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Old 08-05-2018, 05:59 PM   #46
BobbyNorthSouth
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Davy-yes, I'm using the notched trowel (3/8" deep, 1/4" teeth, 1/4" gap) to straight line comb the mortar on the floor, but using a flat trowel to make sure there is mortar on the underside of the plank-tile.

Sorry for the confusion, we thought that was backbuttering.

I'm guessing that backbuttering is using the notched trowel to comb straight lines (parallel to those on the floor, not perpendicular) on the underside of the tile, as well? We've done that once, when a lot of mortar was needed to make up for an un-flat floor.
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Old 08-05-2018, 06:01 PM   #47
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Anyone use a tool like this, with the technique mentioned in the video, to ensure a flat and level floor? (I do not intend to spend that kind of $$, but can use a cheaper tool to effect the same outcome, plus I foresee a LOT of additional uses for a laser like this.)

https://mycliplister.com/play/157136...2cfef390b64812
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Old 08-05-2018, 07:39 PM   #48
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Your link takes me to a blank page, Bobby. Yes, I use those a lot.
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Old 08-05-2018, 08:23 PM   #49
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Nuts! Of course the confuser link I posted won't work!

Go to the 19th second of this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duy5Wyf2yZo
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Old 08-05-2018, 08:31 PM   #50
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A laser can be helpful if you actually want the floor to be level, but flat is all you really need for a tile installation. For determining flatness, I find that a ten-foot or longer straight-edge is the quickest and easiest tool for the job.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:15 PM   #51
BobbyNorthSouth
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I definitely do not have the flatness, and I've been using a 6.5' somewhat-straightedge level because I don't have a 10' straight edge. Since the standard is 1/8" in 10' for large format tile and 1/16" in 24", I reduced that down to .08125" in 6.5' (I know, not the same) and used feeler gauges to figure out my low spots, which so far are legion.

I saw the laser technique on that video and thought I'd substitute a little money for time by using the laser to determine the low points, and then save a little money (and time) by only bringing up the low spots with Mapei Novoplan Easy Plus (instead of moving all the furniture around and trying to do the whole floor at once as every instruction manual and how-to video I can find instructs). I don't care about level, just flatness, but I don't know any other way of getting it flat without grinding (which would then require a product like the Easy Plus anyways to add back in material if I over-grind).
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:44 AM   #52
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Bobby,
Having rectified tile and a tight grout joint compounds the need for a VERY flat floor.I recomend you go to the big box store and buy a 10 foot MDF 1x4. Measure from high point to high point and mark these. Buy a cup wheel type diamond grinding atachment for an angle grinder and grind down the high spots as best you can(vacum attachment on the grinder is good). Then check again and mark the high points if any(probably will have some). Then fill in the low spots. Best to use a product that will feather down to 0.Ardex feather finish works good but is a little pricy.

If you do this in sections and then tile that section you might have issues. I would do the whole floor(the flattening part) and be done with the mess.You could then move the furniture untll you are ready to move it again .

Flatting the floor and the use of an anti lippage(leveling ) system greatly increases your chances of a sucessful and beautiful job.

One tip. When tiling a slab I dampen the small area I am going to do(no standing water).Then I forcefuly skim a thin layer of thinset onto the slab and then notch the poo. This assures a good bond just like you will do to the back of your tiles.
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