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Unread 09-08-2020, 04:50 PM   #1
Shady at Best
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I need your brains. I need ideas for running hvac lines through exterior wall

I am helping the brother in law install a minisplit in a shed/ future office. I don't know if Tough Shed, the builder of this shred, is nation wide or not but these things are a joke. But that's a different story.

Usually one has finished interior/ exterior walls and you drill a 2 inch hole through both interior and exterior and run the lines down the exterior of the wall. They make trim kits and they look barely okay.

The framing is 2x6 studs. We want the refrigerant lines to run inside the walls. The exterior is already finished with lapped Hardi siding. I wish that i could have installed the unit prior to the siding being installed but these sheds are built in 1 day.

I want to pass these lines through the exterior wall while keeping everything looking good. In a perfect world i would have gotten to run these lines prior to the siding being installed, maybe boxed it with trim, and flashed the hole, and filled with foam, etc.?

So what should i do? I just had this thought while writing this. Maybe get a 2 inch pvc 90, drill a hole in the siding so that the 90 fits tight in the hole, run the lines through that, seal/ flash the best i can.

Any other ideas? Are you guys following me? I know i jump around a lot when i post this stuff.
Here's just some pics of what i am dealing with.

Thanks
Travis

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Unread 09-08-2020, 05:28 PM   #2
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I dealt with a similar situation recently (hydronic lines, rather than refrigerant lines), so here's what I suggest. I'm assuming that the insulation around the refrigerant lines should be continuous through the wall assembly, and that whatever couplers are on the ends of your (presumably precharged) lineset are smaller in diameter than the insulation. If not, at the appropriate place you can just wrap the lineset insulation with self-adhesive insulation tape until the insulation diameter is large enough.

So pick some sleeve material where the ID is about about 1/8" bigger than the insulation OD. Get a weather resistant mounting block (composite or cedar or redwood), where the thickness exceeds the siding buildup and the height is a multiple of the siding exposure. The width should be enough to accommodate the two sleeves and still leave a couple inches on all edges.

Drill the mounting block for your sleeves at OD + 2*caulk joint width. Then decide on the mounting block location and cut away the siding behind it without damaging the weather resistive barrier (WRB). If this is the kind of siding you caulk at the ends, cut the siding 2 caulk joints wider than the block. Put the block up and trace the sleeve holes. Drill the WRB/sheathing at your sleeve OD for a friction fit. Slide the sleeves through and flash them to the WRB using either (a) two half-circle wraps of stretch flashing tape, the first under and the second above the sleeve or (b) a kerdi-seal like self-adhesive flashing ring sized to your sleeve. Then slide your mounting block over the sleeves, fasten in place, and caulk the joints.

Then when you pass the refrigerant lines through, you need to air seal the annular gap between the insulation and the sleeve. You could wrap a layer of foam insulation tape around the insulation just outside of the sleeve, then compress it and push it another 1" to 2" into the sleeve; the insulation should expand to fill the annular gap. And/or you could use some line set tape to tape the insulation to your sleeve.

Cheers, Wayne
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Unread 09-08-2020, 10:12 PM   #3
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Wayne,
Thanks for the reply.
I have the 5.5" hardi fascia/trim. There are 4 lines coming from the inside unit. Hot/cold evap lines, condensation drain line and a 3/8" 4 wire signal line. I am thinking about using a square piece of the trim, and a 2" abs street 22 degree coupler. I will drill or cut a hold in the piece of trim that will accommodate the hub side of the abs fitting. Shove the fat side of the abs fitting into the hole and caulk the shiz out of it.
Cut a 5.5x5.5 square into the siding at the correct height, drill appropriate hole into the sheer wall, Attempt to slide some z flashing into and under the lap siding, attach somehow, then attach the abs/Hardi trim fitting into the square cut out. Then run the lines through that, hook everything up, flush and test run the system. Then fill the abs with expanding foam if everything is good and paint the abs to match the shed.
Lastly take a pic and post it here from the critiquing.

Thoughts
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Unread 09-08-2020, 10:39 PM   #4
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Not sure I follow, sounds like you are listing two different options.

Worth bearing in mind is that the WRB is your primary line of defense against liquid water. The siding sheds bulk water but can not be relied on to keep out all the water. So it is a good idea to flash your sleeve to the WRB. Then the siding/block over the WRB is there to protect the WRB.

I guess a Z-flashing is a reasonable alternative to flashing the sleeve to your WRB, but you have to get the uppermost leg of the Z-flashing under the WRB. That means slitting the WRB and would change the order of operations somewhat. Plus I'm somewhat concerned about the ends of the slit. Would work very well if you happened to want the penetration just below the lap of your WRB, then you just slide the Z-flashing under the upper layer of WRB.

With 4 penetrations I can see the attraction to combining them all into one sleeve. Maybe you could do something like installing a large sleeve properly flashed, and then use a cap on the sleeve with individual holes for each penetration. You could seal the cap to the sleeve and caulk the penetrations in the cap, and then foam the whole thing from the inside of the stud cavity.

Cheers, Wayne
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Unread 09-09-2020, 08:41 AM   #5
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P.S. Is that white layer visible from the interior the WRB? Meaning the WRB is applied directly on the studs, with siding over it?

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Unread 09-09-2020, 04:30 PM   #6
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The wrb, tyvek, assuming that we are talking about the same thing is on the studs. Then it's got this ox thermo ply sheathing on top of the wrb. I am going to attempt to attach the block that i made on the sheathing.
Here's some pics.

Short story on this shed. $14k, the installers screwed up a bunch of things when they installed it. Tuff shed sent out a foreman to fix the items that the install crew screwed up. Have fun. Look at those pics. Pic out the things that aren't correct.
I am only responsible for getting these hvac lines through the wall. If it were up to me all of the siding and trim would be pulled off and redone. And the windows would be leveled, nailed in and flashed. Hint. The windows are being held in place with the bituthene.

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Unread 09-09-2020, 06:49 PM   #7
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What's the idea behind the choosing a bend for your sleeve? The allowable curve radius on the lines can't be achieved within a 2x4 stud wall alone?

You'll get a better air seal, I think, if you upsize your sleeve one pipe size. With lots of little channels, it's hard to get sealant in all of them.

As to the rest, I'm going to avert my eyes to keep my sanity.

Cheers, Wayne
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