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Unread 07-16-2021, 03:20 AM   #1
brianm1962
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Please share your examples of large format tile shower floors

I have built a number of showers, but always used smaller (4x4 max) tiles on the floor of the shower. I am about to start a new project with a 72x72 Schluter center drain shower tray. I would really like to use some larger tiles, but I'm concerned about how I would cut/lay the tile to accomodate both the drain and the slope.

Any advice or pictures of examples would be greatly appreciated.

(I realize that a linear drain at the end would be much easier, but due to floor joists I am unable to relocate the drain.)

Thanks in advance.
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Unread 07-16-2021, 04:37 AM   #2
Davy
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You can still use a linear drain in the center, of course have a flat plane coming from each direction. Then large tiles could be used. Be careful that the large tiles aren't too slippery. Grout joints in small tiles really helps get grip.
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Unread 07-16-2021, 10:14 AM   #3
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What’s the issue with the floor joists?
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Unread 07-16-2021, 01:31 PM   #4
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Brian what helps with large format floors on a shower floor is to use a large trowel 3/8"-1/2", some lippage clips, and of course to dry cut it in before hand. You usually tile it in quadrants, having cut lines that extend from the drain to the corners of the shower.

Found this pic online to aid in my description. Since I have no pics of my own
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Unread 07-16-2021, 09:17 PM   #5
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Hi, Brian. You probably already know this, but I’ll mention it in case you don’t: the floor will be quite a bit more slippery with the lack of grout lines for your feet to get traction on those large tiles.

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Unread 07-17-2021, 08:12 AM   #6
brianm1962
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Thanks for the input.
1) Joists are enineered joists that can't be drilled or cut
2) I thought about a center linear drain, but with a center/ceiling mounted rain tile, I wasn't pleased about having to stand on a linear drain.
3) I plan on using a rough/matte finish tile on the floor. Perhaps one from Porcelanosa.
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Unread 07-17-2021, 10:45 AM   #7
Dave Gobis
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Slippery when wet. Had a hotel franchise that tried larger tile. Had their first lawsuit within weeks.
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Unread 07-17-2021, 11:39 AM   #8
cx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian
1) Joists are enineered joists that can't be drilled or cut
If those are the I-joist type, Brian, the webbing can usually be bored or cut quite a bit. The manufacturer will frequently even provide perforated knock-out holes.

The top and bottom chords are off limits, though.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 07-17-2021, 03:43 PM   #9
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Schluter has linear drains with the line offset. Usually on 1/3 of the length of the drain instead of the center.
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Unread 07-17-2021, 05:24 PM   #10
jadnashua
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If you're forming a pan, it generally ends up more like a rounded bowl. Many (all?) of the manufactured, tileable pans are actually four flat triangular surfaces, which is why that picture earlier, has that joint cut so that it conforms with the 'fold' of the four flat surfaces.

You can do the same thing with a mud pan, but it's harder, and unless you do, with a center, round drain, you'll end up with lots of lippage. Linear drains make using a center, or end drain, suitable for larger tile without that cut along the folds.

As was said, though, the bigger issue is the wet traction you'll have without those grout joints.
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Unread 07-17-2021, 06:02 PM   #11
cbaum
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I have just done almost exactly what the OP is trying to do. Schluter pan cut down a little to fit my area. Here is a video I used as inspiration for my large format tile shower floor:

https://youtu.be/sJbrHe353Kg

I would recommend doing some mock ups on your living room floor. Lay out tile, draw the drain outline, masking tape where the edge of the pan would be. Then draw lines from the square drain corners out to each pan corner. This way you can see what it will look like and ensure you don't have any tiny triangles/slivers which will make it a pain. Took me 3 mock-ups to find the layout that worked best.

As for engineered joists, I ran into the same thing and did a recessed floor with lumber tucked up under the chord/flange. I called the joist company and talked to an engineer who helped me out. Below is a pic of that. I glued and screwed through the webbing and made sure I anchored into a 2x4 on the other side even past where the pan was ending.
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Unread 07-21-2021, 05:05 AM   #12
brianm1962
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Charlie - thank you. Great video.

I have pan and 4x4 drain. Will be starting construction of knee wall next week, and preparing the area. Taking my time to do this right. The mock-up and dry-fit is a great suggestion. As obvious as it seems, I had not thought of it.
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