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Unread 06-26-2021, 08:48 PM   #1
Davery
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Excessive Moisture in Shower

I am about to begin another shower project after a few years on hiatus. I tiled a shower using the Kerdi system, with a pre-formed tray, about 15 years ago and really liked the results. The only issue is the shower gets used alot (5-6 times a day) and it gets musty. The bathroom is a bit small and is not well ventilated. From time to time I have to use bleach to keep the mold away. Anyway, we bought another place and I am wanting to tile the shower and do not want the same issues. Is this a common problem with a shower with a tile base? Is there something I did wrong? I really do not want to use a PVC base if I can figure this out. Thanks.
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Unread 06-26-2021, 09:28 PM   #2
jadnashua
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You need a good ventilation fan and a reliable way to ensure that it runs long enough to remove excess humidity in the room.

IF the users aren't likely to reliably turn the fan on/off, I suggest that you might consider one of the Panasonic fan models that has a built-in moisture sensor, that turns it on automatically and off again, once things dry out.

If the home is newer and meeting modern infiltration levels, you may also need to consider a high efficiency heat recovery ventilation system. This will bring fresh air in when things get unbalanced by using exhaust fans in not only the bathroom, but by the stove hood, gas dryer, and any other appliance that doesn't have a closed combustion burner.
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Unread 06-27-2021, 05:25 PM   #3
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So what I am hearing is that excessive moisture on a frequently used tile base is normal. This is in a condo and there is no way to vent to the outside. I would rather not fan on the base, as there is already too much humidity in the condo (but that is another issue). It looks like my only option is a PVC base.
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Unread 06-27-2021, 06:51 PM   #4
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TO dry, the relative humidity of the air must be low enough so more can evaporate. The only way that's generally viable is to either raise the air temperature so it can hold more moisture, or exchange the air with dryer air.
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Unread 06-27-2021, 09:02 PM   #5
Tool Guy - Kg
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Hi, Don.

Is this a multi-story building? I ask because in some of the same, there has been a discreet little port near the ceiling of one of the rooms...looks like a circular plastic or metal trim piece that is an exterior venting port.

Otherwise, have you considered a dehumidifier?

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Unread 06-28-2021, 04:02 AM   #6
Davery
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It is all concrete construction on the first floor of a two story building. I currently have a portable dehumidifier connected to the AC drain. I believe the high humidity in the unit is being caused by the AC drain discharging into the crawl space. I am attempting to remedy this with the HOA.

It would be ideal if I could find a bath fan that dehumidifies with a drain, but I don't think that animal exists.
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Last edited by Davery; 06-28-2021 at 04:34 AM.
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Unread 06-29-2021, 08:33 PM   #7
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So if I am going with a 48" square solid surface shower pan, any suggestions that is not a custom unit? I see various options online, but none are 48" square.
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Unread 06-30-2021, 11:32 AM   #8
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Is no dedicated exhaust fan in the bathroom, Don?

While a solid surface base (PVC, fiberglass, etc) will prevent prevent mold and mildew growth on it, you'll still have the bottom perimeter caulk joint to contend with. Before I remodeled my master bath it also had a plastic base (and walls), the wall to base caulked joint was the worst.

Using a squeegee on the walls and floor would certainly help in your case. Removes most of the water.
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Unread 06-30-2021, 07:55 PM   #9
Davery
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There is a bath fan, but it does not vent to the outside. Ideally, if I could mount a small dehumidifier with a dedicated drain in the shower area, that would be great. I could mainline the drain much easier than venting the bath fan to the outside.
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Unread 07-01-2021, 03:09 PM   #10
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If you're looking for good dehumidifiers, look at brands like Ultra-Aire.

This is their new in-wall dehumidifier.
https://www.santa-fe-products.com/product/ultramd33/

I have the Ultra Aire 70H which dehumidifies my 2200 sqf home when sensible cooling load is low and latent load is high. Works wonderfully well and keeps my home free of mold. It's separately ducted and drains into the plumbing system. I placed it so I can barely hear it. I am a big fan of these devices. They're US made and last long. There are other good brands, too (such as Aprilaire).
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