete

John Bridge's "The Kerdi Shower Book" suggests using brick or concrete block to build the shower curb when the curb is over a concrete subfloor. What about building a form and pouring concrete? It take more effort, but then the curb is one piece and it deals with any variations in the concrete subfloor surface which I have.

I also plan on installing a glass panel onto this curb which means that the panel attachments will eventually be secured to the curb. Is there anything I should do? Or will it simply be a matter of drilling a hole through the tile and then the curb and screwing in the panel attachment screws for the panel attachments?
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Unread 09-14-2009, 11:43 AM   #15
rmateyko
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Type of Thinset to Use for Masonry Curb

Does it matter what type of thinset to use for a masonry curb: modified or unmodified? Or is it better to just use regular brick mortar?

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